Features

How the NHS silenced a whistleblowing doctor

Pity the healthcare professionals who dare to speak out about problems in the NHS

3 January 2015

9:00 AM

3 January 2015

9:00 AM

Almost two years ago, a cancer surgeon named Joseph Meirion Thomas decided that he could no longer keep quiet about what he regarded as a major abuse of the NHS. The Francis inquiry into the scandal at Stafford Hospital had just published its report, reminding doctors of their ‘duty of candour’. Thomas interpreted that to mean that health professionals ‘should feel supported and protected should they ever need to speak out.’ In that spirit, he wrote in The Spectator about ‘health tourism’ — foreign nationals using NHS services to which they are not entitled, placing an already overburdened system under yet more strain.

His article caught the attention of Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, who ordered a full investigation. Encouraged, Thomas went on to write more articles about the NHS’s problems, much to the chagrin of the health establishment. The last of these sought to challenge the idea that GPs are always and everywhere a force for good. In fact they’re overrated, he said. Rather than being ‘supported and protected’, Thomas then found himself suspended from his job and ordered not to air his views in public again. Even now, he is unable to tell his story.

Like most whistleblowers, Meirion Thomas is a prickly character, as Jeremy Hunt soon discovered. The Health Secretary contacted him in person after the ‘health tourism’ article to applaud his stand. Hunt’s reward was a follow-up article accusing the government of failing ‘to grasp the nettle’ of health tourism, and then another arguing that its whole approach to NHS reform was wrongheaded. The articles were picked up by the daily newspapers, and caused quite a stir.

It’s easy to see why. Many of the NHS’s 1.7 million staff can see what’s wrong with the service, but are afraid to speak out. As the Francis inquiry concluded, this lack of candour has become one of the most serious problems facing British healthcare. Even discussing NHS failures in private can be risky. Doing it in the press is tantamount to career suicide.

Just ask Shiban Ahmed, a paediatric surgeon who attempted to blow the whistle on the ‘barbaric and amateurish’ circumcisions of boys aged six to ten at the hands of poorly trained GPs. He flagged the issue to the patient safety regulator, and ended up facing disciplinary action. Or there’s Peter O’Keefe, a heart surgeon who was suspended (on ‘bullying’ charges) after he raised concerns about the treatment of a patient who had serious brain damage. Or Dr Raj Mattu, a cardiologist who lost his job at a Coventry hospital after warning on national radio that patients were dying because a cardiac unit was overcrowded.

But Thomas refused to be cowed. A year ago, he wrote an article for the Daily Mail floating the politically incorrect idea that the growing dominance of women doctors in British healthcare is a potential problem. ‘I am a feminist,’ he said, but he was still alarmed that women make up 61 per cent of doctors under the age of 30. Female doctors, he said, ‘end up working part-time, usually in general practice, and then retire early… as a result, it is necessary to train two female doctors so they can cover the same amount of work as one full-time colleague.’

This annoyed the medical profession so much that the Royal College of Surgeons was lobbied to denounce him. Its president was badgered into saying that he found the article ‘unhelpful’.

In November, in the Daily Mail again, Thomas wrote that GPs were ‘an anachronism no longer fit for purpose’. Family doctors are increasingly unavailable to their patients, he said, and ‘have also shown they are not trained or equipped for highly specialised medical work. So patients have no option but to attend A&E or ring the emergency services.’

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For some figures in the upper echelons of the NHS, this was just too much. Maureen Baker, chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners, sent an email to colleagues saying: ‘I am sure you will be as outraged as I was this week when you read Professor J. Meirion Thomas’ scathing article… I don’t know what Meirion Thomas’s problem is. Perhaps he just doesn’t understand the complex and excellent work involved in general practice? Perhaps he is just living in another — outdated — time, that is best left in the past.’ In an official response, entitled ‘Meirion Thomas will have made GPs’ blood boil’, she called the surgeon’s views ‘misplaced, elitist, and archaic’.

Doctors took to Twitter and Facebook to share their disgust. Lucy Gaden, a doctor in Nottingham, put up an online petition on the website change.org entitled: ‘Stop Prof Meirion Thomas disrespecting GPs, female and overseas doctors in the media’. Dr Gaden suggested that he had breached the General Medical Council’s rules on doctorly behaviour:

The GMC Duties of a Doctor document states: 35. You must work collaboratively with colleagues, respecting their skills and contributions. 36. You must treat colleagues fairly and with respect. 37. You must be aware of how your behaviour may influence others within and outside the team. His failure on all three of these components needs highlighting to the GMC.

The petition garnered more than 1,500 ‘supporters’. One, going by the name ‘Richard Clubb’, wrote underneath: ‘I’m signing because you are a disgrace to your profession and to your Welsh Christian name. I assume you are not well.’

Dr Gaden insists she doesn’t want Thomas to be struck off. ‘I just want him to be given a jolly good ticking off,’ she told me. ‘I do believe that he has a right to free speech but I don’t believe as a doctor he has the right to publish such inflammatory articles, and he has clearly breached his duties as a doctor.’

The GMC, to its great credit, endorsed Meirion Thomas’s right to speak freely and said it would not pursue the matter. But his enemies would not be stopped there.

A new email went round among doctors under the subject heading ‘The vile Mr Meirion Thomas’, calling him an ‘evil man’. Professor Azeem Majeed, who runs the Department of Primary Care and Public Health at Imperial College London wrote a bossy email to the chiefs of the Royal Marsden, where Thomas works, apparently suggesting that the hospital could suffer financially as a result of his outbursts. It is worth quoting at length:

I would be very grateful if you could answer some questions for me and my colleagues. Firstly, does the article represent the views of your senior medical staff? If not, do you plan to issue a statement disassociating yourself from the article? Secondly, can you summarise your policies for ensuring good working relationships with NHS staff working in primary care? Thirdly, can you explain to me why GPs should continue to refer patients to the Royal Marsden Hospital rather than some of the other large NHS Trusts in London that offer excellent cancer services — such as Imperial, UCLH, GSTT and King’s — where we have very good working relationships with their specialist medical staff?

The Royal Marsden was put in a difficult position, faced with a possible loss of patient referrals as a result of Thomas’s actions. Its directors decided to put Thomas on gardening leave, then reinstated him on the condition that he never published an article again — at least not without submitting the text to the hospital’s management for approval. A gagging order, in other words, which Thomas had to sign to keep his job.

At the same time, Imperial College wrote to Thomas informing him that he did not have the right to call himself professor — as he had done in his articles and on the Royal Marsden website — since his honorary professorship from Imperial had expired in 2012. Imperial told me that ‘as a matter of routine the College writes to correct out-of-date information in the public domain.’ But there can be no doubt that their letter was prompted by Thomas’s attack on GPs.

Thomas declined to comment on this article, other than to say that he had not been aware his professorship had expired until he read the letter from Imperial. Professor Martin Gore, the Marsden’s medical director, also refused to say anything. Professor Majeed confirmed that he had emailed the Marsden, but said that he was not involved in the ‘preparation or sending’ of the letter concerning Thomas’s professorship.

The Royal Marsden has sought to draw a line under the matter. It published a statement on its website saying it does not ‘share, condone or support’ Thomas’s views: ‘It is important to state that all individuals are entitled to express a view. They are not however entitled to speak on behalf of an organisation without that organisation’s consent. Professor Thomas did not seek or receive this organisation’s consent to either article.’

But Thomas did not claim to speak for the Royal Marsden. Indeed, when he wrote for The Spectator, he insisted on being described simply as an NHS surgeon. His critics knew, however, that the Marsden, as his employer, had the power to shut him up.

What’s most troubling is that, for all the fuss, almost no one has attempted to tackle Thomas’s arguments. The offended doctors prefer to say how hurt they are, and isn’t that outrageous. But wounded feelings don’t matter, really, and free speech does. Moreover, free speech inside Britain’s health service — on which so many lives depend — is especially important.

Following the Stafford Hospital scandal — when patients were regularly left lying in their own faeces because the hospital was so badly run — Sir David Nicholson, the then head of the NHS, pledged to intervene whenever he ‘caught a whiff’ that staff were being bullied into staying quiet. The British Medical Association spoke of the need for a ‘new NHS culture… where there is an ethos that raising concerns is not only acceptable but a positive thing to do.’

While it is true that Thomas’s articles did not expose some Stafford Hospital-style horror, he was raising genuine concerns and trying to say how the NHS might work better. For this, he has been denounced, abused and hushed.

It’s hard to change the culture of a cherished but flawed institution such as the NHS, especially when the treatment of people such as Thomas sends a strong message. Yes, the government says you should speak out if you see something wrong. But look at what happens to those who do.

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Show comments
  • Ed  

    Boy, how bureaucrats hate and resent being held to account. Can’t have that.

    The Prime Minister should meet with Dr Thomas, and proceed to shove several of his receommendations down the NHS’ throat, just to make a point.

  • TommyCastro

    Shocking. It’s difficult to imagine how challenging it is to reform, improve, increase productivity in an organisation that has 1,7 million employees, some of the most senior with confused and massive ego’s. It will take a generation and, stating the obvious, requires political parties to agree a long term strategy. Is it impossible?

  • St Ignatius

    Medics behaving like children when their bad behaviour is pointed out to them. Who knew? In my experience medics are always more interested in their careers than the state of the health service. GPs are a joke, and pretty much everyone you speak to who doesn’t have a vested interested will tell you it’s a mockery of the medical profession.

    • warmingmyth

      General Practice in London has always been problematic.
      For those who may not have picked up on this — The Marsden and Imperial College are both in central London and all those medical practitioners involved working at these institutions would probably live in London.
      But certainly the profession as a whole should raise the level of debate if they are to retain credibility.

    • 120176A

      Was going to try and say why you are wrong to make such sweeping judgements. Then I remembered I have left the UK so this is not my problem anymore. And you would not believe me no matter what was written.

      Still wondering why I care at all, but maybe that is why I post something, anything.

      DOI: consultant surgeon, ex clinical and medical director within the NHS. The latter are not pure managerial roles: they were over and above the clinical workload. Miss the UK and would return in a heartbeat. But to the views expressed by so many commentators here and the Daily Wail? Let alone Meirion Thomas? Never. Find some other poor creature to kick, demoralise and denigrate.

      What next? How we fix the railways, roads, Royal Mail? Airports? So many experts, nothing changes.

      • St Ignatius

        That was why I said “in my experience”. (But I do know many medics.) What I find most odd about the medical profession is why they all seem so obsessed with their career trajectory rather than doing the job for which they are paid. It’s not normal to reach the top of your profession by examination at the age of 35, as many consultants seem to.

    • Gwangi

      Indeed – they close ranks and watch each other’s backs.
      They want to keep facts and the truth away from patients who they treat with utter contempt or at best like children who don’t deserve to be treated with respect and honesty.
      What a sham! What a scam! And the Royal College of Nurses is just as corrupt too, always defending nurses even when their actions kill people or using the usual emotional blackmail which tries to silence all criticism of nurses.
      The mad thing is that bus drivers are scrutinised and observed and monitored far more than doctors, surgeons and nurses. What does that say about our country eh?

    • ArthurSparknottle

      I don’t know where you live, but where I live, I could not have been more happy with the excellent way my elderly relatives and my wife’s elderly relatives have been catered for by the NHS. I have no doubt that there are exceptions where very bad professionals let people down, but the idea that there is systematic, willful failure in the NHS as a widespread problem is plain and simple rubbish and is motivated by people who are either over-demanding hypochondriacs who have been sent packing by overworked GPs, or they are right-wing idealogues who want GPs to work for £35K a year and do a seventy hour week.

      The bog problem in Primary Care is that since 2005 a huge increase in work has been shoved out of hospitals and dumped on GPs at the same time as their share of the health service budget has been reduced from 10.5% to 8.5% of the whole. This has resulted in most full time GPs working very long hours – usually around 70 a week. Part timers are paid pro-rata. If you do 50% of the working week, you get 50% of the income, so the fact that more women are working part time ought not to be an issue unless patients are so unreasonable as to demand a named GP at the time they like. In such a case, if they want a particular individual to attend to them, they will have to wait, won’t they. Maybe they should try the ‘free service’ available in Kentucky or other states in America where those not insured and without funds treat their cancers with poisonous plants and old wives remedies.

      • St Ignatius

        Having been taught alongside medics in training in some of my physics classes at university, I can tell you that their analytic skills wouldn’t command even £35k a year if it wasn’t a unionised profession.

  • Peter Stroud

    I agree wholeheartedly with Mr Thomas on the matter of women GPs. I am sure many patients find it more difficult to get appointments with women GPs, in general, because most are mothers and work only part time. But, clearly, it is a difficult problem to solve: unless the profession ceases to discriminate in favour of married women doctors.

    • macdoodle

      Do you have evidence to support your views that most female GP’s are mothers and work part time?? What a ridiculous statement. The NHS and GP would fall down without female doctors.

      • TommyCastro

        Of course but that doesn’t mean they are efficient. At least listen to the bloke on the inside, that would seem at least reasonabke.

      • Peter Stroud

        Certainly with respect to one typical, small town practice. Mr Thomas made the statement, I just reported my limited experience.

        • Vera

          We are not allowed a debate. To shut down debate by bullying and name calling from these so called clever educated people is an absolute disgrace. Well done GMC to stand up to them.

      • post_x_it

        In the same way that, as we are constantly told, the NHS would collapse without foreign doctors and nurses. Whilst this is an accurate description of the status quo, it is neither desirable nor sustainable in the long run. Alas, anyone who dares suggest that the situation be addressed by better long-term planning of training and hiring is instantly slapped down with “arguments” such as, “you should be grateful to all the foreign nurses and doctors, and now shut up”.

      • Gwangi

        Well, 95% of surgeons are male. Women prefer safe, people-meeting jobs like being GPs. Most visits to GPs are by women – the worried well, wasting everyone’s time and money.

        What the health service should be doing is going out into community’s for the sake of men’s health (innate instincts which are unchangeable mean men tend to soldier on and not visit a GP; women visit far too much as they have a low pain threshold – they take more time off for being sick too despite men being statistically sicker, and also most who retired early through illness are women, despite men being more ill).

        But just how much is all that GP maternity pay and leave costing the taxpayer eh? That’s the bottom line.

        Most extra cash for the NHS was wasted on absurd high pay rises for NHS staff – and they give nothing extra in return (try seeing a GP at weekends or out of hours!)

      • Vera

        But the argument is that training is very expensive and women do routinely work part-time if they can and retire early because of family commitments thereby costing twice as much to train as a man. Difficult to argue with that reasoning. My local practice is all women and I have no problems with it. All the doctors are excellent and I have no problem seeing my particular doctor, maybe not the same day but usually within the week. And I do find that women doctors tend to be more conscientious than men. But I accept that not everyone is so lucky with their GP.

    • 120176A

      The question is WHY do male doctors not want to be GPs?

      Or, maybe more fundamentally, why are medical school intakes dominated by women?

      You see, you reap what you sow: the UK has sown the seed of doctor bashing for so long, young men are making other choices. Women know they will likely marry, take career breaks, or go part time, so the problems do not seem to loom so large. They know they can go for the softer option of general practice, where career breaks will not be as limiting as say the incredibly long journey to becoming a competent surgeon. For a man who must believe medicine will be his number one focus, looking at the sh*te being doled out to doctors makes intelligent youngster think: ‘maybe spend the same effort becoming an investment banker?’

      Doctor bashing must stop for the above dynamic to change. But it won’t, so your troubles getting to see a GP, especially if for some reason you would prefer to talk to a man, will only increase. You reap what you sow.

      • Gwangi

        doctor bashing? Well a recent 40% pay increase should merit some gratitude, surely. And why shouldn’t doctors work evenings and weekends?
        It is absurd that our A&E departments are struggling because one has to book a GP apt 3 weeks in advance and one can never see a GP in the evenings and the weekends. GPs have been paid far too much and treated far too gently for far too long. If you are paid £100k a year, you cannot expect to work a 4 day week – you should be expected to work some weekends and evenings too.
        Most extra NHS cash spending of the last decades has been wasted on making well-paid rich doctors even richer. They are spoilt, frankly, and long have been.

        More females at medical school now coz it’s easier to get in – one can be rather average and get straight A grades in the tick-boxy A levels. It’s a safe option. Only 5% of surgeons are female though – that is way too tough and technical for most girls.

        • sdr1

          Recent 40% pay rise – you must mean 2004 as GP pay has gone down progressively since then. Maybe that is recent in your view.

          • http://owsblog.blogspot.com Span Ows

            …but it went with a reduction in working hours so no wonder bit by bit Blair’s idiocy is being corrected.

      • Vera

        I don’t think we are doctor bashing – the system is at fault not the front line staff. The NHS was set up at a time when immigration was very limited, our population far smaller and as it stands it cannot cope with today’s needs. Our doctors are already paid far more than in other countries, perhaps not including USA, and work less hours now than in the past, possibly because of the EU and Labour’s new contract in 2004. BUT if we are not even allowed to discuss it HOW WILL ANYTHING CHANGE?

    • Gwangi

      Yep, and many many millions of taxpayers money is wasted paying women to take time off to have babies in the teaching profession – the supply teachers cost a fortune and in teaching, they tend to give women 9 months to a year off on full pay (they don’t have to but deliberately exceed the legal requirements because teaching is not utterly feminised and ruled by women and feminists via unions.
      The maternity pay budget is over £4 billion a year, and much of that goes to rich property-owning middle class women with rich husbands who do not need it, We badly needs some means testing now – which takes into account property values.

      • christine

        why are you so mysogynistic? are women so vile in your eyes they seem to need punished for the audacity to live productive lives while facilitating the survival of the species.

  • WFB56

    There is so much in this article to applaud and so little in the opponents “arguments” that merit any respect that any potential NHS patient should be very worried.

    Most people in the NHS live in a coccoon of their own making where they continue to insist, in the face of all evidence, that the NHS is the envy of the world; God save us.

    • RODJ

      “In the face of all the evidence”
      The certainty with which people make points on areas they know nothing never ceases to amaze ma
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/nhs/10907823/Britains-NHS-is-the-worlds-best-health-care-system-says-report.html

      • post_x_it

        So, according to the headline, the NHS is the “world’s best health-care system”. Read on a few lines and you find that the study “examined 11 countries”. 11!! Out of around 200. Credibility: sub-zero.
        Try looking at some serious and credible research, such as the OECD comparison, and see where the NHS comes out.

        • Tom M

          I read somewhere that the CEO of the NHS is on the Board of the Commonwealth Fund.
          I imagine this report is the medical world’s version of “97% of scientists believe that……..”

        • gunnerbear

          My understanding was the at CF study was based on 11 comparable nations with the idea of comparing them to the US system (where health spending as a percentage of GDP is astronomic). Like all good stats and reports you can take yer pick as to what you agree with! 🙂 I think it is interesting to note though in terms of GDP spend the UK is behind nations like Germany, France etc….which are often used by all types of UK politicians as examples of the way forward. Those same politicians though of course never point out the fact that those countries spend more on their health services…….and that means either more direct payments by UK citizens at the point of use, increased taxation to provide funds for the NHS or the utter slashing of tens of billions of pounds from all other budgets to keep taxation down and get more funds into the NHS. I think all those choices are very difficult from a political viewpoint….as UKIP have now found out as they join the other parties dancing on the head of the pin and trying to pretend that fundamental change isn’t necessary or that we are not going to all have to pay more.

  • macdoodle

    So we are comparing his frankly ludicrous statements about women doctors and GP’s in general to Stafford??? So they’re dangerous?? I’d really like to see that evidence. A step too far. He’s not a whistleblower (well not unless they want to get rid of all female docs and GP’s……..oh). He is an arrogant misogynystic rascist twat!
    Just now ·

    • john studd

      More women are admitted to medical school because they have better grades for both undergraduate and postgraduate entry but this does produce a later problem with part time work , early retirement and pregnancy leave which should not be ignored or brushed aside by macdoodle’s vile insults. Thomas does not deserve that.I have a great loyalty to the Royal Marsden whose medical staff have cured me of 2 cancers but the management needs to acquire some guts to support courageous medics who are trying to improve a system that is in dire need of review.

      • Hektor Odrezak

        AH! He’s right because the unit treated you? Strange. He is entitled to his opinion, but so am I. His remarks about GPs were totally inappropriate. If not, why are many countries trying to change to our system? Even France now!

        • Hamburger

          His points about female doctors are unfortunately relevant. Throughout Europe there is an over proportional level of young female doctors. Many will, correctly, want to have children and will therefore want to work part time or in a field where demands on their time are regulated. Unfortunately that is not compatible with the work burden in hospitals. Complaining that the point is discriminatory will not solve the problem.

        • Vera

          Oh please! Grow up!

        • john studd

          Dreamer
          No country wishes to copy our system

    • ButcombeMan

      If Thomas really did say:

      “Family doctors are increasingly unavailable to their patients”

      He is undoubtedly correct.

      Is that the fault of the profession or of the ludicrous GP contract negotiated by NuLabour?
      *********************
      And the increasing lack of availability of GPs has a knock- on effect, most notably, in A&E.

    • Vera

      Racist? How is he racist? Back to name calling, pathetic.

  • Howe Synnott

    Doctors would expect that any theory/proposition be put to the test – can the claims of Dr Thomas be objectively tested?

    • post_x_it

      Of course they can, but that would be the last thing that his detractors want, lest some of them turn out to be true. Much easier to slap him down and tell him to shut up.

  • beenzrgud

    In my experience GPs in the UK are nothing more than a barrier to be overcome in order to get the tests and treatment that should actually be a first port of call. Research has shown they regularly fail in diagnosing life threatening illness, often leading to the unnecessary deaths of their patients. They will of course defend their occupation to the last, even to the detriment of their patients. Their ivory tower will eventually be torn down and I’m sure in the future we will wonder how we ever tolerated such a bunch of blowhards.

    • Hektor Odrezak

      “Research has shown….”

      A reference or two might help?

      • beenzrgud

        Look it up yourself, I’m not your dada.

        • Oddsbods

          If you get caught out- just try to brazen it through eh?

          • beenzrgud

            If someone can’t even look up GP referral info then there’s no point talking to them. Get it ?

    • lailahaillallah

      “in my experience”…. come on, do share.

      • beenzrgud

        I’m not sharing my medical history with you or anybody else on this forum.

    • Vera

      Bit sweeping? I’ve no doubt some practices are awful, but mine (all women) is excellent and I thank my lucky stars.

      • beenzrgud

        I’ve had equally bad experiences with both men and women. I’d be happy if they could at least diagnose the problem when I see them. So far it’s been like the blind leading the blind.

  • Lapin

    Like many hospital doctors and the author of this article, Thomas doesn’t have a clue about general practice. GPs handle at least 85% of all medical care (DH figures) for 8% of the NHS budget. The UK model of primary care is widely admired and a key reason why the NHS consistently tops independent international comparators of healthcare systems. Thomas knows nothing about a sector about which he claims expertise. He is not a whistle-blower: it is an insult to the brave whistle-blowers of Mid Staffs to mention him in the same breath. He is the epitome of medical arrogance and of conceited ignorance masquerading as expertise. It takes a special sort of credulity to mistake this for courage.

    • john studd

      UK and Denmark have the worst cancer results in Europe in spite of excellent hospital facilities and staff.`These are the only countries where a patient has to go through a “gatekeeper” the GP before seeing a specialist This can be a long delay – alas for a GP appointment and then a hospital appointment. A woman with a breast lump should go straight to a breast expert. If a man pees blood he should sees urologist pronto.And so on . That is the only way we will improve results
      And don’t doubt Prof Thomas’ courage It takes a brave man to criticise the powerful GP lobby in a society which only pays lip service to free speech

      • Lapin

        It is not suppressing free speech to correct gross errors in his assertions. And rates of death from most cancers are remarkably consistent across the developed world, including the US. Some countries diagnose earlier but this does not translate into more years of life for patients, only more years living with cancer.

        • john studd

          What nonsense So early diagnosis of cancer not important !!
          We can relax then with no cervical screening and no need for prompt investigation of suspicious symptoms Grade 1 or 4 tumour ?? What the hell lets relax and mother nature will put it right

          • Hektor Odrezak

            Look at the figures, Lapin is right, you Layman.

          • john studd

            No Hektor Not a Layman-if that is an insult for non -medic

          • lailahaillallah

            You must be a layman as you clearly have not the faintest grasp of the issues.

          • john studd

            I have a considerable grasp of reality and the long term problems of the `NHS if we fail to sort out
            Exploitation by large number of foreigners with their families whose first stop is the NHS
            Avoid the recurrent delays for cancer treatment -not entirely the fault o the gatekeeper delay i.e. GP
            More Medical school places for British 6th formers to do medicine rather than steal doctors from the 3rd world where they are most needed
            I am sorry but remove the gender sex bias at medical school entry Yes I know girls have better grades and may be brighter but we need well trained doctors to work longer with possibly later retirement in the NHS

          • Les Folds

            Could not agree more with the train more in the UK aspect of your comment. My son is applying to study medicine and in most cases there are 4000 applicants for around 130 places at med school. Most applicants will have the necessary 3 As at A level but are weeded out by other means to leave so many disappointed. Then we find that the commissioning body has miscalculated and we buy in doctors from around the world because it is cheaper than training our own. Of course investment is needed in new training places but we should as a nation be able to provide enough doctors to meet our national needs.

          • warmingmyth

            Always a difficult and contentious area.
            Perhaps the time to treat cancer is some five years before it becomes detectable by imaging:
            http://www.japaninc.com/mgz_winter_2005_medical_maverick

          • Statman

            Read my reply to Lapin and see if you agree.

          • lailahaillallah

            No- we don’t agree with you. Go back to buying the Daily Mail

          • john studd

            You are a comedian

        • Hektor Odrezak

          Hi Lapin,

          Are you the same one from DNUK perchance? I used to post there. (By a different name.)

          CW

        • lailahaillallah

          You cannot expect the anti-GP mental pigmies posting on here to understand that Lapin, but good try.

          • Vera

            Why resort to insults?

      • Bring Back Free Speech

        Exactly. And it is not coincidence that Meirion Thomas is an oncologist. It is late referrals by GPs., many of whom see cancer tests as an optional extra to educated guesswork, which sees Britain at bottom of the cancer survival pile in the Western world.
        Typical socialist response to someone pointing out failings of socialist health system: shoot the messenger. MeirionThomas is a brave and honest man – the bullies have succeeded in silencing him – keep quiet or you will lose your job. Disgraceful.

        • Hektor Odrezak

          Check your facts before exercising your right to free speech.

          • Bring Back Free Speech

            I lived there as well as here , you fool.

          • lailahaillallah

            So you are an expert because you lived there? Hmmm. Fitter.

          • Terry Field

            I lived there and left, in part because of the DREADFUL standard of service in the ‘elf.

          • Vera

            As we are all patients at one time or another, we all have stories to tell, and we don’t need your permission to tell them.

        • Vera

          Yes, I am filled with horror at the reaction of these so-called, clever, well-educated doctors, who wish to close down debate on the NHS. I wouldn’t want to be a patient of any of them.

          • Terry Field

            The system breeds arrogant bastards

      • Hektor Odrezak

        WRONG, WRONG and WRONG again. How long can a woman “sit” on a breast lump before it adversely affects her prognosis? 2 weeks?
        No- 12. Makes a mockery of your posting. As it happens, the UK has a 2 week urgent cancer referral pathway that means you CAN be seen within about 2-3 weeks of presentation.

        As to the cancer stats, the UK is probably the ONLY country that keeps accurate figures, as we have a “national” Health Service with number crunches these things.

        It is frequently alleged that we have worse outcomes than Europe for cancer survival, Stroke, and Cardiovascular disease. So, WHY, do we have the same life expectancy in the EU, plus or minus a few months? Only Sweden does better.

        • post_x_it

          The “urgent cancer referral pathway” is only useful if your GP takes your condition seriously and refers you straight away. If (as happened to me) your GP repeatedly, over a period of months, tells you not to worry, take some paracetamol and go home, then the moment of “presentation” becomes the issue rather than the referral period.

          • lailahaillallah

            Give us some examples please and then we can check them against the current UK 2 w referral guidelines.

          • Vera

            Time and time again, GPs send patients home with ‘take a painkiller’, and not just for cancer. They do it when they don’t know and can’t be bothered to investigate any further. You don’t need specific examples, just ask around.

          • post_x_it

            Forgive me for not wishing to discuss the intimate details of my case in this forum.

      • Statman

        See my reply to Lapin and see if you agree.

      • lailahaillallah

        Uk and Denmark are probably the only 2 countries with an accurate database.

    • McQueue

      Becoming offended rather than engaging with the argument is not the response of someone with a strong argument…… So I applaud your use of data but would like to further consider the quoting of 8% of the budget. GPs are dealing with many chronic conditions and essentially offering expert triage, filtering out the minority that need more expensive treatments on the hospital p&l. The burden of management costs also sits primarily on hospitals, and if anything requires addressing it is surely the runaway costs in management.

    • HJ777

      The UK model of primary care is widely admired and a key reason why the NHS consistently tops independent international comparators of healthcare systems.

      On the contrary, the NHS consistently does poorly in international comparators of healthcare systems:

      http://www.oecd.org/eco/healthcaresystemsefficiencyandpolicysettings.htm

      “The quantity and quality of health care services remain lower than the OECD average while compensation [i.e. pay] levels are higher.

      http://www.healthpowerhouse.com/files/ehci-2013/ehci-2013-uk.pdf

      “British Healthcare ‘amongst the poorest of Western European countries’ “

    • warmingmyth

      One of the factors involved may be the difficulties for general practice in London as opposed to the rest of the country. Indeed even in the rest of the country standards of care and problems in delivering general medical services vary widely. It might be helpful if the level of debate on all sides was raised above the level of name calling.

    • Statman

      Tosh. What planet do you live on.?Every external assessment of our health service for the last 20 years has shown it to be one of the worst in the western world and only just above Portugal and Greece.eg in important issues such as cancer survival stats,in hospital infections, waiting times for surgery,AandE, care of old people etc.
      Recently politicians have eagerly grasped on to the report of the U.S. Commonwealth health think tank which puts our health service as top .The idiots of course swallow that rubbish. In reality this think tank is as unbiased as the BBC. It is a left wing think tank with a pro Obama care agenda. It’s figures were ripped to pieces by Forbes Magazine. To give just one exampl of many,,the perinatal mortality criteria in the US are far stricter than the UK. Applying their criteria to our service our rate would have doubled.
      If you think the mid staffs. scandal , or the appalling state of the labour run non health service in Wales is atypical then you are just addressing your own brainwashed psychology.
      Meiron thomas is a brilliant and internationally recognised cancer surgeon, who is right about what he said and like Julie Bailey of mid staffs,is being persecuted by vicious leftists and unscrupulous hospital beurocrats.
      Our GP service is a basket case and the sevice is well bellow that in other European countries. That is not the fault of GPs . As a result of immigration there are over 200000 new applications to go on GP books per year. Over a million people per year fail to get GP appointments and as a result A&E s are massively over congested.

      While people like Jeremy Hunt pretend for political reasons our NHS is good when it isn’t we will never be able to put it right.
      However I will give it one point it is one of the cheapest systems and will there fore always appeal to politicians.

      • lailahaillallah

        It is a left wing think tank with a pro Obama care agenda.

        Forgotten our anti=psychotic medication, have we?

        • Statman

          The problem with doolally twats like you is that in your inane fatuosity all you can do is produce insults as you are mentally incapable of advancing any coherent argument or quoting any facts.

          • Vera

            Well said.

    • Vera

      GPs are not gods – some good, some bad, but debate is good. Trying to shut someone up who has concerns is disgraceful. Having experience of medical care in France, it is far better than ours, our NHS could learn a lot from them.

    • ukcomment

      I know Meirion Thomas because I am lucky enough to be one of his NHS patients. Far from being ignorant about general practice or arrogant, Meirion Thomas is a leader in his field. He presides over a talented and dedicated team of specialists at a top London cancer hospital and has personally trained countless numbers of equally valuable NHS consultants. Thanks to the work of Meirion Thomas and others like him, The Royal Marsden is a massive NHS success story. So when he has something to say about the state of our NHS service, listen up. He knows what he is talking about – and isn’t afraid to tell it as it is. General Practice is one of the NHS’s worst kept racketeering secrets. Good for him for blowing the lid on it.

  • annoyedofbedford

    This is a curious one. I also don’t think Thomas is a whistleblower – his views relating to women doctors are exactly that ‘views’ & I guess Claire Marx (President of the RCS) must have a few things to say in terms of countering Thomas’ arguments.

    With regard to General Practice I think he’s stating the obvious – the current model for primary care is outdated, broken & no longer fit for purpose……I’m currently accessing the majority of my primary care through Ali Parsa’s Babylon app. £7.99 a month, telephone & FaceTime appointments plus onward referrals / prescriptions & I can see my records……why on earth isn’t this sort of thing being used as part of the NHS offer?

    • Lapin

      Because GPs receive £65-90 per patient per year and the average consultation rate is > 7 per person per year. So, at absolute best, GPs receive £13 gross per consultation and that’s allowing nothing for repeat prescriptions, admin etc (a massive workload which takes at least a third of a GP’s time). By the time all the costs of running a practice are subtracted, core general practice runs at a loss. There are many GPs who are as frustrated with the current model of care as you and who agree that online access to appointments, patient records etc should be a no-brainer. The problem is that investment in general practice is falling while workload is increasing. Primary care has traditionally been one of the most innovative areas of medicine. For a start, GPs have had electronic patient records for 20 years, while most hospitals still rely on paper. At present though, innovation is being stifled by demand.

      • Hektor Odrezak

        And Bedford CCG is one of the most indebted in the country!

      • annoyedofbedford

        Agreed – the additional perversion being the tariff paid for an acute hospital encounter being equal to or just below the annual patient fee paid to primary care. The only way out I can see is dual funding innovation / an increase in primary care alongside maintaining current levels of secondary emergency care.

        If this works disinvestment in secondary care might (!?) be possible……no quick fix though!

    • Hektor Odrezak

      How does anyone examine you? (Not that physical examination is massively important these days, but it comes in handy sometimes.)

      • annoyedofbedford

        I think you hit the nail on the head – it comes in handy sometimes. The Babylon guys will advise if a face-to-face or exam is required but most of the time it isn’t.

        Babylon have partner organisations they can link you with &/or they can arrange for a nurse to visit. In fairness I think this is very much an early-stage development……with wearables like the iWatch the potential for this sort of service becomes much greater.

  • Nhs Whistleblowers

    NHS is a filthy business, in Lincoln County Hospital, three doctors were sitting at home getting their full salary for about six months while the NHS was paying £50-100 per an hour for others to cover them.

    The reason for suspending the first two doctors was because they blow the whistle. Instead of investigating the matter and improving it they suspended them then dismissed them !! The third one was the consultant who victimised the first two. Of course, he was stopped for six months then returned to do exactly what he was doing for the patients. Surprisingly the consultant (Mr Martin Clark) was not promoted like Andy Coulson to work in 10 Downing Street.

    The consultant was sitting at his home, getting his full salary (£200,000) a year and was doing extra money from his private work!!

    According to Mr Martin Clark, the other three consultants who covered him made lots of money as they were getting locum rate to cover him; one of them Mr Jason Niamat bought two top-of-the-range Range Rovers; one for him and one for his wife. The other consultant Mr Mark Buah got a top-of-the-range BMW. The Mr Wesam Aleid got top-of-the-range Mercedes and new home ..

    Despite the letters of complaints submitted against Mr Clark, he believes that he was intentionally suspended by the other consultants (Mr Jason Niamat, Mr Mark Buah and Mr Wesam Aleid) so they can get extra money.

    Mr Clark told one of the nurses, the next time one of them want to go in an expensive holiday, another complaint will be submitted against me and I will be suspended again!

    According to Mr Jason Niamat and Mr Wesam Aleid. Mr Martin Clark was suspended at least three times. It is claimed that Mr Clark lured one of the nurses to the hospital while they were both under the influence of alcohol and injection her with Botox. It is also claimed that Mr Clark made a wrong operation to a patient. He was supposed to remove a cancer from one side but instead he operated on the sound side of the body and left the cancer behind!

    This is not a joke .. go to http://nhs-whistleblowers.blogspot.co.uk/ or to twitter and check #ULHT and ULHT ..

    The two doctors who were dismissed went to court and the trust are now also paying to 5 barristers and 5 solicitors. Unfortunately for the trust, the whistleblowers kept tape recordings of what happened.

    This is reality .. this is where the money goes .. this was brought to the attention of Mr Jeremy Hunt, the COE of NHS confederation and the COE of the trust but nothing happened .. all covered up ..

    This is only a snapshot, from one Dep. in one hospital, in one year!!

    • onthetreadmill

      Never seen a Consultant earn £200,000 a year on the NHS, unless they were also Medical Director. Is the rest of the data opinion here as accurate?

      • Jane Martinsford

        Don’t be ridiculous, I know an orthopaedic surgeon at UCL who gets paid a basic of £212K per year. I saw his contract when he applied to rent a property in Central London and had to provide proof of earnings.

        • onthetreadmill

          There is no such thing as £212,000 per annum basic pay in the NHS.
          If he was doing waiting list initiative work, or had academic/managerial commitments that could increase it, but not to those levels.You are exaggerating.

          • Hektor Odrezak

            Hmmmm… if he had a big Clinical Excellence Award it doubles the NHS pay, does it not? And is pensionable I believe.

          • onthetreadmill

            Silver’s worth £46 000, gold’s worth about £58 300, and platinum is worth just under £75 800. Awards are pensionable.

            Do you really think an ENT surgeon in Lincoln is on a Platinum award?
            I know personally all the Orthopaedic surgeons at UCL and only Professor Haddad is on this sort of money. Note the title.

          • Jane Martinsford

            I’ve just checked this person’s employer’s reference and it’s actually a few grand more than that. Sorry to burst your bubble of naivety. London is not Lincoln.

          • Jane Martinsford

            Here’s an ad for a GP position in London … and it’s just a GP’s out of hours job … http://www.reed.co.uk/jobs/doctors-gp-out-of-hours-north-london/26229582#/jobs/justgp/p13540 lowest rate of £70 per hour x 7.5 hours per day x 261 working days per year = annualised salary of £137,025. Highest rate of £120 per hour = £234,900.

          • Jane Martinsford
          • post_x_it

            Forgive my ignorance, but annualising an hourly wage for out-of hours work doesn’t make sense to me. That would mean that somebody can have a full-time job doing nothing but out-of-hours work. Is that what you’re suggesting?

          • onthetreadmill

            GPs are not salaried employees of the NHS. And you are describing a locum position; no annual leave, study leave etc etc

      • Terry Field

        Plainly you know nothing. Also I refer to the ‘red’ book.
        The NHS is a Soviet model of health care – State control of almost all supply and capacity, State control of nearly all expert employees, State control of funding via general taxation only.
        It exists in this insane form nowhere else in the world.
        Any politician who says they support this system is a prostitute who sells the truth for the votes of the credulous.
        That makes nearly every British politician a prostitute.

        • onthetreadmill

          Thank you.
          I have been an NHS consultant for 20 years, Clinical Director for the last few, and sit on the panel allocating Clinical Excellence awards in a large National Tertiary care institution. Anything else you would like to add?

          • Terry Field

            Big deal.
            So you are a suit who does a little doctoring now and then.
            AND you puff you own self-importance.
            YOU and people like you have the most culpability.
            I bet you have sucked up to the Labour party to help yoru lounge-lizard skills and committee schmoozing.
            NOBODY is impressed by an employee of the system who sneers from above. You are shameful.
            Unless you subscribe to this insane soviet style madness, (that kills, fails to properly treat, abuses and lets down hordes of people whose shoes you are not fit to lick), which you may do since you have plainly done quite well from it, you have an absolute responsibility to tell people of the better modles found in more sophisticated countries.
            YOU are more guilty than the uninformed idiots.
            YOU are REALLY culpable.
            YOU are a disgrace.
            And I bet you have a tiny little willy.

          • Terry Field

            You are an arrogant puffed up advertisement for the moral bankruptcy of the health system. That you support this truly murderous soviet style system, whilst sneering with your faux superiority at others who have sniffed you out makes the stench you emit even more unpleasant. You endorse the view that the foul system is run for the employees. As for consultants, I assume your mouth was also ‘stuffed with gold’ in the words of a certain Labour politico, a party you no doubt suck up to for personal advantage.
            Your puffed ‘expertise’ cuts no ice – we are talking about a structure, a system.
            Not your bloody assumed status.

          • Terry Field

            You are a suit who lives off the system. Shameful. You must be a big cheese and rally corruptly powerful, as other criticisms of you are removed with no reference!!!! Power and corruption goes together,

      • Terry Field

        AND THIS COMMENT DESERVES NOT TO BE CENSORED, i do not endorse it but it should not be censored:

        NHS is a filthy business, in Lincoln County Hospital, three doctors were sitting at home getting their full salary for about six months while the NHS was paying £50-100 per an hour for others to cover them.

        The reason for suspending the first two doctors was because they blow the whistle. Instead of investigating the matter and improving it they suspended them then dismissed them !! The third one was the consultant who victimised the first two. Of course, he was stopped for six months then returned to do exactly what he was doing for the patients. Surprisingly the consultant (Mr Martin Clark) was not promoted like Andy Coulson to work in 10 Downing Street.

        The consultant was sitting at his home, getting his full salary (£200,000) a year and was doing extra money from his private work!!

        According to Mr Martin Clark, the other three consultants who covered him made lots of money as they were getting locum rate to cover him; one of them Mr Jason Niamat bought two top-of-the-range Range Rovers; one for him and one for his wife. The other consultant Mr Mark Buah got a top-of-the-range BMW. The Mr Wesam Aleid got top-of-the-range Mercedes and new home ..

        Despite the letters of complaints submitted against Mr Clark, he believes that he was intentionally suspended by the other consultants (Mr Jason Niamat, Mr Mark Buah and Mr Wesam Aleid) so they can get extra money.

        Mr Clark told one of the nurses, the next time one of them want to go in an expensive holiday, another complaint will be submitted against me and I will be suspended again!

        According to Mr Jason Niamat and Mr Wesam Aleid. Mr Martin Clark was suspended at least three times. It is claimed that Mr Clark lured one of the nurses to the hospital while they were both under the influence of alcohol and injection her with Botox. It is also claimed that Mr Clark made a wrong operation to a patient. He was supposed to remove a cancer from one side but instead he operated on the sound side of the body and left the cancer behind!

        This is not a joke .. go to http://nhs-whistleblowers.blog… or to twitter and check #ULHT and ULHT ..

        The two doctors who were dismissed went to court and the trust are now also paying to 5 barristers and 5 solicitors. Unfortunately for the trust, the whistleblowers kept tape recordings of what happened.

        This is reality .. this is where the money goes .. this was brought to the attention of Mr Jeremy Hunt, the COE of NHS confederation and the COE of the trust but nothing happened .. all covered up ..

        This is only a snapshot, from one Dep. in one hospital, in one year

  • Nhs Whistleblowers

    I’m a member of staff in Lincoln County Hospital, patients who were clearly diagnosed with cancer were discharged. One of them was discharged because Mr Martin Clark was running late on the clinic. The issue was raised with other consultants Mr Wesam Aleid and Mr Jason Niamat. They both said, this has been going on for ages. At least 5 patients were identified in a very short period .. These cancer patients were diagnosed at very early stage by their GP and they would only need straight forward surgery under local anaesthetic to remove the cancer once and for ever .. but they were discharged and left so the cancer can spread and then they died The issue was raised with the CEO Mrs Jane Lewington but never investigated. They made their best to keep all the concerns off records so no one can prove that there were concerns. Up till now, we do not know how many patients died because of this and how many patients out there !! Mr Suneil Kapadia the Medical Director was also informed but nothing happened apart from the cover up .. This is not a joke .. go to http://nhs-whistleblowers.blogspot.co.uk/ for the full stories or go to twitter and check #ULHT and ULHT or for more stories ..

    • Bring Back Free Speech

      Good for you for having the courage to speak out. The NHS needs more people like you. It is riddled with cover-ups.

    • Hektor Odrezak

      Brave of you to post this. I have heard it somewhere else. Strange our resident GP-haters are silent on this one?

    • Rhys

      I have an appointment at Mr Clark’s clinic next week. Should I cancel it?

  • willshome

    Dr Thomas appears to be one of those surgeons who believes he is right about everything. I’d suggest he considers the possibility that while he may be right about some, infallibility is always a poor diagnosis.

  • RODJ

    Meiron Thomas isn’t a whistle blower. He just isn’t. And the idea that ‘all women end up part time’ is rubbish. There’s so little to like in this article. Behind every NHS article there is always the assumption that the NHS is awful. This too is untrue
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/nhs/10907823/Britains-NHS-is-the-worlds-best-health-care-system-says-report.html
    We are lucky to have the system we have. Of course like everything it needs continual improvement but Meiron Thomas is not some oppressed superhero. Most doctors are as cynical as you come and leap to the defence of the average whistleblower.

  • RODJ

    Gosh the attack on GPs is relentless. I think before you have overwhelmingly strong opinions about GPs and the NHS you should go and find a few facts
    1. How much do you think it costs a GP to look after a patient for a year (please compare this to the cost of insuring your hamster)
    2. How much do we spend (of our GDP) on healthcare compared to the US? Compared to France?
    3. How many hospital beds to we have in this country compared to comparable western european nations?
    4. How many doctors do we have?
    You will find that contrary to your daily telegraph/spectator/mail propaganda we spend a lot less on our healthcare than other countries (the US spends an inordinate amount and we spend a lot less than france). GPs are tremendous value for money and we don’t have that many beds or doctors.
    All I want for christmas is a slightly more numerically literate right wing press…

    • Bring Back Free Speech

      And I think you should experience the health care systems in other Western countries. I lived on the Continent for several years, and the healthcare system is incomparably better – twice as good for a 20% higher outlay. No money spent on receptionists for GPs – you speak to them directly on the phone. They do blood taking themselves – no need for a nurse when it only takes two minutes, no umbrella organisation leaching money – they are completely independent, and you choose them, not vice versa. Blood test results within 24 hours, referral to the consultant of your choice within a week, open late etc etc

      • RODJ

        Well it isn’t twice as good by any measure (other than your own individual subjective measure). But with a 20% higher outlay (approximately 20 billion pounds) I’m sure the NHS could do better on the touchy feely aspect of healthcare. Even if we had 20 billion pounds I wouldn’t be getting GPs to anwer phones directly or do their own bloods though.
        Lets be clear giving a patient what they want isn’t always the best thing. Read about the anitbiotic prescribing practices of the US and france. They prescribe far too much, contributing to resistance, no doubt to keep punters happy.
        As it happens I’ve worked in australia, new zealand, america and the UK and ‘experienced’ healthcare in france but personal anecdote is not what we need – we need hard facts.

        • Hektor Odrezak

          Right again RODJ, but you cannot reason with unreasonable people.
          I wonder what Mr Thomas, or someone like him, would do by way of history, and examination with a 23 yr old nullip who presents with BTB in week 3 of her OCP. (Let’s say Microgynon 30.) Perhaps we should e-mail him?

          • john studd

            What a daft example !
            It is not his specialty but it is mine Answer Do nothing but reassure and continue the pills.An easy case for Hektor

          • David S

            That’s pitiful. Trying to impress people with a string of TLAs. If it’s Bovine Tuberculosis you should take it seriously, if you need an acronym to describe bleeding or the menstrual cycle on a general interest website you are part of the problem with medicine, not part of the solution.

      • Hamburger

        I presume you were not in Italy or Austria. It is not all wonderful here.

    • Hektor Odrezak

      Well said RODJ

    • 120176A

      No insight. None.

      Like why are some 500 GP practices at risk of closure?

      Or why GP training posts are vacant if there is such demand for GP services?

      Or why adverts for GP posts are not attracting applicants?

      If the job is so cushy, well paid and just generally ‘easy’, why does no one want to do it?

      Errr. Fail.

  • mjtoal

    Thomas is an out of touch arrogant fool. He knows nothing of general practice or, it seems, women doctors. Rather than paint him as a brave whistleblower, see him as what he is, a bilious old dinosaur in the mould of Sir Lancelot, stuck in an ivory tower issuing his proclamations through the Daily Mail. That should be clue enough, given the Wail’s campaign against GPs. Sounds like he might be trying to shift the blame for cancer mortality rates back to GPs, but he is the one doing the surgery, at least when he isn’t down at his private practice or addressing his epistles to Paul Dacre.

    • Vera

      More name calling – it’s you who comes over as arrogant and bilious.

      • mjtoal

        Well Vera, you may not know much about the NHS but you know what irony is. Or do you?

  • ashieuk

    I’m sure we’re all in favour of whistle-blowers exposing bad practice. What this bloke did was write nasty, spiteful opinion pieces. Nowt at all to do with whistles – blown or otherwise.

    • Vera

      Is he not allowed an opinion? Obviously not by you.

      • ashieuk

        He most certainly is. As are those who disagree with him.

  • Tom M

    I can understand the Medical Establishment’s reactions to Professor Thomas’ articles. At one end of the scale it has to be seen that whistleblowers are listened to and protected. At the other end if you condone these activities too much you will have a never ending queue of people waiting to publish their particular view upon what is wrong with the NHS. Neither is an acceptable situation to be in when trying to maintain public confidence.
    If that was what they were doing when they criticised his articles then I would like to presume they were taking action at the same time to confirm and rectify any shortcomings he may have highlighted.
    I suspect however on past “form” they were just trying to cover it all up.

  • Hektor Odrezak

    Look- this man was gratuitously bloody rude about GPs. A job about which he knows NOTHING. He is a tertiary-referral specialist. (And if you don’t know what that means, you shouldn’t be posting.) A GP might as well have said, “Let’s get rid of all sarcoma surgeons”. I mean, there are only a few hundred cases per year and a competent General Surgeon or Orthopaedic Surgeon could do jolly near as good a job.
    We had Blair/Brown appoint Lord Darzai- an endoscopic surgeon, to “sort out” General Practice. With the typical Islington-Centric view of the universe which comes from Westminster, we ended up with Darzi Centres, which are costing the taxpayer a fortune and providing not much different a service from the average GP practice.
    Should he be gagged?- nope. Most doctors realise the comments were those of a pillock straight out of the stable of Sir Lancelot Spratt, but the average Daily Mail, Telegraph and (perhaps) even Specator reader and journalist sees the word “Professor” or “Consultant” and thinks they are an expert on anything Medical. They AREN’T. Increasing specialisation means that they know very little indeed outside of their own narrow field.
    If you REALLY think he is that good, then call him next time you have a gas leak.

    • Dodgy Geezer

      …If you REALLY think he is that good, then call him next time you have a gas leak….

      If you REALLY think he is that wrong, then how about pointing out the places where his statements are in error, rather than complaining about him being rude, and the ‘wrong type’ of doctor…?

  • anyfool

    It is the same all over the public services, standards have dropped everywhere where there has been gender and diversity manipulation, nowhere more marked in health and education, the local authorities are well on the way to meltdown due to having too many non working workers.
    It would be alright if they had kept rigorous educational standards, but the old standards were changed, as were the metrics, they became feminised, we had people who cannot do the job, being pushed higher up the ladder where they could do less immediate damage, but as these incompetents reached critical mass we have disaster across the piece in public services.
    Only one way to correct this, it will take years, remove all the accrued employment rights that infect the public sector and start to make sacking a first resort for the blatantly incompetent.

    • Vera

      No one gets sacked in the public sector. It was ever thus. This must change. No private company would keep on people who do not belong, for whatever reason.

  • paulthorgan

    It seems impossible to insert a knife between the conduct of state employees in the USSR and those in the UK when it comes to exposing wrongdoing.

    The only difference seems to be that we in the UK have a private sector that forces standards up through competition in most fields except those which the state has chosen to run.

    • sdr1

      Competition inthe (private) energy market? I think not.

  • Malcolm Knott

    I do believe that he has a right to free speech but I don’t believe as a doctor he has the right to publish such inflammatory articles, and he has clearly breached his duties as a doctor.’

    How often do we hear that phrase? ‘I do believe he has a right to free speech BUT … [fill in special pleading to deprive him of that right].

    I don’t care if Thomas is properly classified as a ‘whistleblower’ or indeed a Welshman or indeed a professor. I want to hear people engage with his arguments, especially as I have a suspicion that some sections of the NHS are in denial.

    • Mr Grumpy

      Spot on. Do we ever hear “right to free speech” without the “but”?

  • Aberrant_Apostrophe

    The GMC Duties of a Doctor document states: 35. You must work collaboratively with colleagues, respecting their skills and contributions. 36. You must treat colleagues fairly and with respect. 37. You must be aware of how your behaviour may influence others within and outside the team.

    So, do rules 1 through 34 and 38 onwards have anything do with the patient, or are they all about the GMC looking after its own?

  • Polly Radial

    Almost all modern countries have nationalised railways and privatised healthcare.

    There’s a reason for that: affordability.

    Of course, we HAVE to do it the other way around – with predictable results.

  • Roy

    This reads like a Stalinist secret police exposé of the hospital system in Soviet Russia at the time of Solzhenitsyn. Along with the time honoured denial expected at the time. Never believing it could happen in Britain 70 years on.

  • susanne stevens

    Read Pulse med mag to see what is going on the re suicides of Drs under investigation

  • Colonel Mustard

    As soon as the representatives of power resort to saying things like “Perhaps he is just living in another — outdated — time, that is best left in the past” to suppress dissent and debate you know exactly where they are coming from and what their common purpose is.

  • Mrs Josephine Hyde-Hartley

    To raise a concern in a way that is positively acceptable is all about timing and place. Where and when and how can a member of the public raise concerns about their otherwise high-fallutin job/ profession, whilst at all times fully respecting the position of all stakeholders who may be concerned, equally?

    Use the M.P of course, for the purposes of direct accountability and responsibility and to openly reassure any who might otherwise be very interested or even appreciative of ones particular concerns but are apparently unable to help on the face of it (or indeed to your face).

  • Mrs Josephine Hyde-Hartley

    Really, it seems to me that any hospital based doctor should be glad that G.P,s are just that ie generalists- Somebody has got to work for the general member of the public,warts and all.

  • 120176A

    A deeply depressing saga. The unfair, deliberate, centrally-driven demonisation of GPs has resulted in a pseudo-religious belief that this group are almost universally overpaid, underemployed, incompetent, and now reactionary subversives.

    In particular, the most damaging, oft repeated canard which has become factoid: that average GP pay is some £108 000 per annum. There is a deep sense of weariness trying in vain to explain, yet again, how this figure includes hefty contributions towards pension (no longer final salary but career average related) NI and other practice running cost deductions that used to be EXCLUDED from commonly quoted figures for GP salaries. If one corrects for these, GP take home pay no longer looks that more attractive than any other civil service middle management role with a fraction of the responsibility. In the latter comparison, the employer’s (HMG) contribution is omitted.

    It gets more complex because GP practice is now itself a complex mix of small businesses (owned and run by partners) , salaried GPs and ubiquitous locums. The myriad waves of top down, ill thought out reorganisations, draconian demands for more and more reports, analyses, regulation and inspection, useless meetings and general insane bureaucracy have had the predictable outcome: no one wants to be a GP partner. No one. There are many willing to be salaried or to locum: but partner? Forget it! Some 500 GP practices will close or at risk of closing across the UK in the near future. Around 170 have already gone. Adverts for partners, even in traditionally sought after ‘nice’ areas are attracting no applicants at all. B@gger all.

    If the job were so easy, so lucrative and so cosseted, why does no one want to do it?

    GPs are drowning under a tidal wave of demand that was not budgeted, largely on the back of uncontrolled immigration and an ageing population: neither factor is their fault.

    Now to add to all the above, an out of touch academic working in one of the most rarified corners of medicine, takes some cheap populist shots at them. So you wonder why the outrage? Meirion Thomas is NOT a ‘whistleblower’. He is a buffoon. A caricature.

    People love to take potshots at doctors when they are healthy: ’twas ever thus. The attitude soon changes when facing desperate illness, and you know what, the vast majority of doctors rise to the challenge.

    The British public must wake up: the NHS attacks are not spontaneous. They are orchestrated. Combined with subtle internal sabotage. Why? To soften you up for privatisation as ‘the only answer’.

    • UKSteve

      Well, as a GP, you’ve ground your axe very nicely, but despite your protestations (£):-

      http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/uk_news/article25703.ece

      When I came to where I now live, there used to be a Saturday morning service at the local, large GP surgery (7 / 8 GPs?). There hasn’t been since, 10 years ago, and I hear many similar stories.

      The signing of the Lisbon Treaty removed all opt-outs that Major negotiated after Maastricht, including the Social Chapter, and thus, the working time directive. So doctors hours, esp. junior doctors in hospitals, were limited.

      I have had absolutely appalling service from GPs surgeries in the past couple of years, it was previously exemplary. I would imagine there are many and complex factors as to why. But I seem to be the only human being that ever saw the BBC1 prog in the “Real Story” strand, on BBC1 at 7:00 pm , weekday night, in 2004. It was presented by Fiona Bruce, and detailed several cases of health tourism, including a Thai man who had triple heart bypass surgery, with no entitlement whatsoever. The doctor’s attitude was, “if I get someone sick, I’m going to treat them.”

      Which is all very nice to indulge his professional conscience at the expense of the British taxpayer, but the NHS is a finite resource, for the exclusive benefit of UK citizens. Everyone else should pay the full whack.

      Addressing the absurd and surreal anomalies of booking patients in might be a good starting point, along with getting rid of some of the the bags who act as unhelpful and obstructive “receptionists”.

    • JimHHalpert

      Salaried GPs, who are expected to put in 50+ hours of work a week, which, admittedly, is a lot, make on average approx. £44.17 per hour. This gives a salary of £115236 ( http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/your-practice/practice-topics/pay/average-salaried-gp-rate-drops-by-10-per-hour/20005334.article ).

      Locum GPs and contractor GPs make *significantly* more.

      I also note that we only get this data thanks to First Practice Management’s independent survey. The official stats from HSCIC ridiculously combine figures for all GPs no matter how many hours they work per week.

    • Vera

      You mean you have to pay NI and towards your pension? Just like other people? My God, poor you. Who knew?
      There are obviously lots of things wrong with the whole NHS set up as it is, so let’s debate it, let’s get it out into the open and discuss it. The NHS is not a holy cow to be praised no matter what. So can you stop trying to close debate down by bullying, insults, pathetic name calling. You are not beyond criticism.

  • Terry Field

    The National Abuse Service, the local British religion, continues to be run for the unionised employees, and they can enjoy the ride a long as they do not object to the manifold obvious absurdities that the mini-Soviet model imposes.
    Tough.
    More idreadful s the shame of abuse and neglect it brings to the self-loading freight that is the lumpen population who so annoyingly appear and ask for – TREATMENT!
    The bloody nerve!
    Who do these bastards think they are!
    Giv’em a bit of ineffective Amox and tell ’em to bugger off!
    (Or bugger onto a corridor trolley to die quietly.)

    Envy of the world.

    I had hoped that UKIP would have had the political guts to be honest about the nature of the disaster and offer the solutions all the other corrupt politicians know are required but who lie all the time about the remedies.
    No chance.
    They bow down to the high priest of ritualised killing as well.

    • UKSteve

      UKIP? For them to have a policy on anything would be a change.

  • lailahaillallah

    When we finally establish Sharia Law in this country, it will all get better.

  • Gwangi

    This man’s article on health tourism was brilliant and exposed a massive scandal where millions or even billions of taxpayers money goes to pay for parasite health tourists who come to the UK specifically to get free treatment.
    Typical of the NHS, the unions, managers etc to want to silence the truth tellers. The abuse hurled at those speaking out about the Welsh NHS come in for particular abuse. To me, that suggests they are right in their criticisms.

  • ArthurSparknottle

    It is scandalous when serious issues relating to patient care can not be aired because whistle blowers are penalised by the management authorities, but is this case of that kind? I think not, as far as most of this chap’s announcements are concerned, and the reactions he has had, seem to me, in the main, to be merely the expression of views by his colleagues. Are they not entitled to disagree and if they think it necessary, to suggest that he is a nutter? What we see here is the reaction to a man who has denounced in general a whole class of his colleagues. This is not whistle blowing; not the airing of concern about specific malpractice, or management failure. The fellow simply has no respect for a large proportion of his colleagues and publishes articles denouncing them. Now – perhaps he is a prophet among ordinary mortals and is correct about all this, but somehow, I doubt it. In a generally highly regarded profession, what are the chances that the old guy denouncing everybody else is right and they are wrong???? So, my gut reaction is that he may well be a bit of a crank. The reaction is really only what you would expect from a profession ‘denounced’ by a maverick. You could suspect that most doctors are lazy, scoundrels and slobs who wouldn’t know a good day’s work if it slapped them in the face, but does this match your personal experience of the generality of the medical profession? It doesn’t for me. On the contrary, it is the opposite of my experience – anecdotal, I know, but that’s my experience. So – he makes pretty outrageous remarks in public, and loses the confidence of his colleagues, who roundly complain about the generalising, broad brush, derogatory remarks he makes about them. What else would you expect?

    • Statman

      Do you know it is typical of the low IQed twats like you that, disagreeing with Thomas ,you produce nothing resembling a coherent argument or containing any relevant countering facts. You disagree with the man then say why you stupid silly burk. What is so apparent with regard to those who oppose Thomas is the total lack of any coherent argument or the submission of any opposing facts.

      • ArthurSparknottle

        You need to calm down and read what I said. You might also try to refrain from using expletives; it undermines any case you might have.

        Notwithstanding Thomas’s reasonable complaint about health tourism, and the probability of specific, well founded complaints from other so called ‘whistle blowers’ about serious matters of concern, Thomas’s problems with his colleagues stem not from some specific issue, but from the fact that he appears to dislike the fact that women have trained for the profession in numbers and tend to work part time. Then he states that GPs are increasingly unavailable. If they are, and I have not found it so in dealing with the care of my very elderly relatives, it is because government re-organisation of NHS services has since 2005/6 increased the workload on family doctors by 30% by transferring the responsibility for dealing with very sick and vulnerable patients to GPs in the community. At the same time, the share of resources applied to the GP service has been cut from a 2005/6 level of 10.75% of NHS funding, to 8.39% of the total budget. Over 90% of NHS patient consultations take place in GP surgeries or in the patient’s home. These changes have meant that GPs are typically working twelve our days five days a week and have no funds to appoint more GPs to their practices to assist in dealing with the increased workload. If patients want GPs 24/7, then a vast increase in funding will be required so that many more of them can be appointed. It is blatantly unreasonable to expect people who are obliged already to work five twelve hour days without proper breaks to add to that by working nights and weekends.

  • trace9

    Dear me, in this Internet/Information Age it never ceases to amaze how feeble-minded the ‘British’ – the ordinary citizens, the Man in the Street, are. Against every Google Search result for each hospital, GP ‘surgery’ – almost everything NHS, is an invitation to ‘review’ it. That means TELL ALL about crappy eperiences & knowlege of others’! It can even be done anonymously so you’ll be spared all this post hoc fuss. After the typical bawling angst in some previous headline cases, more than once I have Googled the hospital concerned & of reviews, found ONLY a lonely invitation. Never taken up by the sheep who richly deserve their fate so dumbly unsignposted. Have I ever done as I suggest – yes, non-anon, & no consequences! Has Freddy Gray ever done this – naaawp I’ll bet. You pathetic jerks make me cynically sick – & yourselves clinically so.

    • JimHHalpert

      Tractor production is up again this month.

  • Amit Aggarwal

    The vitriol being hurled in the direction of Mr Thomas by other medical professionals, amply demonstrates that you don’t have to be terribly intelligent to go to med school. I say this as a medic myself, albeit one who has now left clinical practice. What is particularly depressing about this case is that the medical community is so willing to simply dismiss the views of a consultant who has worked at the proverbial ‘top of his game’ in a internationally renowned centre of excellence for decades. It matters not that Thomas is not a GP – he will have dealt with thousands of GP referrals throughout his career, both good and bad, and therefore is in a uniquely good position to have witnessed the shift in GP provision and skill over many years. But instead, we choose to label him as sexist, racist, somehow ‘out of touch’. This is rather similar to the debate we are now having over immigration – once the topic that dare not speak it’s name, but now being belatedly jumped on by all the political parties because things have gotten out of hand.

    Lastly, I would hope (but rather doubt) that Professor Majeed is being made to consider his position at Imperial. For him to use GP referrals of seriously ill patients to a centre of excellence as a political football, is nothing short of irresponsible and disgraceful, and I rather wish the Royal Marsden Hospital has displayed some courage and told him where to go rather that placing Thomas on temporary gardening leave. In any case, if there is something which warrants referral to the GMC, it is Professor Majeed’s conduct here.

  • WFC

    The main problem with Dr Thomas (or are surgeons still “Mr”?) is that he has failed to recognise that modern public-sector “English” means the opposite of what it appears to mean.

    Thus, whilst “diversity” means “strictly enforced uniformity” and “multiculturalism” means “whatever we want it to mean from day to day”, so too does “transparency” mean “shut up, or else”.

  • Control Freak

    Has anyone else noticed the relevance to the attacks on Mr Meirion Thomas of the recent piece here on Stepford Students? Judging by some of the reactions, the Stepfords have already moved out of the Universities and into the role of the righteous, with a mission to insist that all is well in the State monopolies and that no one has the right to suggest otherwise. Mr Meirion Thomas essentially complained that GPs were not organised, equipped and trained properly; hardly a personal attack on their integrity. Insofar as he offered any personal criticism, he commented that, “too many GPs no longer try
    to provide an even remotely personal service, to offer appointments at
    convenient times or to take effective responsibility for continuity of
    care” – do his critics really think they can defend Byzantine appointment systems? I don’t know about you, but I don’t manage to plan my illnesses two weeks in advance.

    Many of the critical comments are clear manifestations of the Stepford mentality; the concern that the high proportion of women undergoing medical training is leading to shortages in care as those women cut back on working hours to look after their families is dismissed as a “view” because it offends the Stepfords. Those who claim to have a better knowledge of the GP system that Mr
    Meirion Thomas ought to be able to cite statistics showing the proportion of male and female doctors who, say 10 years after graduation, are in full time and part time practice. The fact that his critics can only resort to taking offence suggests that the statistics are on Mr Meirion Thomas’s side.

    Those suggesting that patients be used as pawns, to starve Mr Meirion Thomas’s hospital into submission, are beneath contempt.

  • Vera

    The NHS is sometimes wonderful, sometimes dreadful and criticism must not be shut down by bullying tactics. If no one can criticise how can anything improve?
    Disgraceful tactics by these so called doctors, they should be absolutely ashamed of themselves. These days the NHS often seems to be more for the benefit of the staff, and less for the patients. We cannot even be ill at weekends now because doctors only work Mon-Fri.

  • Mark York

    Nah. This article won’t wash. Thomas now says he’s a martyr and that he’s being victimised. But the truth is that he’s been abusing his status as a senior surgeon for a very long time to peddle his distorted bigotry and mislead the general public through the mass market “Daily Mail”. His employers and the medical authorities now need to take properly effective firm action to restrain him.

  • WarriorPrincess111111

    It would be easy to discount all that Dr. Thomas claims – except for the huge number of complaints now being made against the NHS.
    Surely only those colleagues to whom his accusations refer would give rise for them to complain, and only then if the accusations were true. For the dedicated and honest medical professionals, of which there are many – such allegations would not affect them.

  • RWJ

    Its state funded but not answerable the public who fund it. The same can be said for the BBC……..and we call Russia names LOL.

  • RWJ

    This story plus the story about policing in certain parts of England that cannot be done over weekends……..shows what a disgrace a Tory government has made the this country. The UK….the laughing stock of the world thanks to Cameron.

  • mike photo

    The National Health Service was a highly respected throughout World that is nowness the case. As with everything in the Uk we fail to maintain and improve, we rest on out laurels while the ret of the World learn, catch up and then pass us by. The Government are unable to fund a seriously managerial heavy Health Service, red tape is the order of the day, large amounts of managers and decreasing nurses and medical staff is the norm. Look at the current situation at A&E with ambulances lining up waiting to be seen – and as usual no one will take responsibility to sort it out. It is a National disgrace, adverse comments must be taken seriously and if necessary acted upon but no one has the hunger to see any change, as usual we stuck in a rut of complacency as is happening throughout the country

  • John Andrews

    The NHS has good principles but it is far too big. Break it up into Regional Health Services: RHS instead of NHS. Disaffected staff will then have alternative employers.

    • post_x_it

      Why not? They already do a splendid job running the Chelsea Flower Show each year.

  • Toni_Pereira

    This remindes me of Theodore Dalrymple’s last essay at The new Criterion:http://www.newcriterion.com/articles.cfm/Compliance-with-untruth-8052

  • fckdupathens

    Trying to get Governments and Organisations to address serious issues isn’t always easy.

    I approached the authorities here in Greece when the President of an NGO who’s Directors worked for the state tried to defraud the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and who was also illegally pretending to be a Doctor and got stonewalled by the Health sector, lied to and threatened by all involved and sued when they were exposed in the Papers and on air in a radio broadcast.

    It took five years to go to court whereby the people running this bogus NGO and sector still masquerade as something they are not to abuse civil liberties and the patients they use for funding whilst gaining access to highly sensitive HIV/Aids data for their own gain.

    Recent cases whereby the details of people with HIV/Aids were handed over to the press here who abused their confidentiality highlight not only the state sponsored abuse of the sector but how they persecute and abuse those who stand up to it.

    I was fortunate in being declared innocent of helping unmask criminals who have abused the state for over 15 years and yet this farce still goes on, protected by the other NGO’s affiliated within this sector ond the International Organisations who allow these people to shelter under their banners for credibility!

    https://fckdupathens.wordpress.com/2013/05/01/lies-cover-ups-and-censoring-the-truth-welcome-to-the-greek-hivaids-sector/

    https://fckdupathens.wordpress.com/the-truth-actup-greece/

  • BILL ROB

    The trouble is that it’s not just happening in the NHS. Any thing to do with local authorities is under the same threatening umbrella. The amount of things happening or being done that do or could cause serious potential problems are hardly ever brought to light because of fears of repercussions. Whistleblowers have no future within these organisations being under the threat of breaking their contract. Local authorities are no better than National organizations like the NHS. Always trying to cover up, or “assassinate” anyone at any level, who decides that honesty has to be made available to the public. These self righteous pr@tts think they know what’s best for the rest of us. How long are they going to be allowed to get away with being control freaks?? Bloody outrageous!!

  • rtj1211

    I’m afraid the only way things get sorted is internally. You need someone to collect 5 year data on the situation of relevance (e.g. outcomes in certain surgical procedures collecting data on all kinds of variables) to provide irrefutable evidence to the Trust Board and Head of Surgery that the Unit is not performing to national guidelines or within the law (whichever is relevant).

    The collection of data is merely evidence-based medicine, which no medic can argue with.

    The analysis of that data is at such a simple level that no-one can argue with that either.

    So no-one can argue with the data once it is collected.

    The issue is who got killed, treated badly etc etc in the 5 years it took to collect the data, since you probably knew there was a problem up front or you wouldn’t be collecting the data.

    If things are really bad, maybe the statistics show up after 1 year. But usually it’s going to be 3 – 5 years.

    If the fact of the matter is that raising things internally causes you to lose your career or job, then it says that the Hippocratic Oath means nothing and senior doctors and administrators are actively acting contrary to that oath in puerile power games.

    I’ll leave it to others to say how often that takes place…….

  • misomiso

    Really good article.

  • JSC

    Isn’t this the entire idea of all socialised services? Silence the whistle-blowers, fiddle the stats, appear efficient, profit.

  • sanur seo
  • Mynydd

    I think there is a misunderstanding of Mr Hunts role. He is not there to improve the NHS but to keep the NHS off the front pages until the general election.

  • Retired Nurse

    Thomas didnt upset the ‘Medical Establishment with his comments about female part time GPs, he upset Sara Wollaston ‘wife , mother , GP , MP and Health Minister

    ‘ – and she is in a position to do very nasty things (albeit on a part time basis) …

  • CitymanMichael

    I had given up on journalism in the UK until I read this from Freddy Gray – absolutely excellent work, Freddy, you are a light in the darkness.

  • Tali

    Hate to jump in spammer style, but I just opened a new shop and would love for you all to drop in and check us out! https://www.etsy.com/listing/217530624/fat-to-the-bone-hipster-t-shirt-beards?

  • Terry Field

    The NHS is a Soviet model of health care – State control of almost all supply and capacity, State control of nearly all expert employees, State control of funding via general taxation only.
    It exists in this insane form nowhere else in the world.
    Any politician who says they support this system is a prostitute who sells the truth for the votes of the credulous.
    That makes nearly every British politician a prostitute.
    AND A SERVING LABOUR HEALTH SECRETARY SAID SO DIRECTLY TO ME IN A BBC GREENROOM PRIOR TO A NEWSNIGHT CONVERSATION ON THE NHS!!!!!
    What bloody degenerates!

  • Gladiatrix

    I have an email from the RMH stating that Dr Thomas was not suspended nor was he asked to sign a confidentiality agreement/gagging agreement. Perhaps Freddy Gray would like to investigate this apparent contradiction.

  • G B

    I applaud Dr Thomas for making a stand and equally disgusted and disillusioned by the response he has received in the medical sphere. The cacophony of abuse that he has experienced is similar to their relentless inability to respect their patients views and engage in meaningful dialogue. If you criticise the system you are often subject to overbearing arrogance, discredited and discarded in a similar manner.

  • Manny Bartow

    Those who preach from the altar of man-made global-warming, like Al Gore, work to confuse natural climate change with man-made global warming.

  • http://www.whatyouneedtoknow.co.uk/ Andy

    Here’s our video about Whistleblowing at Work https://youtu.be/1SVIpDMk7fk

  • Trevor Smithson

    J.Meirion Thomas is the most astonishing competent and kind person I have ever met and a distinguished medical practitioner and educator: he literally saved my life. In 2003, after a long period of ill health caused by misdiagnosis he resected my abdominal sarcoma (a rare cancer) in a huge operation including multiple organ loss and I am remarkable recovered! The tumor wieghed a record 25.5 kgs – the man is a walking miracle and genius judged by fools. This is Sir Tim Hunt parallel: what they do not like is he is right – my case is but one of which he has had to sort out – but it’s all in a days work to him.

  • vanquezalvin

    My Husband that was highly infected with colon cancer with mets to other parts of the body, he was even given 6 months herbal medication by dr. Osas. Life for the family was a living hell with sorrow in the heart, but today iam shouting out to the world that the herbal medicine has saved my husband from dying. he is still alive and we are in the 10th month. God is so great to the Faithful.

    Thanks to Dr Osas that prepared the herbal medication for us that we used in curing my Husband.

    Once again I want to thank dr. Osas for his wonderful Herbal medicine. We are now happy family with my Husband back alive, strong and healthy. You can contact Dr. Osas on every sickness and diseases issue on his email: doctorosasherbalhome@gmail.com or contact his number via +2348112252378 or you can as well add him on whatsapp with same number.

    DOCTOR OSAS CAN AS WELL CURE THE FOLLOWING DISEASE:-

    1. HIV/AIDS

    2. HERPES

    3. CANCER

    4. ALS

  • youactasifstupiditywereavirtue

    The NHS has taken on a ‘them and us’ rather militant sort of attitude.

    Additionally I have found many NHS GPs to have rather a pompous sense of entitlement.

    In short I am not impressed.

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