Rod Liddle

Who are Ukip’s new voters? The kind of people who decide elections

Don’t think of Colonel Bufton-Tufton – think of Mondeo Man and Worcester Woman

11 October 2014

9:00 AM

11 October 2014

9:00 AM

An opinion poll to be published next week will reveal that Labour leader Ed Miliband is slightly less popular with the public than the vibrant Islamic State commander ‘Jihadi John’ and the late BBC disc jockey Jimmy Savile, and only two points more popular than His Infernal Majesty, Satan. The same poll will also put Labour slightly ahead of the Tories and therefore on course to be the largest party in a hung parliament come next May, with Ed Miliband as prime minister.

This is but one reason why the next general election will be the most fascinating within living memory; the pollsters do not really have a clue what’s going on. The Labour party is reasonably popular, but its leader is considered useless. The economic recovery is undoubtedly being experienced, even beyond London, but the public seems disinclined to give the government credit. Liberal Democrat support hovers around 7 per cent and yet their vote holds up in council seats and nobody expects the party to be left with fewer than 20 seats, and probably nearer 30. And then, of course, there is Ukip.

There’s a case for saying that the best result for the Conservative party in the forthcoming Rochester and Strood by-election would be a win for Labour, enabled by a large Ukip vote for the defector Mark Reckless. This would give some substance to the otherwise questionable assertion from the Prime Minister that if you vote Ukip, you will wake up in bed next to Ed Miliband leafing through a manual on how to eat various breakfast items without appearing to be insane or an extra-terrestrial being. But Labour is putting little effort in — it has already given up the ghost in this frowsy, working-class Medway constituency, much to the disgust of its activists.

My suspicion is that Ukip will win, despite the furious and concerted rubbishing of Mr Reckless by local Tories. And if they do, that will throw the next election wide open and you might expect Ukip to get rather more than the ‘one or two’ seats that both it and the Conservatives have hazarded it might secure. And the Ukip vote will gnaw into the Tory votes south of the Wash and Labour votes in the North.

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The most interesting thing in all of this is who, exactly, is voting for Nigel Farage’s lot, and why are they doing so? Because Ukip’s demographic has turned almost 180 degrees in the last five or six years and the problem for Farage is to maintain the line that the party can represent Poujadist, disillusioned, affluent Euro-averse Tories in Dorset and Devon while also appealing to the blue collar voters north of the Trent.

It is not simply a north-south divide. In a sense, the most remarkable thing about the Ukip vote now is the east-west divide. Whereas once Ukip’s strongholds were in the seriously Eurosceptical west of England, they are now concentrated on the eastern rim of England. The two seats which comprise the Isle of Thanet, plus Clacton, Rochester, Great Grimsby, swathes of Essex, parts of Lincolnshire.

This is because Ukip’s original raison d’être — leaving the European Union — no longer matters a fig; the new votes are coming from those areas of the country where mass immigration of largely unskilled labourers and agricultural workers has had its most deleterious effects on the wages of local people. And also, of course, the stuff the major parties don’t talk about — the stuff that the locals have to put up with, as a consequence, in their home towns; the transformation of their communities.

That some of these communities were also originally ‘white flight’ bastions — especially Thanet, but also Clacton and Medway — only helps the Ukip cause. Membership of the EU is an irrelevance — and so Mr Cameron’s commitment to a referendum on the issue matters not a jot. It is immigration, immigration, immigration. It will not be lost on these voters that the numbers of people entering the country each year continue to increase, despite the fervent promises to the contrary. Mr Farage will insist that the two issues — immigration and EU membership — are inextricably linked, and he may be right. But that doesn’t matter, either, at the ballot box. The stronger the line he takes against immigration and the more outraged become metropolitan commentators, the greater the Ukip share next May.

But the north-south divide is also interesting. Ukip takes few votes from the Conservative party north of the Wash. Northern Tories seem to consider Ukip oikish and rather ghastly — and my suspicion is that the party will fare comparatively poorly in the Heywood and Middleton by-election. This is partly because, oddly enough, in the north it is seen as a rather blue-collar party; Nigel Farage himself admitted, when I asked him about this, that there was some northern Tory snobbery agin his ragged amalgam. It is also perhaps the case that Tories in the north of England, and especially the north-east of England, have comparatively right-wing Conservative candidates to whom they can donate their votes, not the bien pensant liberal Tory candidates of London and the Cotswolds.

In the south, the Ukip vote is going to the immigration-averse aspirational working class — split fairly evenly between former Tory voters, former Labour voters and those who were not inclined to vote at all because they believe that politicians are ‘all the same’, etc. The old caricature of the typical Ukip voter as a splenetic and ruddy-faced Bufton-Tufton, enraged beyond measure at some Brussels ruling on the size and shape of parsnips, is by now close to ten years out of date. Indeed, the votes Ukip are picking up now are the people who have decided most of our recent general elections, from Mondeo Man through to Worcester Woman. Hard-working, anti-toff, middle-income, tough on that besom Laura Norder, virulently anti-immigration, politically incorrect and most of all, feeling let down by the three main parties.

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Show comments
  • Foxy Loxy

    And lo! The Torygraph newspaper has as one of its leading articles some rubbish saying ‘Cameron secures tougher EU migration rules’ – when to read the piece it’s immediately apparent that he’s done no such thing.

    The Tories really are afraid of losing Clacton today.

    • Kitty MLB

      Oh come on Douglas Carswell is very popular and a good
      MP as well as being a nice chap (unlike Reckless, who is
      no where near as popular) as seen when both Reckless and
      Farage were hiding from Reckless’s constituencies in a pub.
      People will vote for Carswell regardless of what party he belongs to.UKIP will win that seat in Clacton but it would be
      so because of a Conservative and not one of there own.
      Carswell should be given a more prominent position within
      that party, in my opinion and someone like ludicrious Nuttall
      less so.

      • Raddiy

        Now, now Kitty!
        When you join UKIP you will be entitled to offer advice.

        I think we kippers have done well enough to date without taking any notice of the skip full of suggestions from tribal voters of all three parties. Paul Nuttall is a northern KIpper, a fine English patriot, and as I have been telling you for years, we are not an annex of Conservative Party, never have been, never will be. We have been quietly working in the north as long as we have in the south, and now it is paying dividends.
        Our future depends on embracing the Paul Nuttall types and the Douglas Carswell types, namely honourable men and women, wherever they come from, whilst keeping a weather eye out for carpet bagger career politicians, looking to protect their backs, especially from your party.

        • Kitty MLB

          ‘When I join UKIP’ I forget you know me better
          then anyone else here…my oldest blogging
          chum and comrade..I remember Mobius, you
          and I having endless battles with Cameroons
          on ConHome and tearing pheasants together
          afterwards.
          I agree with what you say Raddy, the working class Northern voter now has a choice.
          But the softy Southern Conservative leaning kippers who post here need telling 🙂

        • Malcolm Stevas

          Nuttall is indeed a good bloke.

        • Steve Lloyd

          Hear hear.

      • WuffoTheWonderDog

        Most of those hounding UKIP in Rochester High Street were not local residents but members of Unite Against Fascism, whose faces were evident in the video of them outside the Hove meeting last year.

      • global city

        Bald head, scouse accent? Why is Paul Nuttall ‘ludicrous’?

        • Kitty MLB

          Well of course I judge people on their class, accents and looks..if that is what you thought
          little me meant then so be it.

          • global city

            He does not come across as an intellectual lightweight or a blagger so I was looking for something else

          • Wessex Man

            He doesn’t have to come across to you as anything, he comes across to the General Public when they meet him as far more intelligent than people who seek to ridicule him for being bald and scouse.

            I’ve had the pleasure of meeting him at two Public Meetings in Wiltshire and he had the public at those meetings cheering him to the rafters.

            You need to get a life!

          • global city

            Was that really meant in reply to me?

            If it was then please re-read my post?

            I was stating just what you have written.

          • UKSteve

            Yeah he does.

            Called for Ed Miliband to have a lobotomy on Radio 4 ‘Any Questions’ couple of years ago.

      • Foxy Loxy

        H’mm, Breitbart reported that those constituents (I presume you meant ‘constituents, though you wrote ‘constituencies’) comprised a gaggle of violent SWP members, who were intent upon causing physical harm to Reckless and Farage because of their political views rather than the fact that Reckless had changed parties and was enabling the electorate to decide upon whether they were still happy for Reckless to represent them.

        Mind, with only a rump of Tory activists still left in the Party, the remainder appear to be violent sorts that no other party would want. Who can these days tell the difference between Tory Party Brown Shirts and the SWP? Pretty much one and the same, really.

        • Brimstone52

          The Tory Party Brown Shirts and the SWP have formed a perfect union in the masterfully ironically named Unite Against Fascism.

      • David davis

        Paul Nuttall is a good bloke.

      • Fergus Pickering

        Why is Nuttall ludicrous, Kitty. He seems OK to me. Of course he’s Northern and speaks funny, but that’s hardly his fault. Scots speak even funnier. I can when I’m in the mood. Och aye!

  • Kitty MLB

    Oh come on Rod I know I have been out of action for a month
    ( Weils Disease..caught by farmland animals..causes havoc with
    liver, brain, kidneys and bowels..needed industrial strength antibiotics and a stay in hospital..but back to my sweet and near
    perfect self) And still married…

    But honestly, Labour voters, there will always be idiots who vote
    for idiots whose policies suit no one but idiots.
    They all mock the middle classes..those whose business leaders
    employ half the country and pay the benefits of the other half.
    Division, envy and resenting wealth will never help a country..
    Yes the economy is improving, education, welfare etc..but we are
    still living with the consequencies of a labour government but its
    voters hold a grudge to kingdom come.And rattle on about
    Thatcher decades latter.

    Miliband is indeed very unpopular but that wouldn’t have been an
    issue if he were right..but he’s wrong on every account and even
    labour realise this now.

    • Wessex Man

      I would hazard a guess that this Weils Disease has turned you from a nice bubbly sweet person into a ranting snob. Can we have our old Kitty back please.

      • Kitty MLB

        Its gone now Mr rude mannered so and so. And I have never been a
        snob, thank you most kindly. No this ‘ Kitty’ will stay until she changes her name.. but you will always be a sweet old thing, xxx

        • Wessex Man

          I know I know! XXX

    • Fergus Pickering

      So glad you are back to your chipper self, Kitty. Now you just have to be converted.

      • Kitty MLB

        Never! I’ll be the last woman standing in the Conservative party..UKIP is a all sound and fury and will come to nothing.Besides purple and yellow are
        ghastly colours.
        Fergus thankyou for your kind words, I have final test
        results next week and then will take a long break from
        here..others have not been so kind or understanding..
        quite nasty actually and I have been naive. I might have a new start , if come back with a new name.
        and you keep bashing those lefties..old fellow.

        • Fergus Pickering

          Oh Kitty, we will miss you. There are some dreadful people here!

  • fdjhhjuiiuoiu

    LibLabCon need to wake up UKIP are appealing to every part of UK society and voters from all parties are switching

    Please sign and share. Petition to release Marine A is heading for 87,000 signatures-
    please take 1 minute to sign it needs 100,000 to go to Parliament

    http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/56810

    • Rik

      Been there done that more votes please

  • Kitty MLB

    Roddie, my Millwall supporting working class boy before I start work may I say when UKIP become part of the loathed establishment they will be the establishment.The Lib Dems used
    to be the protest party promising new politics but that stopped
    with their popularity as soon as they joined the big boys.
    You cannot protest yourself into government especially without
    any scrutiny..UKIP are a growing party and have potential but
    if they think they will have much influence in just 7 months then
    they are living in a fools paradise.
    People are not protesting when they vote on taxes, education, welfare etc..and they must vote Conservative for progress.

    • Damaris Tighe

      Welcome back Kitty.

      • Kitty MLB

        Thank you as I said below, I picked up a disease due to living in the countryside ( don’t whatever you do google symptoms) but fine now.
        Besides cannot let you lot deal with Telemachus alone. Besides a missed him..Oddly.

        • Damaris Tighe

          It’s been very quiet this past week. Don’t know why. Everyone on holiday at off-peak or just fed up with liberal conference?

        • Aberrant_Apostrophe

          I guess that’s what happens when you deal with rats, of whatever political persuasion… 😉

        • Ooh!MePurse!

          So glad you’re feeling better Kitty. Mwah!

    • Brimstone52

      The Tories have been in power more than any other single party for most of the last century.

      Their support has steadily declined and in very recent years has plummeted.

      By comparison, UKIP’s support is the kind of mirror image one sees in a calm boating pond, growing.

      As for influence after the beginning of May next. UKIP is already influencing the other parties, and the present government. When (not if) it has seats beyond the by-election successes we’re about to see then it’s influence and support will grow even further.

      Meanwhile, those who like to blow the Tory or Labour trumpets are at liberty to do so of course. They just shouldn’t be surprised if there’s no applause the end of their performance.

      • Damaris Tighe

        Yes I’d agree with this. The influence alone that UKIP will have to change party policy is worth having.

      • Kitty MLB

        Well dear Brimstone, we have not had a Tory government for so many
        years and people have just sadly got used to living in a socialist dominated society and thought that was the only way. Blair said this
        in one of his earlier speeches. He said Conservatism was dead. But we see in this country and across Europe that he was wrong.
        Maybe UKIP has influenced other parties and are right in doing so,
        but they cannot be all things to all men and at some point need to decide which voters they are after as we are all different as well.

        • Brimstone52

          I’m aware that there are those who see “Labour” but read “Socialist”, but a) Blair was never a socialist, hence the repeal of Labour’s clause 4, and b) we’ve never had a socialist government in the UK.

          I agree that all governments since WW2 have become increasingly socialist in their outlook though. None more so that the Tories who tried to get us into the EEC during the 1950s and managed to do so in the 1970s.

          Hence the size of the state has been increasing for many decades with even the much vaunted Mrs Thatcher making a sizeable contribution. Amongst other things, it was in the mid-eighties that the government put a duty on local authorities to provide housing for single mothers.

          I think it has now reached a point where a great many people realise that the present situation cannot continue. Our system has been corrupted to the point where we are attracting far too many of those who want to take without giving.

          As originally set up, one did not receive out of work benefits unless one had contributed, the exception being those who had not been left school for very long. Since it was changed (in the 1980s I think) to “need” as the criteria the welfare system is taking ever increasing amounts of money. Sadly no one wants to deal with the root cause. If the criteria were to revert then much of the problem would disappear over night.

    • Wessex Man

      Yes that disease really has affected you, still perhaps you will be seeing more clearly tomorrow.

      • Kitty MLB

        I have most certainly removed my rose tinted glasses as far as some here are concerned.. darling man and like little beautiful me ( why be modest) my eyes are perfect.

        • Wessex Man

          I know, I know, I know. despite your psts there will always be a place in my heart for you!

  • beenzrgud

    That’s a pretty fair assessment. The current controls of our immigration can be seen by most to be ineffective in delivering what is best for our country. Like recent Nobel prize winner John O’Keefe has pointed out, many highly skilled people who we would want to move to the UK are not able to under the current regulations. This is because instead we have masses of unskilled people from the EU moving here and so need to radically limit those from outside the EU in order to simply keep the total number of immigrants down. Most people, unfortunately for Westminster, can see that we have swapped from having the choice of allowing all sorts of highly skilled people from all over the world into the country to having no choice in allowing huge numbers of unskilled workers from the EU. It’s crazy, and what’s more important a lot of people can see it for exactly what it is. It’s an attempt at looney social engineering from the minds of people who ordinarily wouldn’t get even a whiff of real power, but then the EU doesn’t really have much to do with the real world.

  • gerronwithit

    Pray tell me, what is all the angst and handwringing by the LibLabCon cabal about UKIP when the problem and its solution has been staring them in their faces for years and years. They created the problem of immigration and have simply exacerbated it to the now unsupportable levels.

    I dare any politician from any party to walk down any street and ask any of the indigenous population whether they are happy with our current immigration policies, but they won’t because they know what the answer would be. When the current political parties are no longer interested in democracy in order to pursue dangerous, hated social engineering experiments they cannot expect any further or future loyalty.

    • Damaris Tighe

      When one woman, Mrs Duffy, was hauled off the street to have an audience with McDoom. look what happened when she voiced her main concern. McDoom blamed firstly, Mrs Duffy for her opinion & secondly his advisor for choosing her. The one thing he didn’t learn was the lesson he should have taken from the confrontation.

      • Kitty MLB

        Well said D. Mrs Duffy was an example of the loyal working class voter who Labour betrayed in favour of multiculturalism. I remember when Brown, before the last election spoke to a lady and asked if she were
        working class. She said ‘No I have never had a job so how can I be working class’ and he just walked away. I remember the look of hopelessness in her eyes and it upset me hugely.

        • Spectre

          Wasn’t that Prescott?

          • Kitty MLB

            Was it? I remember it as Brown but I could be wrong..it says alot that any of them could have
            behaved in such a way.

          • Spectre

            Absolutely. I remember Prescott having a conversation like the one you describe in a doc he made about class.

          • Robbydot1

            He did. I seem to remember she said she was middle class because she didn’t work!

        • Marcus

          I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again:

          Gillian Duffy was a massive Bigot.

          Labour have been pro-immigration to the detriment of the working classes since the 60’s. That’s over 50 years!
          Gillian Duffy was so closed minded that she deserves to live in the multi-ethnic dump that used to be her home town because….She voted for it!

          • Wessex Man

            please expand on you comment that she’s a bigot, she might not be able to exprerss herself in the same way as you and the Westminster Village. That doesn’t excuse Brown or your comment that she’s a bigot. She knew what was going wrong in her community and said so!

          • shebamurphy

            I think the point that Marcus made is that Mrs Duffy, as a life-long and committed Labour voter, had made the bed which she is now forced to lie upon. That’s the problem with these tribal Labour voters. Their dogmatic tunnel vision causes them to vote relentlessly for the political party that despises the white working class.

          • rtj1211

            I think it is possible to be a supporter of small, but sensible amounts of immigration, which probably happened from 1960 to 1997.

            It might also be the case that, if you weren’t particularly politically active and if your newspaper didn’t bang on about immigration up to 2010 (and they didn’t in the main), then maybe it took her the best part of the Labour administration to see for herself what was happening. At which point, she broke her political vows and abandoned Labour…..

            Not everyone is as well-informed as political anoraks, you know.

          • shebamurphy

            You clearly are one of those people who believe that working class bods are incapable of seeing (and hearing) what is going on around them. I don’t need a newspaper to tell me that I have become part of a minority in London.

          • Fergus Pickering

            London, when I lived there in the 1970s, was full of immigrants, West Indians, Cypriots, Irish, Maltese, Thais, Turks, Nigerians, Iranians Indians etc etc. It’s not new.

          • shebamurphy

            London in the seventies was nothing like the London of today. White British are now in the minority. This is new.

          • Fergus Pickering

            I lived there. It depends where you were. In Shepherds Bush I should have thought the whites were in a minority. And in various areas south of the river like Brixton.

          • DaHitman

            The English are a minority there now, thats new

          • Fergus Pickering

            You are right. That IS new.

          • Gergiev

            You should know that if it wasn’t for the Daily Mail we would be living in a socialist paradise by now.

          • PAUL BAKER

            ACTUALLY THE TORYS STARTED IMMIGRATION POST WAR DID THEY NOT KICK ENOCH POWELL OUT OF THERE PARTY FOR GOING ON ABOUT IT

          • ADW

            “small, but sensible amounts of immigration, which probably happened from 1960 to 1997.”

            not according to a well-known Conservative MP circa 1968 …

          • Fergus Pickering

            Your first paragraph describes us UKipers. Vote for us.

          • UKSteve
          • Fergus Pickering

            I think he means she is bigoted in voting Labour. Presumably a bigot is someone who persists in a course of action which is against all reason i.e. voting Labour against her own interest.

          • Major Plonquer

            What do people have against bigots?

          • Fergus Pickering

            Of course a bigot could be something else. A bigot is someone who thinks Kevin Pitersen is a complete cunt even before he has met him. As the estimable David Gower remarked, it could be said it just saved time.

          • MikeF

            I think he was being ironical but irony requires literacy and as such you can’t use the word ‘bigot’ in an ironical manner because it is no longer a literate word i.e. a word with any worthwhile meaning. It is instead now a curseword selected by the left because of its sound and form – short, curt, ugly but simple in construction with no compound sounds and so ideal for repetition – for use as cudgel to intimidate into silence people who express ‘unacceptable’ opinions. It is a word that is devoid of all intellectual content but nevertheless suffused with censoriousness. It should therefore be ditched from the language because it cannot now serve the purpose for which language exists – to express meaning.
            That is a pity in a way because the word did once mean something – a person with such an inflated regard for their own opinions that they thought no other opinion could be worth expressing. Oddly I have always thought that original meaning rather neatly captures one of the distinctive traits of the left. Perhaps it is no accident that the left has selected the word for debasement into an anti-intellectual tool. It was too dangerous a word to leave lying around where it could be used against them.

          • Fergus Pickering

            I think I agree with all that. And Nigel’s strength is that a. he has charm, something in short supply among the other three lots, and b. that he obviously isn’t in it for the money and c. he is transparently sincere in his love for the bit of England he lives in.

          • Sean L

            No I’d call her a conservative in that she voted Labour as a matter of custom and habit, taking it for granted that they represented *us*. As for immigration, surely prior to ’97 it would be quite reasonable to blame the Conservatives given that Labour hadn’t been in office for 18 years!

          • Robbydot1

            But Blair opened the floodgates.

          • Sean L

            Yeah you’re not wrong – it was a forty year trickle until he came on the scene – what a disaster that man was for this country . . . I still can’t come to terms with the fact that Cockneys have effectively been ethnically cleansed. But nobody giives a sh*t – I don’t know why I do really – can’t help it. Depressing.

          • Chez

            It is depressing – on account of being human I find it depressing my tribe have been ethnically cleansed

          • Sean L

            For sure.

          • MrJones

            It’s like it’s this massive crime except when it’s done to us.

          • Sean L

            For sure.

          • Lydia Robinson

            The cockney accent has been replaced with the gangsta lingo from Jamaica and the US – even white kids parrot it and, of course, encouraged in state schools as it’s their way of “expressing themselves.” Don’t you feel enriched by this?

          • global city

            and opened the doors to the institutions for the left to rampage through as never before.

            Blair really is the most evil PM the country has ever had.

      • hereward

        She learnt nothing either . She continues to vote for the mass immigration Party .

        • Damaris Tighe

          She indeed said that she’d still be voting Labour but she later said she wouldn’t be voting at all at the GE. People like her are the kind who are now looking at UKIP (although I’ve no idea what her current voting intentions are).

          • Robbydot1

            Apparently she likes their policies, doesn’t mean she’d vote for them though. Sad.

      • wudyermucuss

        Before he scuttled off to the completely non-multicultural area he lives in.
        See B.Bragg et al.

      • ADW

        This is how the political class reigns. Anyone who voices anything they disagree with is called an extremist, or bigot, or the r-word. Any politician who says something against the grain is held to have made a ‘gaffe’.

        • Damaris Tighe

          A ‘soft’ voluntary censorship.

          • ADW

            As CS Lewis pointed out, the evil tyrant is always looking over his shoulder, and always aware that he might get caught or the game will otherwise stop. Far worse is the benevolent tyrant, who knows no restraint, because he assumes he is always doing good by the world. The PC police are a classic example of that mentality.

        • Callan

          Correct. Have another look at Melanie Phillips’ on Question Time articulating the same views and giving Cameron the dressing down of all time. It’s on Youtube.

    • Brimstone52

      You offer a false scenario on two counts.

      1. politicians don’t walk down street.
      2. none of those controlling their parties visit places where the indigenous population are in the majority.

      • Damaris Tighe

        Wrong. See my reply to gerronwithit’s post.

        • Brimstone52

          He wasn’t walking – although he was out of his car when the meeting took place – and the population in Rochdale is being corrected to match my assertion as we speak.

    • elaineland

      That’s because when the white working class don’t vote labour, then they suddenly become racist,uneducated,despicable trash.

  • Jacques Strap

    east-west divide?

    UKIP are popular in Wales and the south west.

    • global city

      The desired MSM narrative does always seem to trip itself up.

      The commentariat are so far behind the curve that they have all fell off the ball and so resort to just making stuff up and repeating each other’s BS.

      • Wessex Man

        You are both correct, the party that is UKip is made up from all walks of life and ex-members of Labour, Tory and Lib/dums as was shown at the Doncaster Conference which I attended. After the Conference I met and mingled with Ukip members from all over the North, we were welcomed with open arms by Doncaster people. I think one party leader could lose his seat at his election.

  • Hoot_Gibson

    No wonder people are disillusioned nay furious about Islamic immigration into the UK what has it done for us?
    More Muslims with British passports are fighting, raping, beheading innocent people for Islamic State in the middle East than there are Muslims in the British Armed Forces.
    I know who I consider the enemy within.
    Thanks a bundle Con/Lib/Lab politicians who have basically allowed Islamic terrorists to be educated and nurtured by a political ideology skewed to ethnic centric policies too frightened to confront them in our own backyard.
    Just ask the 1400 Rotherham girls gang raped by mainly Pakistani men what help did they get from the authorities to stop this terrible abuse?
    We all know nothing was done quite the reverse terrified of being accused of racism the local council police and social services all colluded to never ensuring the abuse to be firstly stopped then bringing to justice the perpetrators.
    What a sick system what a sick Country we now live in where our vulnerable children can be treated like just meat by these monsters and get away with the abuse over 15-20 years.

    • Sean L

      Well said. The only thing i’d want to add is the role of the mass media who appear more concerned with allegations against old men who may have groped their groupies thirty years ago, though there’s no evidence other than that of the uncorroborated testimony of their accusers. Not that you’d realise from the ridiculously hyped media coverage. It’s as if these men were offered up in atonement for the P*kistani M*slim crimes – as if to say look we too are guilty!

      • rtj1211

        There’s also fairly long-standing allegations that organised ‘disappearances’ of children from care homes took place for decades so that the well-heeled perverted Establishment could have their wicked way with them. Not to mention persistent rumours of graves of murdered children to silence them……..

        That wasn’t done by Muslims, it was done by the White Establishment, probably of all three parties.

        • Holly

          Now you might grasp why people are p1ss3d off with the three main parties.
          There is something seriously wrong with their mental capacity to find any of these crimes as abhorrent as the majority of the public do, to the extent that they not only fail dismally in their determination to prosecute the offenders, but they go one further in their shameful dereliction of duty, and cover them up…
          On an industrial scale.
          They have genuinely lost the ‘right’ to our votes, and rightly so.
          The thing with bullies is, someone bigger, and better at fighting for the bullied comes along.

  • Malcolm Stevas

    I often have a lot of time for Liddle so it’s disappointing that he indulges in the sloppy, casually insulting pigeonhole categorisation beloved of the thicker sort of Tory loyalist: “Poujadist, disillusioned, affluent Euro-averse Tories in Dorset and Devon” indeed! Ho ho. I wonder if he’s ever attended any UKIP meetings, which he would find stimulatingly diverse.

    • http://ukip.com ukipifyouwantto

      I think he makes that point Malcolm. One thing I’ll say for you kippers, you’re chippy!

      • Brimstone52

        Whereas all we get from the LibLabConners is cod politics.

      • Malcolm Stevas

        How dare you call me a chippy! I’ve always been a terribly decent sort of gel, acksherly…

      • Wessex Man

        If you think we are chippy you should see the letters pages of our regional newspaper, five letter writers were trying to get myself and two other UKip members banned, a quick google under Liberal Democrat activists displayed them all in all their Lib/dum glory!

  • John Carins

    UKip’s policies and the identification of the counter productive nature of the other 3 parties policies are being understood by the electorate. The simple connection and audit trail: jobs’ shortage,immigration, open borders all caused by EU membership. For people to take a moment to appreciate this truth rather than the partisan soundbites of the LabConLib leads to a epiphany and a cross in the Ukip box.

    • rtj1211

      You’re most likely to understand it if you have been affected by it. Or had your children affected by it.

      No politician is affected by it, so they can’t understand it.

      Many many ordinary people have been affected by it, so it’s not to hard for them to understand.

  • Mike

    Sorry Rod, I agree with most of what you say BUT the EU is still the core hidden issue even though its not being raised to any great extent. Your’e quite right in saying that mass immigration is the real problem for LibLabCon whether its loss of low paid jobs for our own people or the sorts of atrocities we saw in Rotherham, but to control immigration & to control our future and culture, whilst in the EU we can do neither.

    Farage opened up the debate about the EU when he sliced and diced Clegg on television and there’s little more to be said on that subject but by raising mass immigration as the number one topic, people can connect to that as they see it in front of them with all its unsavory consequences. Its really a given now that people understand that EU=Mass Immigration so Farage it playing the political game superbly leaving nothing for LibLabCon to counter with.

    • William_Brown

      I think that Rod is saying that the more recent swell in pro UKIP public opinion is driven by immigration issues, not just our EU membership. I believe he is right.

      Whether Nigel realises this is not clear though. He would be mistaken to miss the opportunity he now has to nurture and develop the hearts and minds of those already won over, by either reverting to, or not moving far enough away from, such a focus purely upon EU membership.

      Whilst it is important to many, indeed the raison d’etre particularly, to the first waves of ‘kippers’, it is not the main driver for the sympathetic ‘newbies’, many of whom, I suspect, are ambivalent towards European Union. It is perhaps the bitter-sweet price of political and electoral success – you’re going to have to consider sharing your party!

      • Mike

        I agree, in my second paragraph that was the point I was trying to get across.

        • William_Brown

          That’s good then, we agree with each other! : )

          • Wessex Man

            oh good! I agree as well.

  • Bonzo

    Very accurate analysis, Rod. Do the traditional parties understand this but don’t want to admit it or is it they simply don’t get it?
    The Conservatives made the right noises at the last election but net immigration is now up at 243,000.
    Labour say they made “mistakes” (politically easier to say you made a mistake than admit you lied to the electorate) but now have a more robust policy, though it’s clear they don’t really mean it.
    No point mentioning the LibDems.
    Given the majority do not want mass immigration (see any poll from the last 50 years) why do the main democratic parties continue to support it?
    Political vacuums are always filled yet the traditional parties seem surprised.

    • rtj1211

      The traditional parties:

      Ed Miliband’s family were immigrants, so he is rather in favour of EU rules. I wonder if he’d favour Ebola-infected folks returning via Macedonia and coming infected to the UK via the Channel Tunnel??

      Nick Clegg cut his teeth in Brussels and may well fit his falsies in Brussels as retirement age beckons.

      David Cameron has probably been told by the US and China that they won’t direct FDI to the UK if they pull out of the EU. Whether that’s true or not I have absolutely no idea……but if the UK Establishment can succeed in scaremongering Scotland, you tend to believe that the USA and China can do it to 10 Downing Street…..

      • Lydia Robinson

        “I wonder if he’d favour Ebola-infected folks returning via Macedonia and coming infected to the UK via the Channel Tunnel??” He probably would, unless he catches it. Don’t forget, Boris was all in favour of an amnesty for illegal immigrants some years ago.

    • Airey Belvoir

      ‘Net immigration’is a phrase, and statistic, to be very suspicious of. Apart from the fact, often pointed out, that 100.000 educated Brits leaving and 100.000 illiterate south Asian farmers and their families arriving = ‘zero net immigration’, how do they know who has left? I know three people who have emigrated recently, and they have not had to tell any organ of the State about leaving.

  • Pootles

    Yes, Nige and UKIP have gone way beyond Pierre and the Poujadists (they had some nice tunes though), who were a flash in the pan, whose longer term future was finally snuffed out by de Gaulle’s invention of the Vth Republic. Interestingly, the SNP was dismissed as Poujadist in the early 1960s. Now look at them. Go, UKIP, go!

  • agneau

    To answer the question: Losers who find it easier to blame outside factors for their failure in life than to accept personal responsibility.

    • William_Brown

      I think that you’ve taken your eye off of the ball here. Whilst you have every right to your opinion, I think that you under-estimate both those who disagree with your politics, in addition to the breadth and diversity of UKIPs’ new-found appeal.

      • agneau

        The broader appeal is protest votes. I don’t think for a second most UKIP voters have considered political principles, they are voting for entirely negative reasons. Don’t like Westminster, don’t like foreigners, don’t like Europe etc etc.

        • Kennie

          And don’t like the three existing so-called established parties (the dishonest Liblabcon) and the sheep (agneau) who keep voting for them no matter what.

          • agneau

            Neither do I but I’m sure UKIP isn’t the answer. So if it’s all about giving the headmaster a bit of embarrassment, fine, but UKIP have no answers and no means to develop them.

    • RobertC

      I don’t think that the 1400 young girls from Rotherham have failed and, I hope, neither do they.

      They are not loosers. They just want to stop being raped, and want to get on with the rest of their lives. The LibLabCon party do not appear to be actively promoting the environment for that to happen.

      • agneau

        Oh yes – ONLY UKIP could have stopped any of the bad things happening over the last N years. They have no track record of anything other than wasting taxpayers money.

        • RobertC

          The point is that the LibLabCon party have done nothing.

          When Fathers of some of the children complained about what was going on, they were arrested!

          UKIP have a good track record of telling the public what was going on in Brussels and how it has been damaging British interests. It is a start.

    • rtj1211

      You’ll be telling me next that the Jews who died in Auschwitz should have foreseen their fate and escaped to America……

      • agneau

        Why would I tell you that? That is a reflection of your mindset not mine.

  • global city

    Confusing tactics and strategies I see?

  • Hippograd

    Who are Ukip’s new voters?

    Inadequate racists, inbred xenophobes and the kind of knuckle-dragging scum who think that massive enrichment from the Third World is likely to make Britain more like the Third World. As if. And anyway, we’re interconnected now. FGM, rape-gangs and Ebola are a small price to pay for cheap plumbers for Guardian-readers.

    • Damaris Tighe

      Good thing you posted here. If it had been on Breitbart you’d have been verbally assaulted by dozens of outraged Americans who don’t do irony!

      • Hippograd

        It’s strange that they don’t. Maybe it’s the legacy of all those millions who learned English as a second language.

        • MrJones

          that’s my theory too, irony got lost in the translation.

    • rtj1211

      Look mate, if we’d stayed in the Commonwealth, we’d probably still have as many cases of Ebola here as we have now (which is zero, to date).

      • Hippograd

        Ah, I forgot we’d left the Commonwealth. Shame. No more pickanninies for Liz and Phil.

        which is zero, to date

        To date. Though we spent a few bob on curing the shiningly compassionate medic who caught it over there. And what’s the score on FGM and rape-gangs? Not to mention suicide-bombing, beheadings and fraud of all kinds.

      • Wessex Man

        oh so pathetic!

        Vote UKip!

  • http://ukip.com ukipifyouwantto

    I agree with this: the one issue that excites kippers BTL is immigration, particularly large scale muslim immigration, which appears to continue appace. Nigel Farage is not a serious candidate for PM, and kippers mouth “vote ukip get ukip” when nobody is really sure if that is true, and it certainly isn’t true because someone says it. But to Farage’s credit he has stumbled across a real issue for many British voters. I think the right outcome is for the ‘mainstream’ parties to recognise this issue and overhaul immigration. This has almost nothing to do with the EU.

    • Brimstone52

      Such naivete would be delightful in an infant.

      • http://ukip.com ukipifyouwantto

        oh gosh, called naive by a kipper, the shame. come on brimstone, back to the breathless stuff you guys do so well: they’re all the same those parties, they’re all on the take, liblabcon. Nige’ll sort them out. vote ukip get ukip.

        • Kennie

          you’re learning, but still naive.

  • hereward

    When the next Jihadi bomb explodes in London I doubt if any of the dead will be English . Is this lateral thinking by the LibLabCon (EU) alliance Party ?

    • ohforheavensake

      And this is relevant because…?

  • ADW

    This was all begun a few decades ago. Two of the chief villains were Roy Jenkins and Ted Heath. Jenkins retired to a small Oxfordshire village, ethnic minority population nil. Heath on the other hand retired to Salisbury Cathedral Close, right next door to the Somali fish market and across the road from the overcrowded Polish bedsit, where he witnessed the fights between the Muslim patrols who wanted to ban alcohol from the area and the Poles who were following their custom of drinking on the streets. He offered a fulsome apology to the electorate as a result. I think that last bit’s right, anyway.

    • MikeF

      The real irony of Heath’s retirement was that he used Margaret Thather’s ‘right to buy’ legislation to force the cathedral authorities to sell him his nice little mews house. But nevertheless he now rests forever in the cathedral – nice bit of Christian forgiveness.

      • RoadrunnerNick

        A not-so-little house actually.

      • grumpyangler

        Heath was cremated , a pity because there was something I’d would have enjoyed doing on his grave. Thinking about it, that’s probably why he chose cremation.

        • Fergus Pickering

          You could have dug him up and cut his head off. Stuck it on a spike and then given it to his Oxford College.

      • ADW

        I recall him sacking Powell because he thought that Powell was liable to inflame racial tensions. And he had a point. But lying to the electorate over mass immigration and the implications of EEC membership, on the other hand, didn’t prompt Ted to fall on his sword.

    • Wessex Man

      I’m from Wiltshire and have never heard an apology from this sneering person, was going to say something else but thought better not.

      There were many more from that disgraceful referendum who should have apologised including Maggie Thatcher and Harold Wilson!

      • ADW

        Roy Jenkins’ reasoning was that Oxford was an interesting melting pot. I’m sure it is. It’s just that there’s a difference between Oxford students and some of the slightly less desirable individuals who find their way to these shores.

  • William_Brown

    Spot on Rod!

  • Ngaire Lowndes

    “Membership of the EU is an irrelevance . . .. It is immigration,
    immigration, immigration.”

    Look at that sentence again.

    Read it three times.

    Then ask yourself, “If we weren’t in the EU, so closing our borders to free-movement economic migrants from the less prosperous parts of the EU, would immigration still be a problem?”
    I am STUNNED that Rod can assume a mental disconnect between being part of a free-movement federalist state, and suffering from excessive amounts of said free movement. I’ve never known any member of the public to share that view.

    Rod, Rod, I know UKIP annoyingly failed to give you a free Press bar at Doncaster, but really. That’s awfully sloppy thinking.

    • Malcolm Stevas

      The EU is certainly a millstone round our necks re immigration, but do check the figures: extra-EU immigration accounts for rather greater numbers, and successive governments have proved unwilling to deal with this for decades.

  • Skellan

    I think Rod has it quite accurate. I was at a UKIP meeting in a small market town in the Shire on Wednesday. Pub was packed. Men, Women, young, old, poor, average and slightly rich (me) were there. We all rub along very well.

    Its the professional political class we all hate. Its the benefits culture we all hate. Its the Little Europe mentality we all hate.

    UKIP are on to something. Grammar schools back, wind farms out etc.

    • Damaris Tighe

      I looked at UKIP’s new policy document in my inbox: to my surprise it was very good! Yes, not everything I’d want but clever & a huge improvement on the consensus policies we’re offered today.

      • Fergus Pickering

        I must break my rule and actually read a manifesto.

        • Damaris Tighe

          It’s not actually a full manifesto. Just a short summary of policies that was sent to all members a few days ago. It’ll probably be on the UKIP site.

          • Fergus Pickering

            Thank you.

      • Suzy61

        Me too Damaris…not everything but almost. Certainly close enough.

        • Damaris Tighe

          Exciting times eh?

          • Suzy61

            The future is purple 🙂

    • Wessex Man

      I agree with every word you’ve included except that nasty word ‘hate’ I would say dislike intensely, hate is such a draining emotion.

      An exact week before you I was at our meeting in a large village, our committee comes from all walks of life and for some reason that I’ve not been able to fathom all are at ease with each other, it was never like this while I was a Tory member for many years.

      • Damaris Tighe

        There’s a fine line between ‘dislike intensely’ & ‘hate’. Sometimes a post that one misunderstands or hasn’t read properly leads to intense dislike & kneejerk assumptions about the poster that are unjust. My own solution to this is to wait a few moments between writing & posting having disgraced myself with some kneejerk reactions in the past.

        • RobertC

          How about loath: unwillingness to do something contrary to your custom

      • rtj1211

        You all have common cause currently as insurgents not yet the Establishment. I worked for a company which was like that for a while. Then when the chance of riches came, the vultures showed their teeth and the culture was destroyed. It happens……

        • Wessex Man

          Only in your hopeful dreams, onwards and upwards!

          Vote UKip!

  • MikeF

    Not ‘virulently’ anti-immigration Rod, but against mass immigration in a very considered way because of a recognition of how that phenomenon is being exploited by the left – specifically the Labour Party – to create ethnic voting blocs and support the mock-altruistic ideology of ‘anti-racism’, which is really destroying free speech and justifying the power and privilege of a politico-bureacratic elite. Gosh that is a long sentence perhaps I will summarise it in a single word – ‘Rotherham’.

  • EnglandLaments

    Immigration, legal, illegal and via EU Open Borders, is the single biggest issue concerning very many people. This is terrible for Miliband, who would rather witter on about the NHS and it is a disaster for the hopeless Lib Dems.
    Will the Conservatives rise to the challenge? There are some good signs, with pledges to sort out the ECHR, repeal the Human Rights Act and get tough with Brussels over Open Borders – but it is the last point which is the hardest nut to crack.
    We cannot be full members of the EU and not have Open Borders, since Open Borders are at the heart of it. It is insufficient to merely get tough on any new entrants to the EU, a sticking plaster over a gaping wound. Instead, we need root and branch reform of our relationship with the EU, including an end to OpenBorders as currently constructed.
    EU Open Borders cause wage compression, since the virtually unlimited supply of labour, means employers need only offer the minimum wage to take on workers. EU Open Borders mean we cannot simply ship illegal immigrants back across the Channel when they wash up on our shores.
    This needs sorting out and sorting out now!

    • RobertC

      “We cannot be full members of the EU and not have Open Borders, since Open Borders are at the heart of it.”

      It seems so obvious, yet no member of the front bench has acknowledged this. That is why Farage, and UKIP, are on to a winner!

  • Arthur Rusdell-Wilson

    Best result for UKIP would be to win in Heywood and Midddleton, and prove they can take Labour votes in the North. That would give more credence to their talk of the LIbLabCon.

  • Peter Stroud

    I must confess, UKIP seems to be doing a lot better than I thought. And I find many of their policies attractive. But to get their way, it will be necessary to get elected, perhaps ten or twelve MPs. Then they must make pacts with anti mass immigration, and anti EU from both,main parties. Though there might not be a chance of defeating whatever government is in place, they will be a popular irritation appreciated by voters.

    • RobertC

      I don’t think UKIP have a maximum in mind, and they do know that they are addressing ‘real issues’ that the LibLabCon (and the BBC) have not even acknowledged.

    • rtj1211

      I think the election dynamics mean that the elasticity curve i.e. seats won vs percentage of votes achieved in 2015 will be rather odd. Just imagine if UKIP got Labour down to 29% and Conservatives down to 28% whilst scoring 21% themselves. Lord knows how that might play out……..

  • edithgrove

    “white-flight” doesn’t exist in Britain, ask Fraser.

    That and other gems from Westminster is why I’m moving towards UKIP, they seem like a common sense party in a world of fakery, and the other lot, all of them, including the BBC, clearly need a big boot behind them.
    Their time I hope has come. If they’re no good we’ll have to think of something else.

  • John Steadman

    Am I the only one who thinks that UKIP’s message on immigration is becoming just a bit blurred? Nigel talks a lot these days about curbing the influx from Europe so that we can welcome – albeit within tighter controls – more from the former colonies. And I saw a leading lady Ukipper on the telly the other night saying that she, too – like, for example, that nice young Mr Jones from the Guardian – thought immigration had been simply wonderful for this country. I believe that it’s now becoming the case that it’s not only the old uglies of the political world who are scared to mention the effect of massive immigration on communities, and, indeed, national culture. Is UKIP too beginning to cower somewhat to threats of the “Racist!” slur now that it’s becoming almost respectable?

    • rtj1211

      You can still welcome highly skilled EU citizens with border controls you know. You’d need some kind of reciprocal exchange the other way too probably.

    • Lydia Robinson

      What they are saying is that they would welcome skilled immigrants who have something to offer just like Australia which has a sensible immigration policy.

  • Sean L

    Good analysis. I don’t think it’s *virulently* anti-immigration as such so much as *virulently* anti-multiculturalist. It’s more the scale of it and its indiscriminate nature. I believe the official policy proposes a points based system on the Autralian model. But surely it’s the party closest to your own politcal views in its politcal incorrectness and polices for nationalisation of the ralways and utilities. Otherwise I was pleased to cast my vote in the last election for the Jamaican boxer Winston McKenzie, Ukip’s Tottenham Parliamentary candidate. No shortage of non-white people who are virulently anti-immigration either, at least the recent wave of it. Whether they’ll join me in voting Ukip though is another thing. . . .

  • http://www.readmypoems.co.uk/ Ali

    I wonder if there is something to be learnt from the Scottish referendum here? You say northern Tories regard UKIP as a blue collar party and seek to distance themselves from them, but I suspect there are many secret Kippers out there. Just as many No voters said they were going to vote Yes to avoid being pestered by bullies or canvasers, I suspect the much greater fear of being labelled racist by their Guardian reading peers keeps ‘Tory’ voters quiet. After all most people in their forties and fifties hardly dare to admit they vote Tory, let alone that they might be toying with voting for UKIP.

    I don’t suppose such feelings have been worrying the few conservatives in Rotherham, Rochdale, Derby etc though. Where things have got severely out of hand with the multicultural experiment members of all classes and backgrounds will vote for the party which promises to take a tough line on abuse.

  • somewhereinthesouth

    Immigration to the UK is made a great deal worse by our EU membership. Free movement of people enables millions of EU nationals especially from poorer nations to come to the UK, if they wish , with out any controls seeking work or in some cases benefits Some EU nations are also selling passports to non EU nationals or holding amnesties for illegals [both categories can then come to the UK even though they originally were not born in the EU]. In addition asylum seekers and economic migrants from outside the EU [ e.g. Africa] many of whom first arrive in Greece or Italy can easily travel to France and try to enter theUK illegally. The EU isn’t doing much to prevent this abuse since the law requires asylum seekers to claim in the country of first entry to the EU . The EU bd our membership of it , adds hugely to the problems of immigration o the UK .It is NOT therefore irrelevant.

  • John M

    Surely the Labour polling results create an enormous dilemma for thier supporters. If the Party is popular, but less than half of those think Ed Miliband is any good, then how do you decide on how to cast your vote?

    Do you just assume blindly that Labour will get rid of him if elected (yeah, right – like that happened with Gordon Brown) or do you vote Labour anyway in full belief that he will be an utter disaster?

    I am interested to know, but either way the voting intentions appear to uncover an underlying electoral base who seem not to have the slightest clue why they are voting Labour.

  • davidshort10

    Being against legal migration of people from eastern and central Europe who do affect the living standards of working class people and being against membership of the EU are totally the same thing and I don’t see why RL thinks otherwise. And he’s wrong about UKIP in the North. UKIP is coming second in constituencies where the majority would never vote Tory. Once Blair came on the scene, they just didn’t vote. Turnouts were reduced. Now they have an alternative, UKIP. I think RL might have been drunk when he wrote this column. I also think whoever organises the Kindle edition was also drunk this week. The Kindle 11 October edition is identical to the 4 October one. I subscribe only to the Kindle edition because it is the cheapest. I gave up on a full subscription when the Barclay brothers appointed the vulgarian Brillo Pad as the managing director.

  • thomasaikenhead

    ” It is immigration, immigration, immigration.”

    Yes indeed and that is precisely why the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats are unable to make headway against Ukip, because they all have exactly the same loin of view, one that is increasingly unpopular with the British electorate!

  • pobinr

    The reason that the main parties are not defending mass scale inward immigration is because by any sane criteria, it is indefensible. This tiny set of islands is becoming over-populated, the infrastructure over-loaded, our Common Law heritage overruled and our national system of democratic government deliberately destroyed to permit our total absorption within the EU empire.
    It is appallingly heartless to allow unlimited numbers of workers from poor, low wage countries to pour in undercutting our own people.
    No government that cares about the welfare of its people would do this. All three establishment parties are secretly determined to reduce us to a mere collection of regions.
    For the first time, with Ukip, there is a concerted push to take back our country from the self styled metropolitan elites. Therefore they are now resorting to any and all means to prevent the will of the people.

  • English Aborigine

    Various governments over the generations wanted it to be like this

    This is the way they want it, be in no doubt

    Or they’d change it

  • http://my.telegraph.co.uk/voteregime/ The Prez

    Northern Ex-Tory reporting in. I’m afraid that while I can speak only for myself, I don’t recognise any of what you’ve said about northern Tories at all.

    Otherwise not a bad analysis.

  • pobinr

    The left like open borders for votes
    The right like immigration for cheap labour
    We in the squeezed middle have to put up with
    * Cheap imported labour that drives wages down & take jobs from locals
    * Classes full of kids that need special lessons in speaking basic English
    * Being told it’s just Daily Mail fiction when we see it with our own eyes
    * 28,000 or is it 5,000 Romanians I don’t care, held for crimes
    * Higher house prices & rents due to increased demand
    * More crowded surgeries & longer NHS queues
    * More dependance on food & energy imports
    * Worst housing shortage since WWII
    * More & more houses on greenbelt
    * More & more road congestion
    * Child grooming gangs
    * People traffickers
    * More red tape
    * More pollution
    * More crowds
    * More queues
    UKIP are not right wing. They are the party for people in the middle who are victims of decades treachery & treason from FibDemLabCon MP’s, many of whom I hope to see getting their P45’s next year.
    Here’s to the people’s army in 2015

    • EricHobsbawmtwit

      Your list is hilarious. More queues! Bigger crowds!

      Anyone would think you’re agoraphobic.

      • pobinr

        Given a choice between two queus. One long one short. You’d join the long one then will you ?

  • Ooh!MePurse!

    Rod is right. We northern Tories find Ukip ghastly, bigoted and stupid.

    • Wessex Man

      There speaks a truly ghastly, stupid bigot!

  • jovan66102

    ‘(M)y suspicion is that the party will fare comparatively poorly in the Heywood and Middleton by-election…’ Sure, eh? Labour saves a ‘safe seat’ by 647 votes, down from a 6,000+ majority. Labour 40.9%, UKIP 38.7%, Tories 12.3%. A new day is dawning!

  • evad666

    So in the North Vote Conservative and get Labour for real change Vote UKIP.

  • Tony Harris

    London dwellers love to think they are so much more progressive in their attitudes towards immigration. Thing they don’t realise is they barely have any community to protect, where as we know how valuable our communities are and how under threat they are. And there’s a difference between talented city workers joining the vibrant capital and unskilled families joining a community but refusing to have anything to do with it, a picture we see everywhere outside London.

  • The Bogle

    Is it significant that the Spectator’s Toby Young writes in today’s Daily Telegraph of a need to “detoxify UKIP”?

    At around 6.15 a.m. yesterday, the day of the Clacton by-election, in the Business slot in the Today programme on BBC Radio 4, Tanya Beckett reported from Brussels on the economic malaise in the Eurozone.

    She commented on “the rise of Far Right parties like Marine LePen’s Front National in France and UKIP in the UK.” Are we to infer from this yoking of the two parties that Miss Beckett regards UKIP as an extremist party?

    Is this a personal opinion or is it part of a wider BBC mindset in the same way as the BBC describes people like Mark Littlewood, Director of the IEA or John Redwood, Conservative MP, as being “Right Wing”?

  • The Blue Baron

    Good article, but you called it wrong in Heywood.

  • Holby18

    You are absolutely right regarding communities along the East Coast as far up as East Yorkshire. People are fed up with migrant labour and the drastic impact on services. Added to that the collapse of the BNP vote whose supporters who have moved to UKIP.

    In addition, people are fed up with the same old comments – we are listening to you, we will take action, etc etc. For too long many seats have been “safe” which has led to complacency. in many counties on the East Coast UKIP dominated local elections and now many MPs are worried about losing their seats. I personally think that is why we have had two defections because of the surge of UKIP. All of a sudden some MPs are now communicating with the electorate – something that has not ever happened before. Perhaps now, elected officials will not treat the electorate with contempt and ignore their concerns.

    • EricHobsbawmtwit

      “the drastic impact on services”

      What, they’re much cheaper?

  • ButcombeMan

    Rod

    Can you please take Mathew Parris aside and have a quiet word.

    Your analysis is spot on, his is just inept.

    People like him have become part of the problem

    • Airey Belvoir

      Many of us sympathetic to UKIP are concerned about the UK that our children and grandchildren will have to live in. Matthew Parris , a childless gay man, does not have that motivation, which may go some way to explaining his insouciance about immigration.

      • ButcombeMan

        Well maybe, but actually as a political commentator he surely out to be better informed about what is driving the rise of UKIP and be able to comment logically and without such open malice.

        Just name calling “nutters” does not really perform properly in his main job,

        I wonder about his mental state and he does not look well, his skin tone is dreadful.

      • Mike

        He’ll have something to worry about if Sharia law takes over !

  • Rillian

    A rather interesting video clip has been spotted:
    At 2.16 in the video

    “It would have been that result whatever it said.”

    Says the Mayor, as she hands over to the newly elected Labour MP

    http://youtu.be/YijOvBcXWkQ?t=2m11s

  • Lawrence in Arabia

    the UK does not need unskilled immigrants from third world countries yet political parties continue with this policy despite most being against it. why? the common justification; that they will somehow ‘pay our pensions’ fails to take into account that will also age and anyway many have no economic value and are a drain on our society

    • Lydia Robinson

      Because who is going to work as their nanny/cleaner/waitress/builder/plumber at knock down wages?

      • Lawrence in Arabia

        our modern welfare state + minimum wage make such jobs unattractive for citizens, so migrants do them til they themselves become citizens as do their children, so more migrants are required ad infinitum. Crazy!

    • Richard Eldritch

      Because they vote Labour. for the Left, and are cheap labour for the Right.

  • Mike

    Woops, looks like you made a big boo boo in Heywood and Middleton as Ukip smashed the LibCon vote and came within a whisker of kicking Labour out.

  • McQueue

    The establishment seem to have trouble recognising that the public can understand conditional arguments – selective, controlled immigration delivering benefits to the host great, mass migration delivering halal butchers, Roma gypsy tribes, Baltic murderers, entire factories (paying minimum wage and a huge drain in tax credits and housing benefits) recruited in Poland and so on, not so good.

    Maybe if you stopped being such effing idiots you’d get it. It is opposed to the best interests of the people.

  • McQueue

    The establishment seem to have trouble recognising that the public can understand conditional arguments – selective, controlled immigration delivering benefits to the host great, mass migration delivering halal butchers, Roma gypsy tribes, Baltic murderers, entire factories (paying minimum wage and a huge drain in tax credits and housing benefits) recruited in Poland and so on, not so good.

    Maybe if you stopped being such effing idiots you’d get it. It is opposed to the best interests of the people.

  • McQueue

    The establishment seem to have trouble recognising that the public can understand conditional arguments – selective, controlled immigration delivering benefits to the host great, mass migration delivering halal butchers, Roma gypsy tribes, Baltic murderers, entire factories (paying minimum wage and a huge drain in tax credits and housing benefits) recruited in Poland and so on, not so good.

    Maybe if you stopped being such effing idiots you’d get it. It is opposed to the best interests of the people.

  • foxoles

    ‘ … my suspicion is that the party [UKIP] will fare comparatively poorly in the Heywood and Middleton by-election.’

    Oops.

  • JB

    At least UKIP is trying to stand up for the working man and protect British citizens through proposed parliamentary reforms, such as a tightened immigration policy, and fairer tax system. Why should people be punished by politicians for working in low-income jobs, in a recession hit country, as law abiding citizens, whilst others – including those who have murdered, raped and committed torture – seemingly bypass immigration checks (even when their previous history is fully known to the authorities), claim maximum state entitlements and, in return, do nothing all day other than to plan more crime or anarchy? Economically, for how long can Britain simply give away ‘free cash’ newcomers who have never set foot inside the country before? Equally, why should workers pay high taxes just to supplement benefit-derived lifestyles whilst some recipients then go to work on the black-market, publicly criticise the Nation for intolerance, preach hatred or go around murdering and abusing children? And, how do sloppy political attitudes with indecisive policies that have been seemingly founded on shifting sands get anywhere close to protecting British citizens, like the poor Rotherham victims? How can those who have rigged interest rates go untried when people have been evicted for not being able to afford their mortgage repayments, whereas NHS and Local Councils are bankrupted and public sector employees sacked by the so-called experts that have given Britain’s sovereignty away to Brussels and money to other countries that have financially imploded on the back of embracing the ‘free-ride’ Euro currency?

  • Linda Smith

    Our political masters just don’t geddit. Its the peasants revolt. But this time we’ll win.

  • William Clark

    Since 1964 we have all had to pretend we agree with an extreme anti-English, anti-free speech, politically correct orthodoxy no-one dared challenge for fear of being castigated as a national socialist. The inability of any mainstream political party to articulate a reasonable defence against the destruction of a whole nation and its culture is the cause of the current popular antipathy to ‘Westminster’. Whoever you have elected since then has carried on the process and has in fact accelerated it. This suppression of an entire nation was bound to produce a reaction one day and this is it. In the same way that the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 and the subsequent suppression of free speech produced a violent revolution a century later, this coming backlash was inevitable. Nigel Farage will take seats from Labour and Tory next time and they have no-one to blame but themselves. No-one voted for mass immigration and there has been a massive conspiracy of condemnation against anyone who remotely questioned it. Labour deliberately set out to destroy the English by outnumbering them in their own land, importing votes into the bargain. The Tories did not have the guts to take them on, and along with everyone else had to pretend it was all fine. Scottish Nationalism has not helped either. Why should the English have to stand by silent and impotent while they are accused of every possible evil by tartan types foaming at the mouth with simultaneously self-righteous and extremely selfish indignation at being handed more public spending than them, while all working for the state? This is the revenge of a wronged people, living in a world where all races are favoured except them, even though they know they are the ones who have actually kept the ship from sinking, while their ‘friends’ have been hacking holes in the hull at every turn. It is all going to come to an end now.

  • somewhereinthesouth

    We’ve been told by the established parities for decades now that EU is good for us , that immigration is a good thing ; that multi culturalism is always a good thing; that climate change and greening the economy is the priority. Human rights [ even of foreigners] were a key priority.The reality for many is the opposite:

    -The EU and Euro has eroded our sovereignty and damaged the UK in all sorts of ways from our finishing industry, to agriculture , is fuelling higher food prices , negative impacts on our justice system, increased immigration and is causing damage to economic growth and the City ;

    – immigration has placed huge pressure on housing , the NHS, schools, the benefits system and has resulted in reduced wages for many especially the lower paid ;

    – Multi culturalism has fostered ghettos and allowed parts of our country to become foreign enclaves which could not be criticised – breeding grounds for hatred of our culture [ and even terrorism] whislt the sexual abuse of vulnerable white girls was ignored by the establishment;

    – Climate change policy has damaged the countryside [ wind farms ] and has increased the cost of already our expensive energy causing hardship to many and is damaging industry , whilst producing no obvious benefits to locals or even slowing the rate of world carbon emissions growth.

    – Human rights are routinely being abused by criminals and foreigners [who have often contributed little or nothing by way of significant taxation or NI ] to claim benefits [sometimes for wives and children living abroad], obtain subsidised housing and avoid deportation, despite on some occasions committing repeated crimes.

    Anyone who opposed this mainstream orthodoxy or its pernicious impacts was dismissed as being little Englanders, nationalists and fruitcakes [Europe] , Selfish narrow minded , bigots , neo Nazis [ immigration ], closet racists and intolerant nationalists [multi culturalism] and climate change deniers [ global warming ] or simply callous uncaring or unjust [human rights]. These are the voters who no longer want to support Labour the Liberals or the Tories. The major parties having signed up to this liberal internationalist agenda over decades [and have dismissed or refused to address the downsides of these polices, impacts which are very evident to many living in the the real world of paying bills and taxes, living with their increasingly different neighbours , finding a home or seeking paid work. Nor have they much to offer if you listen to them . Even if they did change their tune on Europe , energy policy or Immigration who would believe them now?

  • Lydia Robinson

    Some of us live in areas that look like this: http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/12/14/article-2523658-1A179E4500000578-127_634x393.jpg and politicians from LibLabCon have encouraged it. Well, they would, as they don’t have to live with it.

  • global city

    One thing that I’ve noticed on reading and taking part in quite a lot of these forums down the years is that the dam has burst, as far as self censorship goes. Some goons try to use the old tropes that a while back would have the immediate effect of stopping people contributing any more…not so now!

    This is a good thing.

    Now we must find a way to rid ourselves of the evil influence of the parasitic left who have infested most of our institutions and structures of governance and information dissemination.

  • Ger

    When a party comes along that shakes evil,you can focus on that evil.the war on real monsters is beginning.labour libdems conservatives are the face of this evil.we nssd to get past the face and attack the putrid heart of the beast.

  • Stewie Swansea

    The idea of having a local representative in parliament is that he/she represents the views of local people. Surely the fairest way to acheive this is for local people to vote for the representative of their choice. Instead of whining that they didn’t offer the most popular candidate in 649 of the 650 constituencies, why don’t UKIP offer up candidates that are more popular. Over the last few years, UKIP have made an effort to remove many of the vocally racist and homophobic candidates. If they make an effort to remove the stupid ones too they may manage more than one MP at the next election.

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