Features

Rape suspects need anonymity

There’s no way to live down a rape allegation, true or not.It’s time suspects were granted anonymity

17 May 2014

9:00 AM

17 May 2014

9:00 AM

As I came into Parliament last Thursday, I swung by the newspaper stand  to take a brief look at the headlines. ‘Oxford Union president, 21, arrested on suspicion of rape and attempted rape,’ said one. My heart sank. A photo of the beaming Oxford Union president, Ben Sullivan, dominated the front page in his swanky dinner jacket. He looked as if he had the world before him — until, that is, the police knocked on his door, warrant in hand. ‘Are you Ben Sullivan?’ they would have asked. The long, lonely journey to the police station would have followed, leading him in the opposite direction to his ambitions.

I should know. A similar journey took me from my home to Preston police station in the early hours of 4 May last year. I could guess exactly what Ben was feeling. He was released without charge on police bail — but even if this goes no further, his name is now indelibly linked to rape. Anyone who searched online for him will find these lurid accusations immediately — but struggle to find out that he was released without charge.

There was another story in the papers recently, a ‘before and after’ photo of Freddie Starr. The comedian looked a broken man. He had been arrested four times by the Jimmy Savile squad, as part of so-called Operation Yewtree. It took two years for the Crown Prosecution Service to conclude that there was ‘insufficient evidence’ to warrant his prosecution. He was, in theory, free. But the whole affair had kept him in a virtual prison, the same one to which I was confined in the last year. He may have been given back his freedom, but the ordeal has cost him his health — as it cost me my career.

Some young men who are wrongly accused try to take on new identities and rebuild their lives. This is what happened to Peter Bacon, falsely accused of rape after a one-night stand. It took a jury just 45 minutes to acquit him. ‘A load of doors are closed to me because of this,’ he said, ‘even though I’ve done nothing wrong.’ He decided to change his name by deed poll and emigrate. A rather extreme reaction, but having been through the experience I can understand it. I spoke to the comedian Jim Davidson during my days under this hateful suspicion, and he told me, ‘I know where you are. Every time you are not doing something else you are thinking of this,’ and he was right. In the darker and most lonely moments, the mind turns to even more drastic measures.

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The allegations against me surfaced over a bank holiday. A news vacuum rewarded me with eight minutes every half hour on Sky that Sunday. The newspapers diligently pored over as much fine detail as was available. One old university friend informed me that I even made page two of his Vietnamese daily. The only thing not given publicity was the name of those alleging criminal activity. Since 1976 the complainants have been given lifetime anonymity — which was intended to grant accusers the same anonymity given to the accused. That was, alas, repealed in 1988.

In theory, police do not name the individuals concerned. On the record, it’s always ‘a 72-year-old man’ who is arrested — but the press is given the nod, so that the public is in no doubt who’s in the dock. The likes of Freddie Starr, Jimmy Tarbuck and Matthew Kelly are thrown to the wolves, even if, as in all three of those cases, no prosecution is pursued. As with them, so with many other less famous men who are wrongly accused — yet, in this digital age, find themselves permanently linked to heinous crimes.

The solution is obvious: anonymity for those accused of rape, not just the accusers. This sensible plan was even in the original coalition agreement in 2010: the two parties agreed to ‘extend anonymity in rape cases to defendants’. But this was dropped (it later emerged that, in the heat of the negotiations, both the Tories and the Liberal Democrats believed it was the other’s idea). It hardly amounts to censorship: the law, as it stands now, virtually prohibits any robust discussion of cases once arrests have been made, even terrorist plots. This is observed even in the digital age. So why not extend this? It would stop people’s lives being ruined.

One answer is that having the accused’s name plastered all over the press will encourage victims to come forward. This happened in the case of the ‘black cab rapist’, John Worboys. After he was first arrested six years ago, several more women came forward to disclose that he had attacked them. I certainly see the benefit of this — there is a case for waiving anonymity when a suspect is charged. But not when they are arrested but released without charge, as the president of the Oxford Union has been.

Five years ago, the Labour government asked Baroness Stern to conduct a review into the treatment of rape complaints. The case for defendants’ anonymity, she said, needed further debate. A few months (and a new government) later and more debate was promised by Sir George Young, the Leader of the House. Lives were being wrecked by rape complaints, he said, and government would conduct a ‘sensitive analysis of the options and implications before we bring any proposals to Parliament’. No proposals came forward.

It is time, surely, to debate this properly. Several options can be investigated — from anonymity until charge to until trial or even until conviction. I am fully aware of the downsides to this, but I have tasted the bitterness of publicity and believe that it should be accorded an equal weight of recognition.

Nigel Evans is MP for Ribble Valley and a former Deputy Speaker in the Commons; last month he was tried on charges of sexual assault and acquitted.


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Show comments
  • Treebrain

    Perhaps if Nigel Evans was not serially promiscuous and opportunistic in his sexual dalliances he would never have found himself being charged with sex crimes in the first place?

    • cartimandua

      It isn’t just NE. A third of young people working in Westminster have been “hit on” by someone or other. The shameful thing about that is when the person hitting on the young person is of much greater power or status
      it is coercion even if not “rape”. There is a power imbalance and NE is very far from the only person using greater power/ status for his own benefit.

      • Treebrain

        I certainly agree that it is not only Nigel Evans but what is interesting is that he stills fails to understand why his behaviour is not acceptable.

      • OscarJones

        Half of the young people of Britain are ‘hit upon’ every weekend in pubs & clubs.
        Human behaviour is difficult to police.

  • Hippograd

    Yes, Mr Evans, it was hard for you when the cultural Marxism you’ve supported throughout your parliamentary career bit you on the backside, but look on the bright side. As a longstanding member of the Promiscuous Homosexual Alcoholics of Faith (PHAF) community, I had despaired of persuading fellow members (longstanding and otherwise) of this richly vibrant demographic that the Tories were the true party for them. And then this trial came along. PHAFs can hardly argue that the Tories aren’t welcoming now.

  • jesseventura2

    This case still portrays Evans as a homosexual pervert politician who will certainly be voted out at the next election.

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    Don`t skimp in the bedside manner, guys. Because in politically over-correct UK, if Madame wakes up with a bad case of buyer`s remorse in addition to a hangover, she`s been given carte blanche to scream “Rape”.

    • cartimandua

      That’s a male fantasy right there but you know blokes get raped too even straight blokes do.

  • DrCrackles

    Mr Evans in a previous age a menace such as yourself would have been condemned for being a sexual-predator with a fondness for young men. Wasn’t it just this offence that Oscar Wilde for condemned for?

    You should retire and keep a low profile.

    • opine

      Oscar Wilde suffered at the hands of homophobic, bigoted system. Just because he suffered it doesn’t mean it should be supported.

  • Liz

    You don’t need anonymity, Nigel, you are a bloody menace, people need to be warned about you.

    • Gwangi

      I think tis you who is the menace, Liz the loon.

  • Liz

    “He looked like he had the world before him”

    Yes lots or people look like that too. Before they get raped.

    • Gwangi

      There you go again, assuming a man found not guilty in a court of law must be guilty because he’s been accused.
      I do so hope you’re never on a jury.
      I would say getting raiped is better than getting stabbed in a mugging, frankly. Just put it behind you and move on! It’s only a P as Germain Greer has said.

  • cartimandua

    Well sure lets have possible rapists given anonymity. Trouble is the conviction rate is already unbelievably low. Perhaps one could release to the press ” a rape occurred at such and such a time and the rapist had such and such an age and appearance”.

    “False reports” of rape are no more frequent than “false reports” of other crimes but the conviction rate for rape is a scandal.

    The lowest in Europe

    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/why-are-rapists-not-convicted-uk-1432600

    “Only 1,070 rapists are convicted of their crime – despite the fact that 12,000 men and 85,000 women on average are raped in England and Wales every year.

    In fact, one in 20 women under the age of 60 have been raped or sexually assaulted during their lifetime – the equivalent of 800,000 victims.

    The figures have come from new research led by the Ministry of Justice, the Office for National Statistics and the Home Office, which reveals that an average of just 15,670 rapes are reported to the police.”

    • Gwangi

      You really don’t have a very good grasp of EVIDENCE, do you?

      85000 women may SAY they are raiped each year. But how do you know what situations they describe? That they got drunk and ended up with someone they regretted allowing into their lady bits in the morning? Well, we all have regrets.

      And your solution would be then? Lower the bar of evidence and lock up men on the say so of women with no evidence to back that? Yavol mein oppenfuhrer! Why not just ban courts and trials and just castrate any man accuses by any woman of anything?

      Jeez you feministas… Lovely armbands and black blouses, love…

      • cartimandua

        There are no more “false reports” of rape than there are for any other crime.

        But comfort yourself with that absurd trope if you wish.

        https://fullfact.org/factchecks/false_rape_allegations_serious_but_rare-29200

        “The underlying view behind raising the figure is that false allegations aren’t the problem we should be worrying about, given the issues surrounding the under-reporting of rape and the relatively low number of convictions. The importance of each is a matter of opinion, but it’s worth summarising what the latest figures from the Ministry of Justice do tell us:

        Over the last three years, the Crime Survey has estimated that around 60,000-90,000 people are victims of rape in any one year. Meanwhile the police record 15,700 offences of rape each year (one offender can be responsible for multiple offences). 2,910 people are prosecuted (for 2.3 offences each on average), resulting in 1,070 convictions.”

        • Gwangi

          Stop your playing with numbers.
          Do you or do you not accept that you need evidence of guilt beyond reasonable doubt to convict?

          It matters not if those who have committed crimes go free; far better than to convict ONE innocent man because idiots like you haver pressured for the demands of evidence to be lowered so you feminist twits can get more raipe convictions.

          How to lower the rate/ Educate women not to get so drunk maybe. Prevent the context where bad things may happen.

          And before you scream at me, this is what many older mature women I know say. Female juries are of course far less likely to find a man guilty of such crimes – did you know that?

          • cartimandua

            It does matter because it is not likely to be a single one off crime and often further violence follows.
            Jane Clough was murdered by her ex partner when he was let out after conviction for multiple assaults and rapes.
            2 women a week are killed by their current or ex partners.
            Rape is often part of the previous pattern.
            There should be a way of predicting which perps display dangerous behaviour and which are one off drunken misfits.
            The young man at Oxford? Perhaps he belongs to the Piers Gaveston Society. They are famous for parties with drink drugs and “girls”.

    • Ciaran Goggins

      You are not on the Torygraph now dear.

    • In search of a witty moniker

      Interesting article – thank you.

      Not sure about some of your figures though. 85,000 rapes per year would very soon add up to far more than 800,000 victims under the age of 60 (unless it’s the same people getting raped each year, which could I suppose be possible).

      Also, how do you know that false accusations are no higher than for other crimes? Here’s some dispassionate research on the matter which is worth reading, imho http://www.ipt-forensics.com/journal/volume6/j6_2_4.htm

      • In search of a witty moniker

        Quote from the article:

        “Alan Dershowitz (1991), for example, has further harassed his students by telling them that an annual F.B.I. survey of 1600 law enforcement agencies discovered that 8% of rape charges are completely unfounded. That figure, which has held steadily over the past decade, is moreover at least twice as high as for any other felony. Unfounded charges of assault, which like rape is often productive of conflicting testimony, comprise only 1.6% of the total compared to the 8.4% recorded for rape.”

  • cartimandua

    Since convictions are so low reporting some details without the name might well

    • Gwangi

      No, convictions are not ‘so low’ at all. They are roughly the equivalent of other crimes (around 25% of cases in court lead to conviction). Convictions are based ON EVIDENCE and NOT on striving for quotas of target percentages. Can you not see how wrong you are here?
      You like many dodgy feminists seem to want to lower the bar so that more men get convicted and jailed on flimsy evidence that would not see them jailed for any other crime.
      Fact is, these crimes are usually one (drunken) person’s word against another’s (and yes women do lie and claim raipe to get attention, to play the victim, because they are ashamed at their behaviour, because they are mad etc). That is why conviction rates are as they are – NOT ‘too low’ at all, silly. But right, based on the evidence.
      How to avoid such things? Well, it seems to me and many older women I have spoken too (who are appalled at the drunken lewdness of girls these days) that women should avoid getting plastered and not get themselves in situations where misunderstandings may well occur.

      • cartimandua

        1000 convictions for 85,000 rapes is pretty low.

        • Gwangi

          No it is not, and here is why:
          your estimate of the numbers of these crimes is pure speculation.
          No conviction rate is ‘too high’ or ‘too low’ and your belief it does shows that you are either ignorant or being deliberately deceitful or both.
          Conviction rates depend on evidence. If there is not sufficient evidence you are ordered as a jury member NOT to convict, even if you think the suspect did it. That is the law.
          The nature of these crimes means it’s often one person’s word against another and alcohol is usually involved too; perceptions are different as well. That is why many complaints do not proceed.
          Of those that do, I think 24% lead to conviction which is comparable to many crimes.
          Or would you want to require LESS evidence to put a man in prison for life for rape than you’d want to convict him from shoplifting a bag of crisps? Look you.

  • sarah_13

    I don’t think either party should be given anonymity. I have yet to understand why alleged victims are given anonymity as if implicit in “victimhood” there were some shame. The only shame is for the convicted criminal.

    • cartimandua

      Because “Sarah” being raped takes away ones dignity agency and sense of safety. Very often rape victims are afraid they might die and are traumatized.
      But by all means have vulva injuries with photos passed around in open court
      and to the rapist to enjoy again.

      • sarah_13

        I do not believe anonymity of either party is helpful to justice it does not mean that rape does not terrify me, I can only imagine the horror of being raped. However I still think that neither party should be given anonymity. There is a well known case of an israeli girl who was raped when she was 18 in Italy, she went on shortly after to win Miss World. She was violently raped and was only released by the rapist when she promised not to tell anyone. She immediately called her mother who calmly advised her daughter not to wash but to go straight to the police and report it which she did. She bravely pursued this violent rapist, who it turned out had raped other women, but she also waived her anonymity. She did so because she knew the shame was all his. Anonymity could not erase what she went through, nor the violent indignity of the assault, but the vindication of is conviction helped her, and the fact that she went public was cited by many other women as encouragement to them to pursue other rapists.

        • cartimandua

          Well don’t impose your “beliefs” on other people. Rape leaves trauma and often self disgust for no good reason but it does. A very public figure is quite different in many ways than the majority of rape victims who most of the time know the rapist.
          Women already don’t come forward to the police because of being doubted, being victimized again and of course being ritually humiliated in court.

          • sarah_13

            I wasn’t aware I was imposing my beliefs on anyone. I was commenting on an article just as you are, my beliefs on this subject are entirely as valid as anyones. A public figure is not any different the fact that women are doubted is not the justice system’s fault and therefore cannot be rectified by the justice system. Part of the process of achieving justice is testing evidence and in order for justice to be done for all there are no short cuts to that. The right of the accused to be treated fairly is just as important a principle as the right of the alleged victim to have the case brought. Anonymity means that the accused life is often ruined even if he is found not guilty.

          • cartimandua

            We have had within recent memory a number of rape /child abuse victims so re abused in court that they have killed themselves.
            Its not a level playing field. Its not “he stole my lawnmower”.

          • sarah_13

            I’m sure this is the case tragically but there will also be cases of reputations and lives ruined as a consequences of accusations which have not been proved leading to untold misery also. These issues are not easily resolved but the principle of open justice is essential to fair process. A societal change in the attitude towards rape and sexual assault is the issue and in my view that cannot be solved by compromising justice in this unsatisfactory way.

          • cartimandua

            Accusations of rape being false are no greater in % than false accusations of any other crime.
            Anyone “falsely accused” suffers damage.
            Rape and child abuse are not the same thing as theft.
            If you cannot grasp that there is something peculiarly cut off in you. You think you could discuss damage to your genitals in open court in front of your abuser and it would be “fine”?
            You think you could defend your clothing and behaviour when accused by the defence lawyers?
            You think having your injuries photographed would be no problem?
            Most people are not so cut off from their bodies and their selves that any of that is “fine”.
            The vast majority of rapes and occasions of child abuse are never reported because of shame (worse in kids actually) and fear and trauma.
            “Open justice” just means even fewer would ever report a crime which is frequently a pattern of behaviour and a repeated crime.
            What you mean is victims should be bullied into never complaining .

          • sarah_13

            There is nothing “peculiarly cut off” in me, no more than there is something “peculiarly cut off” in you for not having concern for those men and their families who may be falsely accused and their lives ruined by an unfair process. Just as you or I or anyone could be the victim of rape any of us or our families could be the victim of false or malicious or even untended accusations which taken on by the authorities take on a life of their own. That could be any of our family members a brother or a father. Equality before the law is essential for any society to function successfully. Open justice enables that however gruelling the process.

            I don’t doubt that it is very difficult to address these issues in court but many women do. I have cited the case of an 18 year old israeli girl, who said that catharsis was achieved precisely by discussing this by not being ashamed of it, by dealing with the horrendous nature of the assault. To have kept it quiet, to have tentatively skirted the issues for her would have added insult to her horrendous injuries. That is a point of view that cannot and in my view should not be dismissed.

          • cartimandua

            Sarah I just looked at a paper about rapists who “don’t get caught”. They average over 5 rapes each.

            There is no more false reporting of rape than any other crime. Its very low.

            You are bizarrely cut off if you cannot imagine the feelings

            of a rape or child abuse victim.

            We have even seen in a number of cases victims raped again or murdered to shut them up.

            http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2014/03/18/rainn_attacks_the_phrase_rape_culture_in_its_recommendations_to_the_white.html

          • Benjamin Waterhouse

            You really are a nasty piece of work, anybody would think you were a bloke…

          • cartimandua

            Rape and sexual abuse crimes are not the same as other kinds of crime. And yes anyone who cannot grasp that is a very odd creature indeed.
            What is “the same” is the tiny rate of false accusations.
            More people are raped than ever report it. Very few ever make false reports.

        • opine

          That is a choice each should be able to make, not have it imposed by ideologues.

      • Gwangi

        And being accused of it does the same to a man. Not that you’d understand that or show any empathy or even sympathy to anyone but the person you automatically believe: the woman.
        Anonymity for ALL until proven guilt. This must be the way forward for justice for men as well as women.

        • opine

          What do you mean, “you all?” We “all” do not automatically believe women over men, or either side over the other. Some of us believe require evidence.

          I agree with anonymity for all until a conviction.

    • opine

      I think they both should, and that it would lead to more justice.

    • cartimandua

      Well there is shame for victims of sexual assault Sarah which is why so few report . What you “think” just isn’t the reality for normal people who felt until the rape that they owned their own bodies.
      There is probably some way with modern forensic psychology to decide which attacks are likely to be ramping up to greater violence and murder and which might be a one off lack of adequate communication.
      Basically men should understand that if they sleep with a drunk she or he is not capable of giving consent and they put themselves at risk.

      • sarah_13

        I agree with much of what you say but I don’t believe that to hinder fair process by granting anonymity to any party will achieve safety for women in society.

        • cartimandua

          Because rape and incest are already a vastly under reported crime.

          • Gwangi

            As you speculate without an iota of evidence. What you want to be true and what is true are two very different things.
            And frankly, when it comes to wrongdoing and abuse, men and women commit equal amounts. Most child abuse is done by women of course, and babies and children killed and usually killed by women.
            Add to that, abuse of kids by all the boyfriends some women let into their homes to have access to their kids.

        • cartimandua

          Then grant anonymity to both . To do otherwise would deter even more victims than the process does now and that is a lot.
          There would have to be some way of linking up reports of similar attacks to get at those attackers with similar MOs.
          There are rapists with multiple victims.
          One recent report found that amongst men who were never prosecuted but admitted to rape they averaged over 5 attacks each.

          • Gwangi

            ‘One recent report found that amongst men who were never prosecuted but admitted to rape they averaged over 5 attacks each.’
            Post link for this fantasy please.

          • sarah_13

            I don’t agree. Anonymity for both parties, as has been the case from rape to other sexual offences, would then be called to be extended for other crimes and we will slowly have a cases heard in secret more and more, the principle of open justice is what gives legitimacy to democratic society and is too important to be discarded in this way. Both accused and accuser should be known.

  • Gwangi

    I totally agree with this.
    Mud sticks in these cases even if the mud is imagined and/or fabricated.

    Any feminist who screams that any man accuses should have his life and health ruined because ‘more victims may come forward’ should imagine their own son, brother, father in such a situation.

    I think feminists often dehumanise their enemy; if they realised what accused men had to go through – and ordeal that never ends because many with think ‘no smoke without fire’ so even the not guilty are seen as guilty – they might change their minds.
    We badly need equality in a legal system that seems to be in some areas institutionally misandrist. Women should lose all privileges they have in law. That’s equality, non? Dump the chivalry, sisters; man up.

    • opine

      You need to stop labeling feminists because they are no more one big group think than are any other group of millions of people. You’re also wrong to think that concerns over rape crimes are held only by feminists.

      • Gwangi

        No I do not – labelling feminists is fine, Feminists labelling all men as raipists is vile and disgusting. Feminists wanting double standards is hypocrisy. Feminsist who want to lower the bar of evidence to convict more men of raipe are misguided or mad and should be told to shoosh up and get counselling for their hate-filled and deranged brains.

        Did I say concerns about raipe are only held by feminists? Stop putting words into my mouth you liar. I am concerned about raipe and false accusations of raipe in a society where men are very vulnerable to such accusations – many an inncocent man has had his career destroyed by false accusations. We need to severely punish those who lie about abuse and raipe.

        Feminists care nothing for justice and often just hate men; normal women realise that women lie and have sons, husbands, partners etc, so that is perhaps why juries of women are less likely to find men accused of raipe guilty. Women beware women because women KNOW women.

        • polly

          “Many an innocent man has had his career destroyed by false accusations” and many, many rape and assault victims have had their lives destroyed by these attacks. I’m interested to know what credentials you have for all these claims that you’re making across various comments. As someone who works with survivors of sexual violence (and yes one’s who have gone through trials where the perpetrator’s have been found guilty) I’d be really interested to hear you explain to them how they need to “man up” and stop wallowing in “rape pity parties”. Your lack of compassion and respect is truly astonishing.

    • cartimandua

      Men get raped too. Not long ago a man walking down a country lane was raped by two men with a knife who jumped out of a car.

      • Gwangi

        No, really?
        Yes, men also get groped by female abusers – none ever get arrested though as the police only arrest men who touch females and not the other way round.
        You LOVE wallowing in raipe pity parties eh? Oh how you adore the tales of horror! There was a case here a couple of years back about a man claiming he’d been raiped in the way you state in the high street; turned out he was lying – and was an attention seeker. Like so many who claim they have been ‘abused’. Oh how the victims adore their status as perpetual victims of life and the evil male race eh?

  • opine

    I agree with this, except I do not think the name of any accused, for any sort of crime, should be made public unless they are at least charged and at trial. Certainly for the reason described here, but also because the media covering a case before it has even gone to trial, make is harder to find an unbiased jury. It interferes with the pursuit of true justice.

  • cewubaaca

    It is argued below that the conviction rate for rape is too low. What is the correct conviction rate for rape?

    • cartimandua

      The same as conviction rates for other crimes of violence.

      • cewubaaca

        What should we do if conviction rates exceed this?

        • cartimandua

          Not too likely especially as po** is teaching kids that violence is

          “how you do it”.

          http://www.rapecrisis.org.uk/Statistics2.php

          “In January 2013, the Ministry of Justice (MoJ), Office for National Statistics (ONS) and Home Office released its first ever joint Official Statistics bulletin on sexual violence, entitled An Overview of Sexual Offending in England and Wales.

          It reported that:

          Approximately 85,000 women are raped on average in England and Wales every year

          Over 400,000 women are sexually assaulted each year

          1 in 5 women (aged 16 – 59) has experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16.

          Download the full report, a summary and/or the data tables here.

          • cewubaaca

            Thanks, I’ll take a look at that.

            Edit. Link not working, can you post again please.

          • Gwangi

            The conviction rate is NOT 6% at all. That is of ‘reported raipes’. That means loads of those cases will be just 2 drunken kids who messed about and the women then complaims + liar women + silly cases and mental women.

            Of the cases that go to court, almost 25% get a conviction, which is almost the same as comparable crimes. LOOK IT UP.
            Very sneaky when feminists use the 6% ‘claim’ rate or use surveys which believe unquestioningly claims of women that they have been raiped – yet we know not how many women were asked or how. If a survey showed a large number of women who claim raipe were liars, you’d want to se more evidence and to see the fair figures; funny you don’t care when your fake surveys show all men are raipists eh? Tsss.

            Stop your feminist Fawcett lies. You are deliberately trying to exaggerate raipe and underplay the fairness and justice in the system or the reasonable number of convictions by misusing statistics to deceive. For shame!

          • cartimandua

            Most rape is not reported to the police and the government gets the stats from asking people about rape in the same way as they get other crime stats from asking people about their experiences in the previous year.
            Only those with a heavy weight of evidence reported ever get to court.
            It doesnt mean all the other people were lying. It means they take probably more responsibility for becoming victims than they should do or there wasn’t enough evidence.
            The problem is that when they asked men who admitted to rape but were never convicted about “how many” they averaged over 5 rapes each.
            Its a repeated pattern of behaviour not one drunken miscommunication.
            But of course both men and women put themselves at risk if they get drunk both of being victims and of being accused later of not getting consent.
            Honestly all the men so worried that “she would change her mind in the morning” must have taken a lot of risks.
            Don’t sleep with someone you dont know she or he might be crazy.
            Don’t sleep with someone not conscious enough to consent.
            Its not that difficult to stay out of harms way.

          • Gwangi

            And a huge feminists industry exists to promote the agenda you are parroting.
            I would prefer we educated girls not to be drunken and promiscuous – that would keep them safe and prevent them from creating contexts in which abuse is more likely to happen. The same applies to boys – getting drunk makes them vulnerable (and boys and MUCH MORE likely to be violently attacked than girls).
            Time for women to man up. Stop playing the vulnerable victim. Get real about human relations too. Stop P teasing. Stop moaning when you don’t get your way and stop playing with men, abusing your power. I am sure then these stats would improve.
            How about more attention on how single mother families and step families are exposing children to the danger of abuse – from women and the various boyfriends women invite into their homes eh?

      • Gwangi

        Which it is!

    • Gwangi

      100%.
      Doncha know women never lie and all men they accuse of anything are guilty?
      Might as well abolish courts of law really; get back to the good ole days of the dark ages, but with a feminist twist: this time the burning witches will all be male.

  • cartimandua

    Since rape became a crime people have blamed the victim for her choices or his choices. The victim lead the perp on or was drunk, or walked into an unsafe place(like a nice country lane in mid afternoon).
    No one seems to say “if you don’t want to be accused of rape make sure your partner is consenting and has the capacity to consent.”
    Its not ok to sha* someone too off their face with terror booze or drugs to consent.
    That’s what needs to happen not exposing the victim to more trauma, humiliation, and fear.
    And if you don’t think that happens look at what happened to the Steubenville victim. Although the rapists filmed themselves raping her she was bullied and driven out of town.
    In the UK victims of gang violence will already have been threatened with death or death or rape of family members.
    So no if you want to protect people you cannot make the victims name public.Since it is seemingly virtually impossible to get a conviction no matter how badly injured a victim is and how clear the only answer is finding more than one victim of the same perp and how do you do that while keeping his name private.
    As far as NE goes. He may not have been guilty of rape but he abused his senior position to seduce. He didn’t behave well indeed in most workplaces seducing juniors is a sackable offence.

    • Gwangi

      You are infantilising women.

      It is the responsibility of women to ensure they are not off their face on drink or drugs., If they are and bad things happen, then it is their fault to have created the context. Same as for a man who gets drunk and flashes his cash around shouldn’t whinge if he then gets mugged.

      So yes, the choices made ARE relevant – and your demand they are irrelevant is unreasonable and silly. Grow up.

      Since time immemorial women have also used what power they have against men, via lying, manipulation and playing the victim with aplomb as part of a personal agenda to get what they want – power, money, attention usually.

  • cartimandua

    Does NE think that rape victims “live it down”? Its a combination of a life threatening assault and a kind of bereavement. Some people in those groups never get over it yet “the falsely accused” (or people who behaved unwisely and think they should not bear any risks from it) think they should be immune.
    You don’t get to do whatever you want without calculating the risks and taking responsibility for those risks.
    The low rate of reporting rapes indicates that many rape victims blame themselves “because they chose to do X or Y”.
    Get to know someone well enough to know they are not insane. Don’t sleep with someone not in a state to fully consent.
    Its not that difficult to avoid the risks.
    A lot of the young put themselves in harms way with drink. That is all kinds of a tragedy.

  • Mrs Josephine Hyde-Hartley

    This idea would seem sensible, considering the general rule here in the UK ( albeit largely unwritten) that assumes people are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

    But of course such a general rule naturally applies to anyone accused of anything, anytime, anywhere.

  • cartimandua

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/100000-assaults-1000-rapists-sentenced-shockingly-low-conviction-rates-revealed-8446058.html

    “Although 90 per cent of rape victims said they knew the identity of their attacker, just 15 per cent went to the police, telling researchers it was “too embarrassing”, “too trivial” or a “private/family matter”.

    Between 60,000 and 95,000 people are estimated to be raped each year.

    About one woman in 200 told researchers she had fallen victim in the previous 12 months, suggesting that between 54,000 and 85,000 women were raped over the year. Several thousand men are also raped every year.

    An average of 15,670 rapes are reported annually to police, less than one-quarter of which result in a suspect being identified.

    Many of those are not brought to court as hundreds of women drop out at this point as they cannot face the ordeal of giving evidence against her attacker.”
    If the only cases which do go to court have overwhelming evidence in support it is not surprising that convictions rates have gone up.
    The Indy article describes how several women didn’t report their rapes at work (even when one was caught on CCTV,
    They wanted to keep their jobs.

    • Gwangi

      So, definitions vary. A woman has relations when she doesn’t want to, and some think that is being a wife; others use the R word. Do you seriously then men do what they want all the time?
      You are in love with exaggerating statistics re this. We are ALL victims of abuse according to your definition.
      I know what I would consider to be raipe, and that is forced penetration with a male member which is obviously against someone’s consent. That’s just not what you mean by it, is it? You think all relations are raipe unless and woman whoops and screams yes to the skies!
      I think the reason why there is so much attention on this and such an attempt to exaggerate raipe stats and create an aura of victimhood around women is clear: we have a massively feminist industry and it is a vested interest for them to exaggerate raipe stats and attempt deceive the public.
      The fact is, the RIGHT number of people are convicted for raipe – based on the evidence. If the evidence were there and clear, more men would be convicted. It is often about perceptions anyway, and alcohol is usually involved, and yes there are mad attention seeking women who love playing the victim. Just look at the craving for twitter victimhood amongst prominent women! They LOVE it!
      If one read between the lines of what you say, it seems you want men to be convicted of raipe despite there being insufficient evidence. Sorry, but if you want that, go live in North Korea.

  • Manny Bartow

    In the war against the superstitions and illusions of today’s progressives, knowledge is your most potent weapon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0094KY878

  • Irie Keith Garcia

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  • Swamp-dweller

    Once a person has been charged and made their first court appearance, their identity is a matter of public record and may be disclosed in the media.
    Until such time, there are many reasons why their identity should not be disclosed.

  • OscarJones

    It has to be a level playing field.
    Either the accuser and accuser are anonymous or both should be named.
    And why does a rape or assault victim have to remain anonymous as though he/she must hide in shame all their life because someone did something dreadful to them?.

    We have allowed tabloid sensationalism to craft debate and force dangerous decisions upon us.
    Future rape victims are constantly being told or reminded- and often by ‘charities’ with a vested interest- that their life will be ruined forever, that must live with some sort of endless shame with no chance of recovery.

    • cartimandua

      You clearly have no imagination or empathy. Rape and child abuse victims are invaded, feel soiled, have been often in fear of their lives and many still are.
      It takes away any sense of safety or bodily autonomy. You don’t make them feel “safer” by exposing them to public scrutiny and potentially further harm.
      But hey if someone holds a knife to your throat in order to make you “perform a sex act” feel free to announce it to everyone you know and the papers.

      • OscarJones

        met them all have you ?

  • cartimandua

    I did hear something potentially useful on the radio this AM. Apparently it is possible to give “cautions” for rape which may be discharged after several years.
    There must be ways to decide who is ongoing dangerous with a pattern of behaviour becoming more dangerous and who “misunderstood” on a one off basis.

  • Terry Field

    A solution should be that the cryer of ‘rape’ or ‘sexual assault’ be automatically prosecuted by the civil authorities for compensation for ‘bearing false sexual witness’ ( a suitably biblical and judgemental phrase to fully bear down on their foul behaviour) and the levels of compensation should be ruinous; the sum awarded should then be given directly to the defendant and that should be advertised in the media in the same way as the trial was first reported.
    That would ensure only real and serious complainants would advertise their violation.

  • LucieCabrol

    This is a non issue for the Femi-nazi’s of the new world…eggs, omelette’s, brave new world….greater good…..

  • Calvin Sanders

    Better safe than fear the unknown. Imagine that they let sex offenders live where the business is known to have children residing for any duration of time. Stay away! I am suggesting you to use this application because it doesn’t only monitor your love ones but also to locate sex offenders so that you can at least assure that your kids are safe, also has a family locator that will let you know where your family’s are. I hope I helped you make a decision.To know all about this, check it out here: http://safekidzone.com/#!/page_home

  • Ciaran Goggins

    Excellent article by Mr Evans. In light of Ben Sullivan of Oxford being exonerated by Thames Valley plod why isn’t anonymity granted for rape trial defendants? Current legislation is contrary to ECtHR Strasbourg.

  • In search of a witty moniker

    “Alan Dershowitz (1991), for example, [has reported to his students] that an annual F.B.I. survey of 1600 law enforcement agencies discovered that 8% of rape charges are completely unfounded. That figure, which has held steadily over the past decade, is moreover at least twice as high as for any other felony. Unfounded charges of assault, which like rape is often productive of conflicting testimony, comprise only 1.6% of the total compared to the 8.4% recorded for rape.”

    http://www.ipt-forensics.com/journal/volume6/j6_2_4.htm

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