Features

Inside the Milibunker: the last days of Ed

The Labour leader's court kept its fantasy alive right to the end

16 May 2015

9:00 AM

16 May 2015

9:00 AM

Ed Miliband was writing his victory speech on election night when the nation’s broadcasters announced the exit poll. He remained convinced — as he had been all along — that he was destined for No.10. In his defence, most people in Westminster thought the same. But within his ranks, a rebellion had already broken out. At 2 p.m. that afternoon, a member of his shadow cabinet had resigned — fearing not defeat, but the debacle that would follow Miliband’s success.

‘I was being briefed by Ed’s team about their post-election plans,’ the shadow minister told me. ‘It was nuts. They were explaining how there would be “no concessions”, no “tacking towards the centre”, nothing. The way the campaign had been run, the way his operation had been run, that would be the template for government. The whole Zen Labour thing. In the end, I lost it. I said to them, “Well, if that’s the way you’re going to do things, here’s where I get off’’.’

True to his word, Miliband stayed in his Zen-like state to the end. As one insider put it: ‘When he was working on his victory speech with Greg Beales [his speech writer] the exit poll was announced. They stopped, and someone came in and said, “Don’t worry, that poll’s wrong.” So they carried on writing.’

This is a tale of Labour’s downfall: the inside story of the party’s most catastrophic election campaign since the war. It’s a story of chaos, dysfunction and hubris.

Miliband is reputed to be a decent and approachable man. Nonetheless, fear and loathing were permanent residents in his inner circle. ‘I’ve never worked in a place with a more poisonous atmosphere,’ one aide told me. But that was a positively collegiate view compared to some of those expressed in the days after the defeat. ‘I want to gut them. I want to gut them all,’ a shadow cabinet aide told me, in reference to ‘colleagues’ in Team Miliband. His view is not an isolated one.

Much of the anger of Labour MPs, aides and officials is being channelled towards one question: how come no one saw defeat coming? Why didn’t anyone senior in the party’s campaign team spot the giant iceberg looming ahead?

The Conservatives spotted it. Perhaps not the full scale of their impending triumph, but they were certain (see Sebastian Payne’s article) that they were heading for victory. At about 10 a.m. on polling day morning, I phoned one of David Cameron’s senior advisers. He was the most relaxed I’d heard him throughout the entire campaign.

‘We’re pretty confident we’ve done enough,’ he said, adding that the estimate made at the weekend of 298 Tory seats had been raised to 302. I asked about the opinion polls, all of which showed a drift back to Labour. He laughed and said: ‘Wait until tomorrow morning. The polling companies are going to be in a lot of trouble’. So it was to prove.

A couple of hours later, I got a call from a Labour organiser in a marginal seat. ‘Are the Tories panicking yet?’ he asked.

[Alt-Text]


‘No,’ I replied. ‘Should they be?’

‘Yep. I’ve just had a call from Brewer’s Green [Labour HQ]. They’re certain they’re going to win Finchley and Golders Green.’ Taking Finchley — Margaret Thatcher’s old seat — would indeed have been a triumph. But the Tories won it with a crushing majority of nearly 5,700.

Labour’s failure to realise the true state of the ‘ground war’ was crippling. In the last days of a campaign, it is vital for the parties to have an accurate picture of what is happening in constituencies, so they can allocate workers and other important resources.

It used to work perfectly: in the old days, the Labour spin doctor Damian McBride used to win favours with journalists by sharing the party’s confidential internal polling, which was always spot on. This time, it failed. Miliband’s troops were effectively fighting blind. Blame for this abject failure of basic intelligence gathering has been viciously apportioned to several areas. Some are quick to point the finger at Labour HQ. ‘It wasn’t fit for purpose from day one,’ a shadow cabinet adviser told me. ‘The first day we turned up, we were told there weren’t enough workstations and some of us would have to spend the campaign working from home. Then someone discovered there was one mid-level official who still had a company car because he’d been with the party since the 1970s and that was still written into his contract.’

One MP pointed the finger at the party’s field operations, the army of organisers deployed to gather and feed back voting data to the centre. ‘Up until 2.30 a.m. on Friday morning we were still being told we were going to win the election,’ he said. ‘I was told, “Don’t worry, we’re getting the samples from the counts fed back, and they’re showing it’s okay. The exit poll is wrong. Our numbers are still holding up.” It was madness. All you had to do was turn on a TV and you could see we’d lost. At 2.30 a.m., I was in a Sky News studio and the presenter Adam Boulton knew what was happening. “Labour is saying the exit poll is wrong,” he said, off-air. “In a few hours, they’ll be wishing it was right.”’

The exit poll gave the Tories 77 more MPs than Labour and a minority government. David Cameron finished with a 99-seat lead, and an overall majority. Labour had not just misjudged the election, but the country in which the election was held.

Most of the blame, inevitably, is being aimed at the leader’s office. ‘When the campaign started we were told we had to clear all leaflet design past the leader’s office,’ said one party worker. ‘We thought that would be a nightmare, but for the first part of the campaign it worked really well. We’d email the art, and about an hour or so later we’d get the response, “Great. Go with this.” Then one day someone got the message, “Excellent. All good.” But when they went to respond they realised they’d failed to insert the original attachment. All the time, Ed’s team had been signing off the leaflets without bothering to look at them.’

Another Labour insider told of the scene in the press office when Miliband posed with the notorious Ed stone, the 8ft 6in slab of limestone upon which his six key election pledges were inscribed. When it appeared on TV, a press officer ‘started screaming. He stood in the office, just screaming over and over again at the screen. It was so bad they thought he was having a breakdown.’

But many MPs and aides believe the key to Miliband’s failure lies with his private polling operation, run by Stan Greenberg and James Morris. The latter appeared on BBC Newsnight this week to claim that he knew last year that things were going badly.

He doesn’t seem to have shared that hunch with his colleagues. ‘I sat in a room and saw Greenberg and Morris explain how it was structurally impossible — impossible — for us to poll less than 35 per cent in this election,’ said one. In the event, it was 30 per cent, against the Conservatives’ 37 per cent. A far cry from the tie predicted by most pollsters.

Another MP said: ‘The polling was the most sensitive part of the operation. That’s because it was the polling that showed Ed’s personal ratings. So they kept it very, very tight. Only about four or five people in Ed’s office had access to it and they didn’t like sharing it outside Ed’s team. In fact, it would be circulated in a way that meant those people would hold back bits of data from each other.’

This failure to compile or share accurate data proved catastrophic. In Yorkshire, hundreds of activists were deployed to Sheffield Hallam in an attempt to ‘decapitate’ Nick Clegg. But half an hour down the road was Morley and Outwood, the seat of Ed Balls. In the final days of the 2010 campaign, Balls telephoned an MP friend. ‘I’ve just had Alicia Kennedy [Labour’s deputy general secretary] on,’ said Balls. ‘She says I might be in trouble in my seat and I should get back there. What do you think?’

‘Get back there now,’ his friend said. Balls did and clung on by 1,101 votes.

This time, no call arrived. There are some in the Balls camp who think that was no accident. ‘The leader’s office had the polling data, and they sat on it,’ a Balls ally told me. ‘They knew what was happening nationally two weeks out, they knew what that meant for Ed’s seat. And they sat on it.’ The implication is that Miliband thought he would run a minority government after an election that might depose his shadow chancellor. And that he considered this no bad thing.

Others in the party dispute this. ‘Ed needed every seat he could. I don’t believe he’d deliberately let Balls go,’ said one MP. Another senior Labour official said: ‘Either Ed’s the best actor in the world, or he genuinely thought he was going to win right up until the end.’

This raises another fascinating and disturbing possibility. There is no doubt that Labour had evidence that the election was swinging away from them. On the Monday before polling day I spoke to a Labour insider who had been told, ‘This SNP thing is hurting us. We’re slipping. If it stops, we’re okay. But if it doesn’t, we’re dead.’

As we know, it didn’t stop. But did Ed Miliband know? Is it possible that his Zen-like state was in part the product of his staff’s inability to tell him the hard truth? ‘I think that’s possible,’ said one shadow cabinet member. ‘They operated like medieval courtiers in there. And Ed was convinced right until the final knockings he was going to win.’

Ed Miliband was an idealist until the end. He surrounded himself with academics, took inspiration from political textbooks and had an extraordinary ability to detach himself from the hue and cry of daily politics. He created his own world and lived in it. This explains his preternatural calm and his astonishing self-belief — but it also explains why he drove his party over a cliff.

Subscribe to The Spectator today for a quality of argument not found in any other publication. Get more Spectator for less – just £12 for 12 issues.


Show comments
  • Dogsnob

    Sweet. Love it, every word.
    Can I get this on audio for when I’m in the van? My white van?

    • alabenn

      Hodges has not mentioned the hundreds of councillors they lost, they were expecting to gain hundreds, this will hurt them badly at the next election, hopefully really badly.

      • Alexsandr

        and UKIP won some of them.

    • Ed  

      Cameron is starting to look like he might be starting on the kind of track record Stephen Harper now has.

      • Dogsnob

        You’re thinking I admire Cameron?

        • Ed  

          Ah, so you’re admiring Miliband. Admission noted.

          • Dogsnob

            That’s how desperate you are? There’s only the two options?

          • Ed  

            Desperate? Meh.

            The real question is what’s your third option? I’m of the view that part of Cameron’s majority is strategic voting by UKIP supporters opposed to Labour, and Cameron knows this. He’s spent the last couple of years tacking toward the Lib Dems, and he’s now going to spend the next four years tacking toward Nigel.

            Your deep thoughts?

          • Dogsnob

            Concur.

          • Kennie

            You mean copying or trying to imitate Nigel or at least UKIP’s policies and ideas.
            Everything that cast-iron Dave has said since before the election is what those “nasty loons and closet racists” have been saying for years. Now suddenly it is NOT racist to say things like ” I am quite clear, we must control immigration”

          • Ed  

            Heaven forbid a politician do what the people voted for. That would never do.

  • NBeale

    A campaign “run” by Douglas Alexander and Lucy Powell was always going to struggle against one run by Lynton Crosby and Jim Messina. Only the substantial bias in the UK electoral system prevented an even bigger defeat. Next time they could well lose another 50-100 seats.

    • Fraser Bailey

      Let’s hope so.

    • CharleyFarleyFive

      We can but pray.

    • Stuck-Record

      Incredible, isn’t it. Imagine Lucy Powell turning up for an interview at any normal place of work, let alone something in PR.

      After she left, you’d turn to your fellow interviewers, and say, “Was that just me, or is she a complete idiot?”

      • Commenthead

        Yes, she always struck me as utterly thick I must say.

    • Paddy

      Hope so!

  • BoiledCabbage

    Milliband won! Yes, only 36% [insert a figure] voted for Cameron, therefore Milliband won! Hence the demo outside No10, the looming railstrike, the………………..

    On another tack, if anyone sees a dub of ‘Downfall’ with Labour parody lines, pls let me know. It would be a classic.

    • richardvine

      Cant help you with the Labour “Downfall” but if you like cricket and KP this is priceless: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fNexLoG19rg

      • Icebow

        One can also find football and American ‘football’ versions.

    • Recce

      I remember one where the bankers bonus tax was going to be used to fix everything, but I’ve been unable to find it.

      But I have found this one of after Emily Thornberry made her tweet in Rochester: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LcVEUY8QlU

      The problem is googling for Ed Miliband and Downfall comes back with way to many hits these days.

  • Damaris Tighe

    Thank God they didn’t win. Just think what they’d have done to the country with that cut-off from reality.

    • DWWolds

      Just imagine the events of the past week had Labour regained power.

      Imagine the parade to Downing Street of those to be appointed to the Cabinet. Imagine that Cabinet sitting round the table in the Cabinet Office. Imagine a Labour Home Secretary dealing with the announcement from Brussels that every country in the EU should take a quota of the economic migrants washing up on the southern shores. Imagine a Labour Chancellor at a meeting of the EU finance ministers. Imagine a Queens Speech penned by Miliminor.

      No! Better not take that direction – it might give us all nightmares!

      • Damaris Tighe

        I feel ill …

      • Paddy

        Yes, I did imagine it.

        Miliband would have been ‘lording’ it just like Blair did.

        He would be working out where his picture was going on the stairs of Downing St. and putting the finishing touches to where his ‘stone’ would go. And, spending a fortune of taxpayers money refurbishing Downing St.

        Do you think he would actually do any work? I don’t. He would just sit-back in his zen-like state.

  • BillRees

    Ed Miliband may have been deluded about the result of the election.
    But that is just a symptom of a wider delusion.
    Anyone who believes the Marxist tripe that seems to motivate him has to be seriously misguided.
    The country has had a fortunate escape.

    • Ed O’Meara

      Marxist? There is a hair’s breadth in real policy difference between Labour and the Tories! You’re the misguided one!

      • MrVeryAngry

        True. But we have more chance in getting liberty and common sense back on the agenda with the Tory (conservative?) back bench than with a labour (socialist) one.

        • http://www.robinbrown.co.uk/ Robin Brown

          The belief that Miliband is ‘a Marxist’ is one of the most bizarre misconceptions to come out of this election.

          • Ed O’Meara

            The mud throwing and Tory propaganda of the Rightwing rags (which are now pretty much all of our papers except the Guardian and Mirror) is now accepted as fact.

          • Shazza

            63% of the British public get their news via the BBC.

            The BBC went into overdrive to ensure Labour’s victory. Andrew Marr, he of the attempted Cameron smear regarding fox hunting is on record as saying that the corridors of Broadcasting House were strewn with empty champagne bottles after Blair’s 1997 victory.

            On the BBC’s internet page the diagram shown advising people on how to vote, had the pencil hovering over Labour’s red rose. I could go on and on.

            I am surprised that the BBC presenters were not wearing black arm bands last Friday, so obvious was their shock, horror and disappointment at Ed’s loss.

            I am actually surprised that Cameron achieved the victory he did in the face of such malign coverage.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Poised over a rose? That’s a bit weak. please go on and on. Start with your strongest example first. I don’t think you can compare that to the front pages every single day pushing the Cameron line.

            If the BBC is relieved in the face of a Lab victory, it’s generally because the Tories factions go after them at any opportunity. Chicken-egg really.

            I’m not surprised at the narrow Tory victory. nothing convinces people like fear.

          • starfish

            There are none so blind as will not see

            Look at Guido’s blog

            Every day he took a screen shot of the BBC election website page where Labour Good and Tory Bad was the dominant editorial theme

            Every Labour announcement highlighted, every bit of bad news buried

          • Ed O’Meara

            I’ll have a look at the former Young Conservative Libertarian’s blog. I bet it’ll be impartial as hell.

            People see what they want!

            ‘Staines (Guido) acted as editor of British Briefing, a long-standing publication by the group that was a “monthly intelligence analysis of the activities of the extreme left” that sought to “smear Labour MPs and left-leaning lawyers and writers”‘

          • Spuggy

            Would you please give an indication of who you see as impartial enough to pass judgement on the impartiality of the BBC?
            Mark Thompson? Greg Dyke? Peter Sissons?

          • Alexsandr

            then there is this

            http://biasedbbc.org/

          • Paddy

            Yes, but what about when Blair was elected.

            He had all the British media on his side.

            The British media fall in line with the British public. They want to sell newspapers.

          • Ed O’Meara

            That can’t be right, given that during the entire campaign everyone saw it as a hung parliament and yet pretty much all of the papers were talking up the Cons and heaping ridicule on Miliband and Labour.

          • Paddy

            I didn’t see it as a hung parliament.

            The papers were talking up the Conservatives because they are on the side of like-minded people.

          • Ed O’Meara

            What you saw it as is irrelevant. What the polls said was near parity.

          • Paddy

            Yes, but we still won.

            You’re sore losers.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Yeah. Na na na na na.

          • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

            Oh yes, the Mail loves Blair.

          • bikerboy

            His point is the press print what they think their readers will buy. 1996 – 2009 that was Lab.

            The press follow the zeitgeist, they don’t set it. That Mili was useless was obvious to everyone apart from him, apparently.

          • Paddy

            “I am actually surprised that Cameron achieved the victory he did in the face of such malign coverage”.

            Absolutely, the BBC and Guardian were relentless, and the downright lies of Labour – 48hrs to save child benefit 7 days to save NHS. That’s without the unions screaming about A@E waiting times and tents being put up in car parks.

            I just hope Cameron doesn’t take his foot off the brake. He needs to finish them off good and proper……….don’t feel sorry for them, and get rid of Bercow.

          • Ed O’Meara

            “the downright lies of Labour”

            Pot, kettle anybody? ALL the Tories did was lie. That windbag Cameron walking around with his little note prop banging on about “no money” and a “Labour recession”, ignoring every damn question put to him during Question Time. The man is a bungler, but no leader. Ed M too in all honesty!

          • Paddy

            The little letter was the truth.

            The Tories are no good at lying……..I wish they were. Labour are the party of lies and liars. Watch Chris Leslie, and Ed Balls……and they lie with a permanent grin on their faces.

          • Ed O’Meara

            “There is no money.”

            How is that the truth?

            The Tories lie all the time. Especially about his “three generations on the dole” which was flatly rejected by orgs like the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. The Tories struggled to find even 2 generation dole family.

            And how, please, was it a ‘Labour recession’?

            And how, please, ‘was Britain in the same state as Greece’?

          • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

            The Tories have used the credit crunch as an excuse for their dogmatic agenda .They have the press on side constantly repeating that Gordon Brown caused the global banking crisis. Now that is a lie.

          • bikerboy

            It isn’t said Gordon caused the banking crisis. He did make the recession in the UK much worse.

            Blair should have ditched him after 3 years max and given the job to Mili, D.

            Stop insulting everyone by telling them they couldn’t make up their own minds.

          • MC73

            “that Gordon Brown caused the global banking crisis”

            No-one on the right has ever claimed that. A lot of lying losing sh1ts on the left have said they claimed that, not quite the same thing.

          • Alexsandr

            no. gordon failed to see the recession coming. He overspent and ran a defecit in the boom years. so he had no resources when the sh1t hit the fan. That was their incompetence.

          • Paddy

            Oh dear, you have got problems!

            I have been on this web-site for a few hours now. I don’t know who to reply to first.

            There are only so many hours in the day.

            Would someone else please reply to Ed O’Meara because I am too tired.

          • Ed O’Meara

            The truth is knackering, mate. Easier to believe the narrative.

          • Shazza

            Not a prop. It was a statement of fact.

            Just another epic fail in Labour’s Reign of Terror 1997-2010.

          • Ed O’Meara

            No money? How?

          • Carved In Stone

            There’s no money in the sense that the governments spends more than it receives. The UK has the third highest deficit in the G20 as a percentage of GDP.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Yeah, international credit doesn’t work the same way as household finances. That’s what people fail to understand and why I’m a bit worried that that was a campaign issue, as very few people seem to actually understand what it means. Even if the deficit was in surplus (as it was under Blair in 2000) it would barely make a dent in the debt which is now STUPENDOUSLY high under the Tories.

            If the Conservatives wanted to go into surplus and start to sort out finances, they could start by getting back the £120 billion we lose from tax evasion every year. But they won’t. They’ll take it out on people who are pretty much powerless to do anything about it. If I didn’t know that the cuts were ideological, I would support the Conservatives. I would just like the government to sort out the country. I don’t care which side does it. It could be inter-parliamentary for all I care.

          • Carved In Stone

            What’s your source for £120 billion in tax evasion each year?

            The debt is higher because the deficit jumped to a record high of £156 billion in 2009. That deficit has to go somewhere.

          • Major Plonquer

            Or maybe they could ask if we could have Gordon Brown’s gold back?

          • Ed O’Meara

            That old chestnut…

          • bikerboy

            Anything wrong with it? The price became known as the Brown Bottom and epitomised his lack of competency.

          • Spuggy

            “That’s what people fail to understand and why I’m a bit worried that that was a campaign issue, as very few people seem to actually understand what it means”

            Funny how people are gullible fools when they elect a Tory majority, but compassionate, thoughtful paragons in a Labour victory.

          • Carved In Stone

            “ignoring every damn question put to him about people having died on welfare during Question Time”

            Meanwhile, Labour MPs were tut-tutting when asked about over 1,000 patients who died at Mid Staffs on an ITV debate before election day.

          • Ed O’Meara

            I’m am ABSOLUTELY not denying that both parties are guilty of it. It’s just a bit more galling when it comes directly from the mouth of the Prime Minister.

          • Carved In Stone

            Holding up a note written by a member of the Labour government is evidence for Cameron lying?

          • Ed O’Meara

            Misleading, yes. Cameron says “We have a note from Labour saying sorry there is no money” as if this wasn’t a joke from one bench to the other. It’s like saying “Look at the email that this guy sent me.” Pretty poor form doing that kind of thing in public.

            Cameron presented it as if Labour “bankrupted” (his words) the UK, which is palpable nonsense. UK PLC needed to sort out its finances in the face of a stonking crash and the bail out of banks but the idea that it was bankrupt is garbage. Anybody should know that, but they bough the snakeoil line.

          • Carved In Stone

            “Pretty poor form doing that kind of thing in public.”

            I thought it was David Laws who released the note, who is a Liberal Democrat.

            Everyone has known about the note for five years, so it wasn’t as if Cameron was making some great revelation.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Except he reproduced it over and over again as if it was the lynch-pin of his campaign!

            It’s Labour’s fault for not doing better, because the competition was laughable!

          • Major Plonquer

            Yet they still lost. Badly too. Speaks volumes.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Not really. Ed M was the wrong choice, UKIP creamed off a lot of working class votes, the SNP are rampant in Scotland and the Tories only have the slimmest of majorities. Add to that the fact that all polling orgs thought it would be a hung parliament, and the only loud volume is surprise.

          • bikerboy

            In 2010 the comments were (gist) we lose this one, (I mean who would want the chalice of winning it?) the economy carries on tanking and we come back in 2015.

            Oh well.

          • Spuggy

            So in summary:
            Labour are responsible for selecting the wrong leader, Labour failed to appeal to their core vote, Labour failed to retain 40 of its 41 seats in Scotland and Labour relied on woefully inaccurate polling data but you are still only surprised?

          • Alexsandr

            dysfunctional leader who couldnt take bad news, I hear. bit like his mentor, gordon brown of nokia chucking fame.

          • Alexsandr

            nothing to do with running a defecit in the boom before the 2008 crash then? You dont run defecits in boom years. Page 1 economics.

          • Major Plonquer

            …as opposed to coming from the mouth of a failed Prime Minister wannabe?

          • Ed O’Meara

            Yes.

          • sungeipatani

            How many people did die on welfare during Question Time?

          • Jen The Blue

            As you know, the note was written by a Labour minister. Obviously people die on welfare…….to start with a far higher proportion of people on welfare smoke and drink too much. Mid Staffs death camp on the other hand was a genuine example of how the NHS performs under Labour.
            Well, at least there are more people in work now under the Tories. Labour, the workers’ friend, have always increased unemployment.

          • Alexsandr

            dont forget the clusterfcuk that is the NHS in wales. under labour.

          • Major Plonquer

            I agree 100%. Then again, he beat your guy. Badly. Questions of judgment abound. Then there’s Rotherham, ahem.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Ed M was not good enough to win.

          • Spuggy

            “his little note prop banging on about “no money””

            Cameron can not be repudiated for this – there isn’t a politician in the world who would not have capitalised on it. Blame lies firmly with the idiot Liam Byrne for his staggering lack of judgement.

          • Jen The Blue

            The BBC threw everything behind Labour….its election homepage was staggering in its blatant bias.

          • Fionn Travers-Smith

            Bwahahah! A media conspiracy in favour of LABOUR?! You obviously haven’t been paying attention: https://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/oliver-huitson/press-campaign-so-far-coup-gathers-pace

          • Rupert

            Didn’t you watch the post election coverage when all the BBC guys were in shock and getting more and more angry as that old polling guy told them that the exit polls were the most accurate polls out there?

          • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

            38% cited the Mailonline and 20% Sky news as their main source of “views”.

          • Carved In Stone

            Do you have a source for that?

            Average election night viewing figures for the first hour:

            Sky News: 356,000 (3.5%)

            ITV: 1.45 million

            Channel 4: 1.9 million

            BBC One: 6.35 million (63%)

            http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-32654708

          • bikerboy

            Sky News. Lol.

          • Kennybhoy

            Ceterum autem censeo BBC esse delendam!

          • fair play

            Dear God. It’s not your narrow ignorance which is depressing, it’s its commonness. Think about this: if 63% of the population get their news from the BBC and if, as Peston has recently reminded us, the BBC is obsessed with the print media when it decides on its news agenda, how is it that so many people, despite this ‘brainwashing’ from the BBC. still come up with the right-wing commonsense banalities you’re expressing here? Could it possibly be that what all these people (and you) are being pumped with is not actually left-wing propaganda at all?
            Think about it.

          • Alexsandr

            or maybe we dont watch the BBC news

          • The Masked Marvel

            Actually, it was BBC 5 Live presenter Jane Garvey, who fondly recalled the scene at the BBC after Blair’s election. Andrew Marr has said that the BBC is so full of certain kinds of people that it “creates an innate liberal bias”. He was referring to young people, ethnic minorities, and homosexuals, although he could just as easily have included die-hard Lefties like himself and Jane Garvey.

          • Spuggy

            Odd that you and others to the left repeat this meme – but presumably you also acknowledge that Leftwing rags seek to promote Labour propaganda? Do you decry the intention or merely the outnumbering?

          • Jen The Blue

            At least you have the BBC on your side…….. and we all have to pay for their bias whether we like it or not.

          • Alexsandr

            hopefully not for long.

          • MrVeryAngry

            Explain?

          • http://www.robinbrown.co.uk/ Robin Brown

            Explain? What’s the point? If you’re of the belief that Ed Miliband is a Marxist you’re either deluded as to what Miliband is all about or you simply don’t understand what Marxism is.

          • Ross

            It’s a false consensus created by a massive amount of propaganda from corporate media.

          • bikerboy

            If you say so, but I made up my own mind. Ed did all his own talking.

          • Ed O’Meara

            The only one who has won a true majority is Rupert Murdoch.

          • bikerboy

            Oh for goodness sake…

          • Spuggy

            Godwin’s Law now replaced with Murdoch’s Law…
            Tch tch Ed.

          • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

            Daily Mail fairy story.

          • Patrick Roy

            The man is a card-carrying communist.

        • Ed O’Meara

          Not if the Thatcherite front benches have their way. Snooper’s Charter all round! Human Rights? Pffft. Don’t need ’em.

          • MrVeryAngry

            I am not at all sure that the Front Bench is Thatcherite. Tory certainly. Wasn’t Thatcher a fan of Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom?

          • Ed O’Meara

            Then perhaps Thatcherlite. Either way, we can all go and see the taxpayer-funded museum which Blusterin’ Dave will open.

          • MrVeryAngry

            What are you talking about?

          • Ed O’Meara

            Cameron’s Margaret Thatcher Museum…£20 million well spent I’m assured.

          • MrVeryAngry

            The figure I saw was £15m – which is a lot less than the £4Bn that we are forced to pay every year for the egregious BBC…

          • Ed O’Meara

            Yeah, but at least the BBC has some entertainment value. Vaguely!

            The Thatch Museum will be hilariously bad. Underpaid workers constantly on strike, Argentinians and miners spraying graffiti all over it and you won’t find any milk to put in your tea in the canteen.

          • MrVeryAngry

            Ah, missing the point about this ‘freedom’ and ‘markets’ thing I see. If you don’t like the Thatcher museum don’t go to it. If no-one goes to it, it will close. However if I never ever watch the BBC (I don’t) I am still forced to carry on paying for it.

          • Ed O’Meara

            I know. I just wanted to bag the museum! 🙂

            The interesting thing about ‘markets’ is that they’re all veeery free and happy until they mess themselves up and the taxpayer has to bail them out.

            Canary Wharf – the temple to the free market – heavily subsidised by the taxpayer.

          • MrVeryAngry

            Nope. Canary Wharf – I take you mean the banks? – are not in any way ‘free market’. They are cronyism and rent seeking on an apocalyptic scale, and they got that way may I remind you under the rule of the biggest crony of them all – A. Blair.
            Markets do not mess up, as a rule. Mostly they are messed up by the witless interventions of socialists and cronyists and bureaucrats. BTW, Osborne is just as stupid with all his land price subsidies like Help to Buy (more like help to sell).

          • Ed O’Meara

            But there will always be banks, so what use is the concept of a ‘free market’?

            Yes, Osborne also has that ridiculous and unworkable Right To Buy scheme – designed solely to remove the best HA and social housing. In order to taken advantage of the scheme, you’d have to be making around 50K. In which case you wouldn’t be in social housing.

          • MrVeryAngry

            Re Banks. You really do not have a clue about this ‘free market, liberty. rule of law, property rights, sound money thing do you?
            RTB Au contraire. I know of people living in ‘social housing’ whose gross equivalent income exceeds £50K – and has done so since the mid noughties.
            Look son, lefty dogma won’t cut it any longer. It’s not about right v left. It’s about totalitarian v libertarian (aka classical liberal). The left are even more nasty than the Tories, and they’re pretty bl***y awful..

          • Ed O’Meara

            “I know of people living in ‘social housing’ whose gross equivalent income exceeds £50K”

            Then you know of about one person. Congrats! You’re falling into the Daily Mail trap of taking one extreme example and then basing whole swathes of policy on it. Just watch how low the take up is, but how much housing is skimmed off the top.

            That “totalitarian v libertarian” is rightwing American framing creeping its way over here. I’m talking about the practicalities of the economy as it stands. What are you talking about?

            Funny how one party had ‘Freedom of Information’ and the other has the Snooper’s Charter and some rumblings about having been ‘too tolerant’ about ‘extremism.’

            Which one’s which again, son?

          • MrVeryAngry

            Para 2. oops. Wrong again. Run along and do some numbers.
            Para 2. Nope. Again you demonstrate your ignorance of classical liberal (aka libertarian).
            Para 3. Just when have I said that I hold any candle for either of those? You really haven’t been listening have you. As I said dogmatic and ignorance from the left – as usual.
            I have to go and create some wealth now so this discussion is at an end. I will not read any more guff from you and I will delete the email alerts without reading the content.
            Bye bye sonny Jim.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Ha! I knew it. All bluster.

          • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

            How do you square the

          • MrVeryAngry

            I don’t. I never have. I am not a Tory. I have never said that anywhere. In fact I have exactly the opposite. But that doesn’t make leftyism right (pun intended).

          • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

            So you think Banks are corrupt due to regulation.

          • MrVeryAngry

            I don’t think it. I know it. Have you ever spent any time with the utter self serving ignorant and arrogant numpties at the Financial Catastrophe Authority? I have. have you seen the revolving door between the Financial Catastrophe Authority and the Banks? I have. The whole nexus is one of self serving corruption. And FWIW the FCA has zero accountability. Not to democracy. Not to the Law. Not financially.

          • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

            Lots of Mr Whippy ice cream and a massive Spitting Image puppet repeating “there is no such thing as society”. NUM members free entry.

          • Johnny Foreigner

            Internet Nutter conflates Young Conservative blog, with BBC website. PsychoMaximus.

          • Paddy

            “Not if the Thatcherite front benches have their way”.

            I do hope so!

        • Ross

          Hmm, the snoopers charter would suggest otherwise.

          • Johnny Foreigner

            Apart from the now defunct Liberals, who of note is pushing against this dire policy.

      • Commenthead

        You’re probably right. But in practice a Labour victory would have sent all the wrong signals and put off investors in the UK massively. Also, I think Ed is a Marxist at his core, and this would have shown in any number of ways during his premiership; I can well imagine some truly bizarre policies emerging.

        • Ed O’Meara

          To an extent and only initially. If global economic conditions continued as they are, it wouldn’t make a massive amount of difference who was at the levers. I don’t think Ed M was the right man for the job (and I don’t think Dave is either) but remember that Labour is a broad church (like the Cons) and any ‘radical’ leftism would have quickly been diluted by party, parliament and public.

          • bikerboy

            The legacy of Brown tells us otherwise.

        • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

          Why a Marxist? Because his dad was one once? My dad drove stock cars. I am not a stock car driver. Ed didn’t even embrace the single most popular measure according to a variety of surveys, re-nationalise the railways.

          • bikerboy

            David isn’t a Marxist.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Marxists don’t bail out banks! 🙂

          • Major Plonquer

            Correct. It’s the other way around.

          • Alexsandr

            here we go again
            renationalise what
            network rail? – already in public ownership and actually most of the railways
            The TOC’s? Well they are just agents for the DfT. And the Dft takes a hefty premium from many ToC’s. Please tell me what benefit having the useless DfT running trains would be. remembering the west coast franchise debacle, and the new inter city train for great western and east coast that is 2x more expensive than the pedolinos in whole life cost

            The DFT that thought until recently that electrification was unnecessary unlike nearly every country in Europe. And throught discontinuous electrification was a good idea.
            The ROSCOs? They own £9bn, and fund investment in upgrading trains. have the government got the money to buy them out? Have they the expertise in the fleet management the ROSCOS have?
            do some homework.

    • Shazza

      The politics of aspiration prevailed over the politics of class warfare, envy, spite and a vision of a future wherein success would be rewarded by punitive taxes.

      Had Ed M won the election, I would have advised my daughter and her husband, both professionals, to leave the country and take their talents and considerable taxpaying abilities to another country.

      This country would have seen a mass brain drain that would have done it immeasurable damage.

      Hopefully it will be a long, long time before Labour get’s it’s ruinous hands on the levers of power again.

      • Ed O’Meara

        A slight win by a shaky Tory government is not a victory for aspiration. The world economy is jittering and spluttering. If there is another crash, we can call it a “TORY RECESSION” (which won’t be fair but will be fair payback) and Labour will come into power on a centrist mandate.

        • starfish

          “The world economy is jittering and spluttering”

          Really?

          NB The ‘world economy’ is not the EU

          • Ed O’Meara

            The Bank of England have already had to cut growth forecasts. Mark Carney has said this will not be like former recoveries. Far weaker. Far more cautious.

          • bikerboy

            And Lab would have fixed that, right? Saving us all again I guess.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Labour would have benefited from a global recovery as the Tories have done.

          • bikerboy

            Like they did in 1997. So it goes.

          • Ed O’Meara

            But that’s fine! I just wish our political stories could be a bit more honest.

          • Jen The Blue

            Since you lefties think borrowing is the answer to everything, why not borrow £ 65 000 000 000 000 ? £ 1 million for every man woman and child, and hand it out to us? Then we will all be millionaires and poverty will be over? The bonus is, nobody will have to work and think of the welfare savings.
            That is about the level of leftist economics.

          • fair play

            Man puts a reasoned case. Gets ‘you lefties’ in response. That’s the level of political debate in this benighted realm.
            Grow up.

          • johnbarneslondon

            Yup. To be fair there’s plenty of that from the left as well. But hey-ho! Let’s hope the next global banking crisis hits when the Tories are in power and we can blame it on them and romp home with another marginally left-of-centre agenda, labelled ‘Marxist’ by those promising to emigrate as they froth from the mouth.

          • fair play

            Quite. Thought I was on my own here. Only wandered in cos it was raining out. Depressing level of debate. Are they all kids?

          • johnbarneslondon

            That’s The Spectator for you, I expect. For lunacy balance, see the comments on The New Statesman website.

          • Jen The Blue

            Most unlikely, the drift in politics throughout life tends to be from left to right. Presumably as people wise up.

          • fair play

            Or the passion ebbs. Or, as I once heard a Tory woman claim ‘We really thought David Cameron was eye candy’. Or Michael Gove begins to look more attractive. Or the brain cells die.

          • Jen The Blue

            “You lefties” hardly seems the most hate filled, vitriolic way of identifying those of a left wing persuasion. I think you lefties have lost all sense of proportion and humour since the election.

          • Ed O’Meara

            Cool straw man argument there, ‘righty’.

          • Jen The Blue

            Most of my lefty friends scathingly refer to me as “Tory Boy”. But I’ll take “righty”.

          • fair play

            You and your ‘scathingly’. It validates you.

          • leonard bolton

            Jen — don’t give a lefty ideas like that. They might actually think that it would work. I’ve heard one propose it.
            I explained to him that we’d all have a lot of money but a loaf of bread would cost 500 quid

          • David

            Brilliant – why hasn’t anyone else thought of that?

          • Bebop

            But a recovery none the less. Reminds me of Obama asking what Israel has achieved all these years. The answer: Israel is still there.

          • leonard bolton

            Israel is still there because it’s propped up by the American taxpayer. You don’t think they pay for those F15’s selling oranges do you?

          • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

            The previous growth forecast was based on Labour being in power. Tories follow the don’t spend agenda which cripples economies.

          • MC73

            yeah the Tories have only been borrowing £90bn a year since 2010. Tight bstards! Won’t they think of the starving kiddies?

          • Dogsnob

            What a silly thing for the forecasters to have done then, eh?

          • Ed  

            Ah, yes. We all remember the Roaring 70s, don’t we?

          • Alexsandr

            no. spend agenda kills economies. Because they get saddled with unsustainable debt. A government should be defecit/surplus neutral over the economic cycle.

          • Jen The Blue

            At least! Preferably running a slight surplus foe emergencies with anything extra going to reduce tax.
            When you think about it, the government taxes smoking because it sees it as a morally bad thing, alcohol similarly, and (wholly without evidence) the emission of CO2…….why do we tax income? Work? Providing for ones family?

          • fair play

            Funny that no one answered this one, eh J?

          • woolfiesmiff

            This would be the Mark Carney that said interest rates would rise once unemployment fell below 7% would it?

          • Alexsandr

            they cant allow interest rates to rise cos mortgage rate rises would cripple those who have over borrowed. Loads of people having their homes repossessed is a worse headline than pensioners being robbed of their income.

          • David

            Yes, and what is the reason for this? The massive amount of taxpayers money being spent on debt repayments bequeathed to us by Labour, that could otherwise have gone on tax cuts, that’s what.

          • David

            Indeed. This is a common mistake made by Labour supporters. Apparently it was a ‘global recession’ in 2008, when China grew by 12% and India by 8% that year, Canada, Australia and NZ clocked 3% and Brazil 5%. So yeah, it was a world recession… not!

        • Carved In Stone

          The IMF warned Labour in 2005 that government spending was too high, several years before the financial crisis.

          • Ed O’Meara

            …which still had nothing to do with the crash. The IMF also warned Osbourne not to cut so deeply!

          • Carved In Stone

            When the crash came, our position was worse than other countries because of Labour’s overspending.

            Did Osbourne cut so deep?

          • Alexsandr

            osbourne didnt cut enough to balance the books by 2015. so FAIL

          • Jen The Blue

            He barely cut at all.
            Austerity is media fantasy.

          • Jen The Blue

            People of left and right should argue their own cases rather than quote the IMF or others. They are hardly infallible.

        • Dogsnob

          I like that other one with the beans and the giant.

          • Ed O’Meara

            The number of beans have been cut, except among those who already have lots of beans. They get extra. The giant is national debt.
            http://www.nationaldebtclock.co.uk/

          • Dogsnob

            You are seriously suggesting that the clock would not be running so much faster had Labour been in power?
            Come on, if there’s one thing Labour supporters have to admit, it’s that borrowing is accepted as the thing to do, the more, the better?

          • Jen The Blue

            Indeed ….it is a pi*s take to suggest a Labour government would have borrowed less.

        • Jen The Blue

          And the band played “believe it if you like”. Even IF Labour were not entirely responsible for the financial crash, they were certainly entirely responsible for the huge deficit the country had in the supposed “good economic times” before the crash.
          The last Labour government did what every one in history has….wrecked the economy……it took longer than usual, but it was more spectacular than usual too.

          • Ed O’Meara

            There’s no IFs about it, but the Tory position is that they did because it’s a simple narrative which plays well with voters. Why worry about complicated reality, eh?

          • Jen The Blue

            If only us on the right could understand economics like the left!
            [Heavy sarcasm]

          • johnbarneslondon

            Yes – that’s why Osborne backed their spending in 2007. Labour had to spend to rebuild the crumbling schools and hospitals left to rot by the Tories.

          • Jen The Blue

            Osborne is no Tory.

          • johnbarneslondon

            …and on that bombshell…

        • Major Plonquer

          Greetings from Asia? Out of curiosity, which world do you live in? Over here our economic growth has slowed all the way down to 7%. This must be a new definition of “jittering and spluttering”.

          • Ed O’Meara

            But China’s growth kept going even in the crash, so I don’t think you can lump Western and Eastern economies together…but nice try anyway.

          • leonard bolton

            China has better capitalism than we do — there you can actually keep the money earned. Unlike here where we have to pay for all the stupid Labour give-aways

          • Jen The Blue

            Which drives growth.

      • Commenthead

        I totally agree. Miliband would have caused really huge flight from the UK, it would have been a genuine phenomenon. I myself would have tried to leave I think. I’m just not interested in his dated notion of a Workers’ Paradise.

        • alabenn

          You had an example across the channel, quite a few hundred thousand fled to London.

      • http://www.iandsmith.com ID Smith

        I disagree. Look at our good record in office: 1 million children taken out of poverty. Tory aspirations are unobtainable Downtonesque fantasies and false promises of privilege. The Labour party is about aspirations for everybody. We want the child to achieve regardless of background, achievement the Tories crush with their narrow school curriculums and high fees. You can aspire to Torydom, but you’ll die wishing because you can only inherit with the right genes, and there are no vacancies in the gene pool. The door is shut. Believe me.

        • sungeipatani

          I don’t believe you because you are talking rubbish.

          • http://www.iandsmith.com ID Smith

            How many children will the Tories trap in poverty?

          • bikerboy

            All this time I thought trapping people in poverty while promising to lift them out of it was Lab’s electoral strategy.

          • http://www.iandsmith.com ID Smith

            You are funny. If we were this organised we wouldn’t be facing ten years in opposition.

          • MC73

            Fink of the kiddies! Poor little bleeders…

            Oh, BTW, when you said ‘1 million children’ above you made a bit of a typo, as I’m sure you meant to write ‘think of the 1 million people New Labour attached to the state tit via cushy public sector non-jobs in the hope they’d gerrymander the lot of them’.

          • Dogsnob

            Ooh now then, let’s see. How about we just think of a really big number and then do lots of squealing?

          • Patrick Roy

            I’m more interested in how many legs might remain shut at the thought of decreasing benefits.

        • ButcombeMan

          It was certainly not shut when there were Grammar Schools. One reason UKIP wants to have more.

          • fair play

            1954, eh? Equal opportunity heaven.

          • ButcombeMan

            Worked for me and lots more poor kids.

          • Dogsnob

            Not heaven, not even near. Just functioning moreso than in our more vocal, less active time.

        • Shazza

          Labour’s great achievements:-

          Destroy private pensions by Brown’s tax raid.
          Sell gold at rock bottom prices.
          Squander £12BILLION+ on failed IT NHS project.
          Disastrous PFI deals which we are saddled with.
          Destroy social cohesion by deliberately importing an ideology whose toxic aim is to implement it’s version of society for all.
          Dumb down education and inflate grades.
          Deny a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty ceded vast amount of power to the WE.
          Iraq.
          Rotherham.
          Infamous Human Rights Act.

          I can go on and on……..

          • Shazza

            Sorry – EU Not WE!

          • bikerboy

            The Edit button is your friend

          • Shazza

            I know. Having a problem with my laptop…..

          • Dogsnob

            It’s every thinking person’s friend. It’s called drafting.

          • Paddy

            Mid-staffs (1200 deaths)

          • fair play

            I’m sure you do.

          • johnbarneslondon

            Sure Start, minimum wage, hospitals and schools rebuilt after Tory neglect, freedom of information act, civil partnerships, free museum entry, universal free nursery schooling, child trust fund, education maintenance allowance…

          • Shazza

            Financially ruinous PFI deals regarding hospitals and schools.

            For the rest excluding minimum wage, this was a case of Labour spending money they did not have.

            Have you heard of Mr Micawber?

        • Dogsnob

          If the Labour Party is about aspirations for everybody, how come everybody ends up financially weakened by their every period in office, such that the mess has to be sorted out by someone else?

          I think that is just one of the lines of thought which has caused so many people to ditch Labour.

          I did not vote Tory either.

          • fair play

            ‘Everybody’? Or just the ones that you and the 85% Tory media focus your thoughts on.
            Think for yourself.

          • Dogsnob

            Well I don’t know where the 85% figure comes from, do you?
            I take it you accept that the BBC forms a substantial part of ‘the media’?
            So go on then, tell us who is made stronger, more secure, happier even, when Labour get their turn at running the country?
            Go back as far as you want.
            Think for yourself, for a change.

          • johnbarneslondon

            Let’s start with raising the school leaving age and the NHS, and move swiftly on to the last Labour administration and…Sure Start, minimum wage, hospitals and schools rebuilt after Tory neglect, freedom of information act, civil partnerships, free museum entry, universal free nursery schooling, child trust fund, education maintenance allowance…

          • Dogsnob

            Can’t see any strength, security or happiness in any of this.

            “The NHS”? The NHS what? The IHNS morelike, and we all know what the extra initial stands for.
            Sure Start, wow what a lifesaver that is.
            Minimum wage, you have to be kidding? Labour’s contribution to low-paid workers was what? It was to import millions of foreign hands so as to make wages lower.
            Hospitals and schools: both dysfunctional, Tory or Labour.
            Civil partnerships: so lovely.
            And on we go: life is just one big gravy train in which all is free and no debts have to be paid back.

          • johnbarneslondon

            What on earth are you on about? ‘No debts have to be paid back’? Osborne has just boasted about paying back the South Sea Bubble debt – that took 200 years. We’ve just paid back the Yanks for the WW2 loan – that took 70 yrs. And did the country fall apart? Paying off the deficit in five years is a smokescreen. It doesn’t need to be done, except if you use it as an excuse for rolling back the state and welfare cuts (with which I’m sure you wholeheartedly agree). Oh, and more privatisation…and we know how successful that’s been; utility cartels ripping us off. Honestly, I thought the New Statesman comments were being overwhelmed by swivel-eyed zealots. You lot on here take the biscuit. What next? the workhouses?

          • Dogsnob

            You put in a nutshell: ‘No debts have to be paid back’.
            There’s the mistake I’ve been making. Now that I’ve had it explained to me I can perfectly see why Labour have such a penchant for spending money they haven’t got.

            I think next year the UK should borrow an extra 20 billion and that can be distributed across the globe and it will all be very lovely. For everyone.

          • johnbarneslondon

            You’re high on a cocktail of hubris and schadenfreude, my friend, and have stopped making any sense.

          • Dogsnob

            No hubris at all. Perhaps a touch of the other stuff.
            I think the sense I am making is quite clear to anyone beyond the London pail, where blinkers are de rigeuer.

            Just off out to get high on a cocktail of malt and barley.

          • johnbarneslondon

            Yes, of course.

          • johnbarneslondon

            I think you misunderstood me: ‘No debts have to be paid back’ was in quotation marks; I was quoting your attempt at sarcasm not stating a fact. Punctuation is important.

          • Alexsandr

            you dont pay back defecits. you pay back debt
            tory plan was zero defecit. not paying back debt.
            think you need to get defecit and debt clear in your head.

          • johnbarneslondon

            If we’re talking pedantry I think you need to learn how to spell deficit, mate.

          • Alexsandr

            bit of a difference between a typo and a basic misunderstanding of economic terms, mate.

          • johnbarneslondon

            Interesting that you made the same typo twice. Anyway, debt is merely accumulated deficits – neither of which need to be paid off immediately any more than you have to pay off a mortgage in the first five years. Or you could impose ‘austerity’ on your family and make ’em starve while you pay off your debt/deficit. Excuse me while I go and pay off my credit card deficit…

          • Major Plonquer

            The BBC is a Tory organ? How fascinating.

        • Patrick Roy

          You are joking, right?

        • Old Gerry

          If you really want children to be able to achieve regardless of background, you should support Grammar schools. One did OK for me (grandfathers a docker and a dock crane driver).

          • http://www.iandsmith.com ID Smith

            And a non-selective state comprehensive school did okay for me and many others like me.

          • bikerboy

            So one size fits all. That’s alright then.

          • http://www.iandsmith.com ID Smith

            No, my school catered for diversity and broadened opportunity.

          • Spuggy

            But not for me and many others like me. Evidence not anecdote.

        • Major Plonquer

          Borrowing money from foreigners to hand out to “take children out of poverty” is a perfect example of socialists tackling the symptoms instead of the problem. You still have to pay the money back, you know. So when these children grow up they’ll be faced with the bill. How clever is that?

          • http://www.iandsmith.com ID Smith

            A bill free world? And you say we talk about utopia. Perfect cloud cuckoo Tory aspirational fantasy la-la-land! Hogwarts!

        • Dogsnob

          Many, many millionaires wouldn’t believe you.

        • Alexsandr

          ‘taken out of peoverty’ Well Labour use relative poverty. 60% of the median income. But if you increase the incomes of the poorest you move the median, and therefore put some back in poverty again.
          we should use absolute poverty. an income whereby one cannot operate.

      • Nick

        Funnily enough Shazza on polling day me and the missus spoke about moving to Cyprus if Labour had won.Now to be honest,it was just a passing remark after we had voted but if Labour had won the election and things deteriorated I wonder if we would now be making preparations to leave the country.

    • david blane

      I don’t see his defeat that way. He had a chance to stand up for Marxist tripe, he could have said “We need more immigration” and “The SNP have good values, we can work with them” but instead he buckled and let the right wing of the Tory party set the agenda. You saw with the LibDems, the electorate despises weakness.

      • GUBU

        Indeed.

        Mr Miliband could have presented a more authentically left wing prospectus, advocated more immigration and welcomed closer co-operation with the SNP.

        Labour would probably have then lost by an even greater margin.

        I assume that defeat on such a basis would be more intellectually satisfying to you – but it would still have been a defeat.

        • david blane

          They didn’t welcome *any* cooperation with the SNP, despite having lots of values in common, purely because they were bullied. Whether they would have lost on an honest socialist platform is besides the point. By not offering that choice to the electorate they’ve sacrificed the union, their party, and their souls. Ed has to spend the rest of his life living with cowardice and no brother to console him. Brutal political suicide.

          • GUBU

            Mr Miliband did not commit political suicide. He was trampled to death by the electorate, as they passed over him on their way to vote for the SNP in Scotland, and the Conservatives in England.

            Mr Miliband may be many things, but it is I think ludicrous to accuse him of political cowardice.

            To effectively abandon his own party’s candidates in Scotland to play footsy with the SNP before a single vote had been counted – that would have been political cowardice.

            And – as we now know – to have done so would have simply reinforced the growing feeling amongst many English voters that one outcome they did not want was a government influenced by parties who would never be amenable to them through their own ballot boxes. It was therefore, amongst other things, the prospect of the very choice you claim Mr Miliband denied to the electorate that helped lose him this election.

            You also conveniently ignore the fact that these voters were artfully helped towards that conclusion by the SNP themselves, who had and have as much (if not more) to gain from a Labour defeat as any of the other parties.

            Like others, you are guilty of changing the facts to fit the story you have already written. That – as Mr Hodges piece illustrates – is how you lose elections.

          • david blane

            We disagree on why voters trampled them. You’re a Tory so you think it was policies. I’m neutral and to me it looked like perceived weakness, like the LibDems. If you can get your opponent to say whatever you want them to say, voters will see them as irrelevant.

          • bikerboy

            I know Ed’s a robot but he was programmed by his spinners, not his opponents.

          • GUBU

            Sorry, but you are making assumptions again. I might not be a Tory – and you might not be neutral, for all either of us know.

            As for an opponent shaping your narrative, you would do well to remember that many ‘progressives’ happily talked up idea of the ‘rainbow coalition’ before the election – perhaps because they sensed it was the only way that Labour would make it into office, perhaps because they sensed it would guarantee a more left leaning government, perhaps (in the case of the SNP, I would suggest) because it allowed them to slice off a portion of the traditional Labour vote using a relatively low risk argument with voters.

            It was Mr Miliband’s erstwhile friends who put that prospect out there. The Conservatives realised that many voters in England didn’t like it – and profited from that realisation.

          • Alexsandr

            nothing to do with UKIP taking votes from labour then?

          • david blane

            Because of weakness, yeah.

    • crackenthorp

      complete crap

    • Patrick Roy

      You got that right BillRees.

  • Christopher Gage

    Best I’ve read in a while. Strong stuff.

  • Fraser Bailey

    Yes, a beautiful read. I might have it framed. But surely, any campaign run by the astonishingly stupid and inarticulate Lucy Powell was always going to be a disaster.

    • Yvon & Barry Stuart-Hargreaves

      At least when the next foul up occurs the toffs can’t blame the Liberals.

  • WhiteVanMan

    If true about. Balls, Yvette on getting any power should destroy Milibands fan base,of Thirnberry ,khan etc

    • DWWolds

      She might not – in fact probably will not – “get any power”.

  • Peter

    Good article. On 20 April my Labour PPC, the local council candidate and their agents
    walked past my house whilst I was gardening. We exchanged pleasantries
    and the councillor asked if they could count on my vote. I replied ‘er,
    no’, to which they thanked me and walked off. After a second or two I
    asked ‘are you not interested in why not?’ at which the cllr and
    the agent turned back – the PPC walked off. After
    five minutes discussion the PPC stood 50 yards away waving back at her
    colleagues demanding they catch up with her. I asked the PPC later why she
    didn’t want to engage and discuss my vote, to which she replied the
    day after ‘Sorry, but at this stage of the campaign I need to find
    people who might vote for me. You had a good talk with (my colleagues) though’.
    Just my 2p on what seemed something akin to hubris, auto-pilot or just
    general lack of real engagement.

    • Caractacus

      Hilarious.

    • http://twitter.com/ralasdair Alasdair

      Guarantee you Tories would’ve done the same. Like it or not, the ‘ground operation’ of all major UK parties is about identifying and turning out people who will vote for them.

      Which is probably sensible – the ‘air war’ of the press and TV will generally make people’s minds up far more effectively than you can on the ground anyway.

      • Kin62

        Yeah you’re right. Do you really expect somebody who’s trying to win to waste time listening to an armchair pundit’s (quite possibly excellent, but quite possibly tedious) ramblings.

  • fubar_saunders

    “It’s a story of chaos, dysfunction and hubris.”

    The story of Labour, full stop, then. Nothing new there. 🙂

  • geo

    now that the shy conservative voter has been disproved and the missing 2 million labour voters is gaining credence … does anyone know why the 2mil stayed at home? Where they all composing victory tweets? scathing hate posts on the mail website? emails of congratulations to the DG of the bbc and grauniad editorial team for their support? … or were they just too embarrassed by the edstone, r brand esq, the campaign to destroy british businesses and the fact that ed would have been a goldfish in a tank of piranha come the first world summit?

    • mdj

      ‘..does anyone know why the 2mil stayed at home?’

      Surely they voted for UKIP?

  • CharleyFarleyFive

    This is just glorious, and of course great vindication for Mr Hodges.

    Right, I’m scrolling up for another read, this is never going to get old.

  • http://www.thelaymansterms.com/ The layman’s voice

    Scary stuff… but are we really surprised Ed Miliband was out of touch?

    Seriously?

  • kathee

    I remember lying in my room when I was in high school and writing in a journal to my future husband. I’d write all sorts of notes and questions and things I’d wonder or ask this man when I eventually met him. I would wonder where he was and what he was doing and if he was thinking about me too. It has always been such a strong desire in my heart to find a wonderful man to marry, someone who would love me and cherish me and appreciate me for the person I am. I always thought I would get married cright out of college, just like my parents, so when that plan didn’t work out, I started to get discouraged. A school mate snatched my future husband away from my arms just because she had spiritual powers, all hope was lost to me before i came across the help doctor (prayerstosaverelationship@gmail.com
    ) who i confided in, i told him my long story and he helped me regain back my lover with his prayers which is now my husband today. if you have any problem email the help doctor (prayerstosaverelationship@gmail.com
    ).

  • John Carins

    Labour lost because it has nothing to say. Its ideology and policies are irrelevant to the 21st C. The whole idea that they represent the “working man” is utter tosh. They are trying to support something that no longer exists. The failure of them not believing the polling intelligence is a symptom of their blindness to the wider truth.

    • Alexsandr

      yes, the huge plants employing thousands of unionised workers have gone. And most workers have mortgages, and want (need) cars, foreign holidays and the best for their kids.The middle class values have invaded most workers now. and Labours raison d’etre has gone.

  • Andy

    Got an email from HQ asking to volunteer (despite no longer being a member) Clicked link to go to the volunteer page and it was dead.
    Speaks volumes, especially when telling Lucy Powell (via Twitter) that it wasn’t working only to get another volunteer email with the same problem.

    Don’t forget btw on election night McNicol sent an email out saying that:
    “this has been hands down the best campaign I’ve ever worked on”

    McNicol was following me on Twitter but stopped when I told him about the problems the party had.

    HEAD IN THE SAND IS NO SHOCK

    • Tim Bake

      Someone should tell the BBC though, they are carrying on as if Labour won.

      • MrVeryAngry

        Yeah. Last item on R4 Toady was ‘why did labour lose’. As if it was a surprise. Or that labour was the party that should always win. The most disgraceful bit of biased broadcasting I have heard, in oh, about 6 hours.

        • Tim Bake

          Yup, And Ms Cooper on WATO just now, sounding alarmingly like Ed M and spouting on about how many people agreed with Labour policies, and yet somehow didn’t vote for them. Most odd. Some tall ivory towers, they must all live in.

          • MrVeryAngry

            Thank the Lord that I missed that tripe.

          • Alexsandr

            maybe the labour party should fill in our ballot papers for us so we elect he right government. Oh sorry, they do that already with postal voting.

        • Alexsandr

          BBC should go subscription. Telly at least.

  • kathee

    I remember lying in my room when I was in high school and writing in a journal to my future husband. I’d write all sorts of notes and questions and things I’d wonder or ask this man when I eventually met him. I would wonder where he was and what he was doing and if he was thinking about me too. It has always been such a strong desire in my heart to find a wonderful man to marry, someodne who would love me and cherish me and appreciate me for the person I am. I always thought I would get married right out of college, just like my parents, so when that plan didn’t work out, I started to get discouraged. A school mate snatched my future husband away from my arms just because she had spiritual powers, all hope was lost to me before i came across the help doctor (prayerstosaverelationship@gmail.com
    ) who i confided in, i told him my long story and he helped me regain back my lover with his prayers which is now my husband today. if you have any problem email the help doctor (prayerstosaverelationship@gmail.com
    ).

    • Nick H

      Thanks Kathee, I understand the Labour grandees are emailing the help doctor as we speak!

      • FrankS2

        I feel sorry for the “lucky guy” – he’s wed a loonie!

  • Gerschwin

    I wish I could have seen the look on his face as the moment of truth dawned.

    • Peter Stroud

      He probably believes it was one great Tory fiddle.

      • HampshireVoter

        Have been over to CiF at the Guardian? Quite a few conspiracy theorists over there.

        • Icebow

          ‘Comment is Free’, and unLeft comment is freely removed. Freedom, after all, is slavery, and slavery is bad.

      • Paddy

        MI5!

  • rodger the dodger

    Not so much ‘Downfall’ as the poorest episode of ‘The Thick of It’.

    • http://www.thelaymansterms.com/ The layman’s voice

      What a great mash-up! Can someone put together a lip-sync of a Thick Of It Episode to Downfall visuals – that would be epic

  • souptonuts

    What was Axelrod doing? And has Paul O’Grady left the country yet? Like Rod Liddle I am happy to contribute to a generous excess baggage allowance.

    • mdj

      ‘What was Axelrod doing?’
      Putting the phone down and laughing uncontrollably, I imagine.
      Had the campaign lasted longer he’d have advised Ed to show his clear vision and unerring aim by shooting an albatross.
      Ed has clearly never read ‘Huckleberry Finn’.

      • Alexsandr

        hope he got paid up front. I imagine an invoice arriving now would be laughed at.

  • Teacher

    Miliband’s delusional hopes are just the pointy end of a pyramid of self deceit. As a retired teacher most of my friends and acquaintances are left leaning and, to a man, they are self deceiving in their world view. They believe things that simply aren’t true (of the ‘all Tories are evil racists who kick disabled people’ variety) and cannot confront their unknowing. I can see quite clearly from my friends’ speech and behaviour that Socialism is a faith which depends on belief not thought or rationality.

    • Nessa

      Very well put.

    • Fraser Bailey

      Yes, not even Socialists still believe that the earth is flat, or that the sun revolves around the earth, or that the sick can be cured with leeches or the draining of blood. Yet they still believe in Socialism. It is really quite extraordinary.

      • mdj

        It’s a religion; if you’ve got a semitic geezer with a F-off beard and a big fat book that contains all the answers, you’ve got a religion. Material evidence is of no concern.
        A well-established syndrome, after all.

        Except that they want you to pay their tithes.

    • MrVeryAngry

      Nicely put. You are right. It’s pure dogma. And irrational in itself.

    • Bonzo

      Sadly, all too true, Teacher. Many of my friends are left wing. Apart from their politics they are sane, intelligent people. On politics they have a simplistic view that the left is all that is good and moral while all views to right of them are bad and evil. I have no problem with the left thinking its views are intellectually superior (nor that the right should also think that) but the blanket application of such moral extremes to their opponents is one of the left’s great failings. Certainly one of the things that puts me off voting for them.

  • HannahSpark

    I read this and thought …really? What a silly spiteful piece of journalism with no actual substance. Then I scrolled up and saw it was written by Dan Hodges who’s evidently set to persist with his vendetta against Ed Miliband for years to come. It’s almost the only topic he’s written on for the past few years after backing David Miliband and losing. His screaming, visceral hatred of EM says far more about Hodges than about Miliband. Far more.

    • DWWolds

      Really?

    • David Price

      Hannah, walk round the house until you find a mirror. Look into it. YOU, the blinkered Labour voter are the problem. Your blind allegiance to an outdated party, the inability to accept criticism, the utter certainty that Labour were right and everyone else was wrong. Until you can accept that the majority of England (and that’s where you need to win) does not want your brand of 1970s hypocritical Socialism you have zero chance of majority Government.

    • Michael Tostevin

      may i suggest Hannah that you have a look at the vast majority of replies to this article ,then have a think about your reply ,Mr. Hodges was putting into words the thoughts of the majority of voters ,but i fear this will not change your mind , so be it …michael.

      • Michael Tostevin

        very well put Adam thank you , but as i said i fear that your reply ,mine , or the majority view will not change Hanna’s mind , and long may this be ….they will loose again next time because of this .

    • Adam Peak

      No, I will not have that Hannah. I’m here to defend Dan Hodges, and no this isn’t a put-up job. I’m a neutral, just a fan of great political writing, and I have to say one journalist stands head and tall above all others – that man is Dan Hodges. Why? Because he, almost alone, predicted the massive win for the Conservatives, against all the polls and “expert” opinion, Dan was pretty much the only journalist who stood firm, consistently writing about how this election would swing for the Conservatives. Dan was saying years ago what the likes of Mandelson and Umumma (or whatever he’s called) have only started saying a week ago – Ed was the wrong choice for leader, he never stood a chance, he made loads and loads of mistakes along the way.

      Dan Hodges did everything you’d expect from a blogger/columnist. Expressed an opinion based on facts, knowledge and instinct, always entertainingly worded and sometimes downright hilarious.

      Dan has been proven right and his doubters wrong. I’ll probably be accused of being a sockpuppet or something, but no I’m just a student of Journalism and an amateur writer myself. People like Dan are my inspiration!

    • Shazza

      Nonsense. Hodges consistently pointed out the error of Miliband’s 35% strategy, his other political failings as well as his personal shortcomings as the leader of the Party of Mass Destruction.

      The bottom line is that the politics of aspiration based on a positive economic recovery won over the tired old politics of class hatred, envy and a vision of rewarding success with punitive taxes.

  • oneofoursubsismissing

    Well done Dan. There have been times in the past five years when I’ve doubted you, but you were right. The current crop of leadership hopefuls look none too interesting. I had thought it might be Liz Kendall but she had a terrible time on Newsnight.

  • RavenRandom

    Nice article. A lucky miss for us all. Labour voters too I imagine. Hopefully Labour are learning the lesson on this and can move on from Marxist Academic Experiment 7 otherwise known as Ed Miliband.
    The other lesson for Labour, judging by all the post-election comment, is a) how could they elect someone so user unfriendly b) when it became obvious he was useless why didn’t they get rid of him?

  • http://sagevals.wordpress.com/ Sage Vals

    Balls really shouldn’t have been relying on central party polling for information about his own constituency. Neither in 2010 or last week. Its his fault, or that of his local party, not the fault of Labour HQ.

  • Violin Sonata.

    Who truly cares about the last moments of Miliband but as amusing article I suppose.
    Basically the only hope for Labour would have been someone who at least represented working class voters those who Labour were supposed to represent
    before becoming a party of third world immigrants and champagne socialists.
    Dan Jarvis was their only hope, an ex officer, widow and modest man who has some empathy with the electorate but he’s not standing and to be quite frank even he is
    more for the officer then the foot soldier. Like it or not Labour are history.

  • Peter Stroud

    We have had a lucky escape from a quasi Marxist administration. As many of us realised, Miliband is a confirmed Marxist in his beliefs, and although he would have been constrained by our constitution, and those on the right of Labour, from carrying out the most extreme of his ideas, some would have got through. He seems to be more of a megalomaniac than his old boss – Gordon Brown. Now all he has to do is to resign his seat.

    • MrVeryAngry

      No! Not possible to more of a megalomaniac than the Prime Mentalist. Just not.
      But, he is even more deluded.

  • gerronwithit

    Sublime! One of the nicest things to have happened to this country for a long time.

  • Charlatans

    Constituency offices of Lib/Lab/Con all hold a mass of information and insiders will know how easy it is to conduct internal polls down to ward level, should it be required.

    It is only the resources, management strategy and organising ability that prevents such accurate internal polling.

    Labour ‘red mist’ ideological emphasis, class war and ‘spin’ combined with slack party business management of ward polling efficiency prevented the polling reality coming out.

    In this social media age, even the subtle support of the gigantic BBC, which was leading almost daily on the ‘Labour’ story and demonising opposition like UKIP and the Tories, could only last so long before sites and blogs on line overrode with the facts and truth of the Labour ‘left’ shift coming to the fore.

    • Basilthedog

      “Subtle”??!!!

    • starfish

      It is interesting

      The only site I didn’t go to for election news was the BBC

      • Charlatans

        Starfish ….remember official statistics show 80% of the nation does access BBC news regularly.

        • Paddy

          But you have to know what the enemy are thinking and doing.

          • Icebow

            Lefties and muzz are birds of a feather, until the latter devours the former.

  • Landphil

    Ed Miliband, the man whom Britain hated.

    • JoeCro

      I think hate is too stronger word. He just did not look like PM material. Miliband and the SNP thing were a toxic combination for Labours chances.

      • Bonzo

        Agree. In much the same way I don’t hate Mr Bean for not being any good at being funny.

    • Alexsandr

      no. that was ed b0110cks.

  • Scradje

    ‘This is a tale of Labour’s downfall: the inside story of the party’s most catastrophic election campaign since the war. It’s a story of chaos, dysfunction and hubris.’
    Great, but beware; the indescribably awful Kinnock was on course for a win until his ‘we’re alright’ Sheffield rally. His smug face and piffling speech was preceded by sneering warm up men, John Smith and Roy Hattersley. The latter describing Kinnock as ‘looking more and more like the real tenant of number ten.’ Luckily the public recoiled in horror at this repugnant spectacle and rejected Kinnoch. But that only bought five years’ respite. Major, in a staggeringly misplaced aspect of kindness, put Kinnock into an EU sinecure, thus enabling him to enrich himself and his equally talentless family. Five years later, Blair was in. Do not allow the enemy to regroup; instead pound them into the dirt.

    • Paddy

      Absolutely!

  • Old Boss,New Boss, Meh!

    In other words, Miliband was totally incompetent, unable to cope in a World outside Academia.

    • Alexsandr

      perhaps that says something about academia, in that it lets misfits like miliband flourish.

  • http://weourselves.com/ Christian Wright

    “This SNP thing is hurting us. We’re slipping. If it stops, we’re okay. But if it doesn’t, we’re dead.’ As we know, it didn’t stop. But did Ed Miliband know?”

    He knew all right from covert counts of postal votes in the marginals. That’s why he went all finger-wagging theatrically strident on QT, absolutely ruling out any deal with the SNP

  • Arron Blue

    I think we should still give credit to Labour for the way they have helped the independence movement in Scotland.

  • Commenthead

    What an article, just so delicious to read. I fear the poor old metro-left haven’t even hit rock bottom yet. Personally I think you’d have to be mentally ill to want Ed Miliband as Prime Minister.

    • Alexsandr

      council eelctions next year. expect more labour losses. Then there is the boundary changes which will make the next GE even harder for labour.
      and I hope cameron fixes postal voting fraud. not holding my breath tho 🙁

  • davidofkent

    IMHO, the whole country knew in their heart of hearts that Ed Miliband was no Prime Minister-in-Waiting. I always felt that his coterie of ‘great brains’ was keeping the truth from him and egging him on to think that he was going to be a great leader. I’m sure that the fawning ‘Telemachus’ of these comments pages was typical of the Labour insiders who simply could not see what was staring them in the face. However, it was the thought of the SNP wagging the Labour dog that finally decided voters, I’m sure. Labour seem to have been taking the voters for granted for a very long time.

    • Icebow

      ‘Telemachus’, yes. Let us give thanks for the bounteous schadenfreude.

  • Ahobz

    Hubris; nemesis; two of the sweetest words in the English language.

    • Damaris Tighe

      ‘English’, Ahobz? 🙂

      • Ahobz

        It’s all Greek to me 😉

  • DavidL

    Did this country just dodge a bullet or what? Can we imagine the consequences of this man being PM? Just terrifying.
    That is 2 in a row from Labour. The first, overriding requirement of the new leader must be that he or she is sane and connected to planet earth. No ifs, no buts: sane.
    It really is not too much to ask of one of our major parties.

    • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

      I think he would have made a good leader.

      • Commenthead

        A good leader of what exactly? He certainly didn’t represent England (or Scotland!!!) A good leader of a Marxist reading group perhaps?

        • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

          Scotland is another issue, they are right to have a Scottish party in control.

          He represented most of what i stand for, and what most of my friends stand for. David Cameron represents the rich and powerful, which is not what most of us want.

          • Commenthead

            The electorate disagrees, you are on the wrong side of history I’m afraid. Maybe you (and your mates) need to learn more about Toryism and also read the current manifesto; believe it or not it’s about “cradle to grave”; hardly classic bastard Nazi Tory scum stuff at all really,.

          • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

            The electorate also disagrees with wanting the tories in power. 37% of the people who voted actually voted for them. Our voting system is just built in a way to not actually represent what the people thing. Tories got 6.86% more votes. Wow, such an overwhelming majority.

          • Commenthead

            We had a referendum on AV (sorry, more democracy there) and kicked it out. PR is endless coalition, the end of any conviction, politics as a bland mess. First past post is not perfect, but it has served the UK quite well and has the huge advantage of linking one MP to a constituency at a personal level. And put simply, I think you have to work harder to get elected with our system.

          • well_chuffed

            Agree with you entirely about PR but you forgot to mention that with PR , Portillo moments are either impossible or extremely rare. I shall never stop enjoying the vast number we witnessed last week.

          • Paddy

            “I shall never stop enjoying the vast number we witnessed last week”.

            Absolutely. This is going to keep me going all summer.

            I’m thinking of having a repeat performance tonight. It will be even more wonderful knowing the result…….especially the bit where Campbell and Jowell and Ashdown said the Exit poll was wrong.

          • well_chuffed

            It was so enjoyable wasn’t it. If I had time I would try to put a compilation video together so we could watch them one after another plus the pundits getting it all wrong time after time.

          • Paddy

            Yes, just like the goals on match of the day.

          • Alexsandr

            still waiting for the hat eating. another limp dump failed promise.

          • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

            We had a fear campaign on AV, in which the big parties and big companies like News Corp poured millions into protecting their interests.

          • Commenthead

            Here we go. Leftie desperate fear stuff. Yeah, it was a campaign of fear alright. Millions of us know that Miliband would have crashed the economy and wrecked the governance of this nation. Fear is a valid human response you know; it allows an organism to survive. As for News Corp, like all lefties you cannot credit the ordinary person with any intelligence. They don’t need “Rupert Nazi Bastard Murdoch Scum” (ban him, shoot him…yeah, man) to make up their mind.

          • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

            No, i mean the AV stuff was a fear campaign. All elections are fear campaigns in britain, we love negativity and moaning 😛

          • bikerboy

            Stop insulting us

          • Commenthead

            Forget all the fear stuff – it’s an absolute red herring. It’s much simpler than this. Britain is largely a fair-minded, centrist, sensible country and pro work ethic. It is not easily swayed into new ideas (quite rightly) but it does have a genuine sense of fair play and justice. Miliband was never going to get elected in the UK; he is at odds with the general “feel” of the electorate (Labour voters too don’t forget – his personal ratings were abysmal), he only spoke to the poorest 10 per cent of society and the top 2 per cent (whose money he wanted).

          • Alexsandr

            aV was a sh1t system. We should not have been bounced into a referendum without a proper dabate on the actual system to use, But the whole thing was a vanity project by clegg paid for by the taxpayer.

          • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

            We had a fear campaign in which huge companies and the big parties spend millions on protecting their interests. Playing on the publics emotions by suggesting it was going to cost hundreds of millions, when in fact it wasn’t, they had just bundled other costs, such as an electronic voting system in with it.

            There are much better systems. MMPR for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT0I-sdoSXU

          • bikerboy

            Check out the numbers for Blair, was it wrong then? Is UKIP ~4m votes 1 seat and SNP ~2m votes 56 seats OK?

            Can’t be selective.

            Epilogue: GE2010 Friday morning, Clegg having lost seats “Our system is broken”. 5 days later that system made him Deputy Dog and given the Libs a clutch of ministers.

          • Ahobz

            Here are all the numbers since 1945. No party has won 50% of the vote since WW2. The Conservatives hve come close in the 1950s so this this election is no different to any other; the “more people voted another way” excuse is no excuse, it always appplies.

            http://www.politicsresources.net/area/uk/uktable.htm

          • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

            I am not suggesting it’s an excuse. I am not even a labour supporter, i just think the system is wrong when a party with 36% of votes can claim a majority. Most people didn’t vote for them.

          • Paddy

            Well hard luck! Deal with it!!

          • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

            That’s the attitude! Let’s never change anything, even if it sucks!

          • Icebow

            The potential votes of the self-disenfranchised need not be of any account, beyond a more general educational concern.

          • Alexsandr

            very nearly 50% voted tory OR UKIP
            in england 55.1% voted tory or UKIP.
            So many are rejecting lefty stuff.

          • David Price

            In 2005 Labour’s lord & saviour T.Blair was elected with a Majority of 66 on a vote share of 35%. Didn’t hear the Left complaining then.

          • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

            No, but you did hear the Right complaining.

          • Alexsandr

            what about the 80 odd UKIP Mp’s we should have had. 3.89 million voted UKIP. If you are going to bleat about electoral unfairness then start with UKIP. Largest popular vote/MP ever.

      • Bogbrush

        You are one of the bunker staffers referred to in this article and I claim my £5.
        Seriously, you think a guy who commissioned the Ed Stone, and approved of the vacuous statements engraved onto it would make a good leader?

        • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

          Seriously, you think a guy that has lowered living standards to the lowest point in a long time, cut funding so much that people have actually died, made over 1 million people use foodbanks would make a good leader? Oh, you do? Interesting.

          • bikerboy

            The Left have a monopoly on social justice, moral rectitude and compassion? Hmmm. You think Lab are not authoritarian? You think condemning people to a life on welfare in exchange for their vote is right?

            Wages have been on the slide for at least 10 years. Under Broon public sector pay rises outstripped the private sector. May be you haven’t been working that long.

            Lab’s NHS killed a few… as I recall. Wars, declining education standards, cancer treatment stats… Lab were so great and that was before Marxist Ed thought he was tough enough.

          • Bogbrush

            See, this is the problem, you lot don’t even know your facts.
            Food was issued to a total of 1m people, but this was not 1m different people frequently, it was 1m instances. That could be 1m people once, or 30,000 people every day. In fact I believe very few people use them more than a few times.
            I bet you even think Margaret Thatcher closed most of the mines don’t you?

          • Carved In Stone

            The actual estimate is around half a million. It says on page five of the Trussell Trust report (where the one million number came from) that everyone was counted twice, since most people return once on average.

            If a mother goes to a food bank, and she’s married with two kids, that counts as four people. If she’s referred again later in the year, that counts as four more people.

            http://news.sky.com/story/1470021/the-truth-behind-food-bank-election-grenade

          • https://scottrobertson.me Scott Robertson

            You say that like it justifies the massive increase.

          • Carved In Stone

            Did I? I was just presenting the facts, unlike you.

            I assumed you didn’t know the number was wrong and that you were just repeating something you’d heard in the media.

            But seeing as you attack someone for merely pointing out your error, perhaps you’re propagating false information deliberately.

          • Alexsandr

            hey free food.
            whats not to like

          • Bogbrush

            You do know that 1m people didn’t use foodbanks don’t you? That piece of misinformation was debunked ages ago.

          • Alexsandr

            living standards. well that will be flat wages due to over supply of labour. and that is immigratiion. labour policy. Keep up.

    • Paddy

      They should have a medical like they do in America……..to make sure he is sane.

  • anxious

    i see the tories are truimphant with only 25 % of the british people voting for them.

    • Charlatans

      Anxious …..we are relieved more like. Only Labour and liberal unproductive parasites pronounce such hatred. The majority of us are charitable, forgiving, inspirational decent people, who want success for everybody.

      • anxious

        decent thats the last thing a tory is

        • Commenthead

          That is tens of millions of people. You must be mad to make such sweeping statements. Unhinged, dude.

          • anxious

            the last poster said that all liberals and socialists were parasites, what is this censorship

          • Ahobz

            No he didn’t. He said only Labour and Liberals produce such hatred. The “parasites” was gratuitous but that is no reason to misrepresent what he said..

          • anxious

            oh and the tories are as pure as snow, they never insult people a bit like the disgusting media campaign against every Labour leader in elections aided and abbeted by the bilionaire right wing foriegn owned press

          • Commenthead

            The BBC, Guardian, Daily Mirror….they bent over backwards to find Ed acceptable.

          • anxious

            no i asked the question do the tories never ever insult , bully and show hatred

          • Ahobz

            So answer his point rather than set up a straw man. Nevertheless the hatred voiced by the left, you know by saying, for instance ” decent thats the last thing a tory is” is notably more prominent than such sentiments expressed by right wingers against lefties, particularly within htecommentariat. The Guardian is full of articles expressing visceral hatred of Conservatives. You will not find the like in the right wing press, though you will on Guido and to some extent here and in the Telegraph comments.

          • noix

            Interesting statistics about the use of the word ‘scrounger’ by national newspapers over on Hannan’s twitter. The Guardian wins by a few 100%, says it all.

          • Charlatans

            Anxious…..Calm down. We understand, since those us who did not vote for Ed went through the same sort of feelings you now have, you know the terrible foreboding seeing all those polls on the BBC just before truthful ‘non-spin’ reality struck with exit poll on election night.

            It is such a shame you feel like you do. Hope you was not one of the demonstrators who could not face the truth and reality and went to knock the heads off a few Police in Downing Street to make the point?

    • Recce

      I love this bit of spin doing the rounds. Have you checked to see what percentage of eligible voters voted for Labour in 2001 and 2005? In 2001 it was 24.2% for 413 seats and in 2005 it was only 21.6% for 355 seats.

      I seem to remember Labour basking in yet another “landslide” in 2001.

    • Commenthead

      Personally I’m delighted. That 25 % got us 331 seats. Love this country!

      • anxious

        maybe but you dont speak for britain as a whole , scotland despise the tories as do most of northern england , a very hollow victory

        • Recce

          If you believe the SNP supporters they despise Labour or should I say “Red Tory Scum” just as much. And if Ed had managed to form a minority government propped up SNP, that would have been less than the 25% of eligible voters and still a hollow victory.

        • Alexsandr

          berwick upon tweed
          Hexham
          Penrith and the Border
          Carlisle
          Richmond(Yorks)
          Stockton South
          Scarborough and Whitby
          Thirsk and Malton
          Morecambe and Luneside
          Yorkshire East
          Beverley and Holderness
          haltemprice and Howden
          Selby and Ainsty
          York outer
          Elmet and Rothwell
          Morley and Outwood
          Pudsey
          Shipley
          Keighley
          Blackpool North and Clevleys
          Fylde
          Wyre and Preston north
          Ribble Valley
          Pendle
          South ribble
          Pendle
          Calder valley
          Rossendale and Darwen
          Bury north
          Bolton West

          That enough?

  • anxious

    so much for dave and his one nation, his new disabilties minster justin tomlinson has a fine record on disablity votes, voted in 2012 not to give people with cancer more than a year on esa, voted against giving disabled children exemption from bedroom tax, the tory law =the poor law

  • anxious

    why as the spectator deleted my post about justin tomlinson the new disabilties minister, are the right afraid of the truth and not wiling to engage

    • Recce

      Do you mean this post http://disq.us/8namtt ???
      It’s still there.

    • Alec

      Would it not have been better posting it on a thread about disability rights than one about Labour?

      • anxious

        but its still true , this is daves new one nation is it not

        • Alec

          Poor you, unable to find a single post about that. Maybe you’re part of the reason he won.

          ~alec

  • starfish

    So in the fuhrerbunker no-one would tell the Great leader what was really happening

    And this is supposed to be a democratic party?

  • Recce

    “when Miliband posed with the notorious Ed stone, …… a press officer ‘started screaming. He stood in the office, just screaming over and over again at the screen. It was so bad they thought he was having a breakdown”
    Sounds like something from “The Thick of It”. How can they do political satire when this is real life?

    • bikerboy

      Isn’t that why they stopped? Political life out-does it’s own satire.

      • Recce

        Pretty much what Armando Iannucci said.

        “In the Loop” had the bit where they had a character worried about a porn film showing up on their hotel bill. But before the film was released we had the expenses thing with Jacqui Smith’s husband watching porn and she claiming for it on expenses. Smith managed to turn the gag into repeating real life 🙂

        • bikerboy

          I see. So politicians believe in themselves so much you can’t even take the p1ss out of them.

    • Ahobz

      I had a hearty laugh at that bit (and several others)

    • Bogbrush

      Please can we have a one-off commissioned where Malcolm Tucker is on the Labour campaign. Obviously they’ll have to do an extended cut to fit in the expletives when the Ed Stone is released, plus some extra bits reserved for the DVD when he tells Lucy Powell what’s what.

      • Recce

        I can just imaging Tucker asking how progressive a stone tablet was. And his reaction to Lucy Powell going off message about the tablet, explaining what “written in stone” means.

  • Ahobz

    Thank God Balls did not end up as Chancellor. An MP who cannot figure out for himself that a majority of 1,101 needs his presence in the constituency if he is to be re-elected is a man with no common sense and so not fit for Parliament or office.

  • dustybloke

    Let’s give these people the benefit of the doubt. Let’s not sneer at them and mutter about the benefit of hindsight. But the same thing happened after Gordon lost (didn’t it Damian?). The rank and file were afraid or unable to speak the truth. Of course, that’s as true of the modern Tory party, but is this how we want our politicians to behave?

    Tories, because individualists tend to to be conservative, have a history of decapitation, which has never been the case in the Labour Party.

    The herd instinct is more prevalent among the left.

  • Ross

    Nice story Dan, but it’s bollocks. You are just a Miliband obsessive who can’t let it go. The truth is that Labour’s own internal polls were clear for many month before the election that the party was in trouble In fact Labour were fully expecting a mess in which Labour + SNP + Green would still leave them short of a majority.

    • Alexsandr

      evidence?

  • noix

    The problem seems to be that we have student politicians that never properly mature before trying to run the country.

  • Michael Worcester

    Fantastic article. I want more details eg what was the screamer screaming, who quit .This will make an even better play than the one I saw recently about Kinnock. I want to know about the internal reactions to the tory – lite economy policy, the vacuous immigration policies. Whoever writes a kiss and tell book will make a fortune

  • krishnan gurning-leftie

    excellent article – i love the balls bit – he never wanted balls as chancellor

  • olliebear1516

    My view is that Labour are far more comfortable with defeat than they are with victory, unlike the Tories. The Left wing comfort zone which Labour slipped back in to under Miliband’s guidance condemned them to defeat the very day they elected him as leader. Guess what – Labour are now an irrelevance in this country, and they have been since 1979. Tony Blair understood that – which is why they got rid of him.
    Here’s my prediction – Labour to be the official Opposition for another 15 years.

    • Paddy

      “Labour to be the official Opposition for another 15 years”.

      Oh, longer than that……at least 25 years.

      • Alexsandr

        unless another party over takes them……

  • wudyermucuss

    We live in a newspeak society.
    Obviously,some,including many at the top,believe the deluded drivel they spout.

  • Impromptu

    It seems some things in politics really are carved in stone. You just don’t win elections if your leader is unpopular and you aren’t trusted on the economy.
    You can sit in your ivory tower, surrounded by young idealistic reformers who agree with your every word, popping out every now and then to be filmed preaching to the converted. But no matter how much zeal you have for reform, you can’t reform gravity.
    A personal observation from a YouGover. I became so thoroughly sick and tired of an election campaign that went on far too long and descended into silly panto that I haven’t taken part in a survey for three weeks. I suspect many others felt and did the same. There’s one possible reason why the late swing wasn’t detected.

    • Rupert

      The polls showed what they wanted too. They were skewed in favour of young voters and constantly showed that Cameron was more popular and more viewed as more competent than Miliband.

      • Impromptu

        If that’s right, then even the traditionally left youth vote found Cameron more credible than Miliband.
        It may sound like I’m being wise after the event, but for months now I’ve been saying that the losers at this election would be the polling industry, for many reasons. It’s fairly obvious that I’m not a Labour voter, but I like to think I’d have been saying the same thing even if I were.

        • Rupert

          Yep Boris Johnson said in an interview that Lydon (their campaign guru) that personal polling is the most important factor when someone is alone in the polling booth. I imagine this is even more important for the youth vote as if they are not passionate about the guy (like they were with Obama & Blair) they won’t bother to vote.

      • JohnLaw1

        I thought it was real people ( i.e people who actually work or otherwise contribute) who actually voted, do you have a problem with that?

        • Rupert

          Nope i lived in Australia where everyone has to vote and you don’t know how hard it is there to elect a right wing gov

          • Impromptu

            Ha! Thanks for giving us Nitalie Binnit – I mean that, really.
            She’s an endless source of entertainment.

          • Icebow

            That bleating incarnation of mass self-righteous resentment. She may well have helped to unmask the mad reality of Miliband.

  • Rupert

    Dan got it right years ago when he said the 33% strategy would never work. Ed never bothered going for the middle ground as he thought he could win if he appealed only to his base. As his base wasn’t going anywhere I can see why he was so convinced until the end. Its a bit sad that Ed Balls lost his seat but i’m sure that Miliband thought that the needs of the masses outweighed the needs of one MP.

    • Alexsandr

      but labours base in t’grim north is being nibbled by UKIP. Loads of second places if you look.

      • Rupert

        2nd place is first loser

  • JohnLaw1

    “He created his own world andLIVED in it”

    Sums up the Labour Party!

    • Sean Lamb

      Sums up politicians.

      I don’t see how Ed Milliband’s behaviour is any different to Mitt Romney – or any political party that was within a few percentage points of winning.
      The SNP success in Scotland has disguised how much better Ed Milliband did in England and Wales compared with 2010.

      • Jackthesmilingblack

        err … Mili…

        • http://www.ukip.org/ Too Old To Join UKIP

          Err … What is your point?!

          • Alexsandr

            milipede?

          • http://www.ukip.org/ Too Old To Join UKIP

            The Millipede?! Two L’s in this case and with a definite article, definitely!

          • Alexsandr

            maybe the electorate are fed up with these metric leaders and yearn for an old imperial measures leader. like michael foot?

            (Sorry -old joke from HIGNFY)

          • http://www.ukip.org/ Too Old To Join UKIP

            Very droll! And, alas, Labour in its current form is finished without all of their Scottish MPs. Blair, Brown, Millipede and the Millipede were all Neo-Trots, Blarites, Brownites or whether the Millipede cared to call himself a Socialist or not.

  • Olisa

    Wanted Miliband to be the PM but if this article is right then I feel very disturbed. He’s been painted as a fanatical ideologue here. He’d have been the left’s answer to Thatcher. The ironic thing about Miliband’s core vote strategy is that despite failing to make in roads into the Southern England marginals the core vote also fragmented under his watch with Scotland going SNP and UKIP making hey day in certain constituencies by splitting the old Labour vote.

    Next Labour leader must be one who takes it to the centre ground again and revives New Labour. Labour needs to make head way into those Southern England marginal seats and win places like Finchley again by appealing to the aspiration of the middle classes like Blair did. Of course there is a risk that this may alienate the Northern core vote and Scottish heart land even more BUT Labour can’t try to out SNP the SNP or out UKIP UKIP on immigration. It just won’t work. Labour has to be the party for radical devolution in order to appeal to the diverse interests of different parts of the UK. For example, be the party that promises Scotland much more widespread fiscal autonomy.

    The next leader can’t be someone who like Miliband tries to lurch the party into one ideological camp or the other and alienate vast sections of the population. Next Labour leader must appeal to the centre ground and hopefully now the Tories have the majority they will get the full pelting from the population from all government incompetence, sleaze and ideological excess without the Lib Dems there to shield them from the blame. If there is any consolation of the defeat it is that this Tory government will most likely be ripe for the taking in 2020 as it bickers over Europe and other matters.

    • Alexsandr

      i think cameron will give the scots fiscal independance. Spend their own tax take. Nice black hole for nicola to fill with cuts or more taxation. The scots will love that. Revenge served cold.

  • TNL

    “The implication is that Miliband thought he would run a minority government after an election that might depose his shadow chancellor. And that he considered this no bad thing.”

    Wow. If that’s true then the ruthlessness I associated with Miliband Minor was pretty boundless. And it does solve one of the mysteries of the campaign for me – why, if the Labour party were heading into fraught negotiations to secure a minority government, did they not do more to protect one of the key players at the top of the party? Turns out Miliband didn’t want him.

    • Impromptu

      No mystery. The Eds could barely stand to be in the same room together.
      Personally I feel like a rugby scrum half – glad to see the back of Balls.
      As for MIliband – Mr Values has dumped the kids, dumped the constituency, dumped the party and jetted off for a bit of Jagerbombing and ‘aving it large. Another PR triumph.
      Presumably the monolith will soon be residing in one of his toilets with an extra point chiselled on – 7. Now wash your hands.

      • TNL

        Oh, I know they hated each other but I’m still surprised that Miliband would hang him out to dry in such a way. It is not unlike (albeit not exactly the same) a scenario where a Blair leaves a Brown to fall at the polls despite his importance in the party.

        Miliband b*uggering off to Ibiza is an choice tempered by the relief that the country as a whole made a better choice and he now has far too much time on his hands. As for the Edstone, it should be rubble by now.

        • Impromptu

          Well you could argue that Blair delivered a perfect hospital pass to Brown anyway. No fan of the man at all, but you have to admire his timing.
          Heaven forbid Miliband actually has to start spending some time in his constituency. Poor old Donny. There’ll no doubt be a book deal too…
          Chapter One
          “It is, and let me thank you for reading and just say this to you, because it’s important and I want to say it because it’s important, a truth universally acknowledged (hell, yeah) that a hard-working NLP MP up and down our country with a squeezed middle and a cost of narrative crisis…”
          It’ll make Tristram Shandy look like Janet & John.

          • TNL

            Oh God yeah, Blair was and is a terrible person, but his timing was impeccable – got out just in time to avoid the global economic deluge that destroyed his successor’s reputation and premiership.

            And I can’t imagine Miliband’s inevitable book will fly off the shelves. Not until it is time for it to be pulped.

          • Alexsandr

            99p at the works?

  • rod

    Maybe there is a god after all.

  • David

    Hoorah to the Speccie and to Dan. Great. Now can we have a book please, and a TV documentary?

    • Impromptu

      No need. Just take The Thick of It and overdub the names.

      • bikerboy

        Apparently The Thick of It is not “out there” enough even for Ed’s Lab.

        • Impromptu

          You can imagine a Tuckering of the monolith, can’t you?
          “Look you ****-for-****ing-brains ****er, if you didn’t exist there are ****ing simple ****ing organisms as yet undiscovered under the sea that wouldn’t ****ing bother inventing you.”

  • Alec

    He appears to have upset the Labour Press Team:

    https://twitter.com/labourpress/status/598797437541732353

  • Bob Harris

    The Labour Party secretly knowing they’d lose is a conspiracy too far. The simple truth of the matter is that people made their minds up late, and when you’re dealing with a tight race and tiny swings (like 7%) it’s practically impossible to predict.

    • Alexsandr

      no they didnt. they were lying to the polls. and the polls were rubbish. except for the exit poll

  • Murgatroyd

    In other words the loser lost, which is how it should be.

  • e2toe4

    Has nobody done a *downfall* edit yet out in the wide world…..

  • Dominic Stockford

    I was standing (minor party candidate) in Twickenham – and it was also Monday before polling day when I began to realise that the Tories were quite likely to win it.

  • paul

    Dan Hodges = David Cameron’s bitch !!

    • bikerboy

      So he is told what to write? Is that your point?

  • anxious

    at least all the spivs and the chancers on the square mile are happy, victory delivered by the murdoch empire and the rest of the lying right wing billionaire foreign owned press

    • Carved In Stone

      BBC News gets over 4 million viewers a night. The Sun sells less than 2 million. Sky News got 3.5% of viewers on election night, the BBC 63%.

      • anxious

        the torygraph ,rothmere and the blackshirts at the mail,85% spread the fear message motivated by self interest and to brainwash the masses as usual

        • Carved In Stone

          Do you have sales figures for any of those publications?

          The BBC got over 6 million viewers on election night. Sky News got about 350 thousand. If there’s any brainwashing going on, I think it might be the Labour supporters who’ve been zombified.

          • anxious

            will be another 2-3 miilion when you cobble it altogether, even the bbc gave in to the tory bullies

  • David davis

    You know, er, given what sorts of things socialist parties are in favour of, and given the sorts of people they don’t like, isn’t it time we had a proper debate about whether socialist parties ought to be allowed at all in proper modern liberal minimal-statist countries?
    Then…we could set about _removing them from_ places like Venezuela and most (or rather all) of Africa, and so on; what a result that would be for the Human Race.

    • Robert_Eve

      We can dream!!

    • Callipygian

      Yes, but unfortunately our own principles of democracy require that they be free to present their distorted view of the world everlastingly to the voters. Voters may learn, but socialists never will.

  • Daviejohn

    Great article particularly liked,”He created his own World and lived in it”…. Terrific line..Ed’s World. I shudder to think of the carnage in the Business sector that would have occurred had Red Ed succeeded in his plan.

    • Callipygian

      Note that the markets went up (but of course) when the Tories won. They’re not silly.

  • SeanLM

    Michael Foot, Neil Kinnock, Gordon Brown and now Ed Miliband– creepy weirdos are more of a feature of Labour’s leadership rather than the exception. Maybe someone in that party should ask why the average Labour voter would be more popular running in an election than the average Labour candidate. Better yet, I hope they don’t reflect on it seriously. Keep rioting. Keep blaming the voters and the “media” (i.e. a small handful of tabloids and newspapers). Keep losing.

  • anxious

    that old saying comes to mind when reading the drivel on here, the tories know the price of everything an the value of nothing

    • bikerboy

      How so?

  • Hugh Curran

    The machinations are all fascinating, but at the end of the day it’s the last paragraph that is most telling. The reason people didn’t vote for Labour was because of this very issue that Miliband is steered by theory and surrounded himself with people who wouldn’t make him uncomfortable. It would appear this made the electorate uncomfortable and they didn’t vote for them. Will Labour now look at the real issue, which is how they allowed themselves to walk into an election with a leader that clearly wasn’t the right man to lead them?

    • Callipygian

      But how can there really be a ‘right man’ of a party whose assumptions are so wrong?

      • Hugh Curran

        In your opinion, their assumptions are wrong (I’m assuming you’re talking about their assumptions about the British economy, how to run the country and generally govern here. IF not then the rest of this comment is twaddle so apologies).

        The fact is that there are always going to be different ways people see a country should be run. Being Irish I’ve grown up with coalition governments and I feel cheated because ruling by committee is never a good idea. At least that’s my opinion. The thing about politics is that a party’s assumptions are based on the leaders viewpoint. It is plainly obvious that the electorate didn’t buy into Miliband’s viewpoint and assumptions. You can be pretty sure that the new leader will look at the polling data and all that kind of stuff and a new viewpoint will be forthcoming.

        I don’t think it’s as easy to split the main parties in Ireland along their policy line. You’re lucky in the UK. Our two major political parties are basically carbon copies of each other.

        • Callipygian

          Hi Hugh. By assumptions I meant the Leftist Weltanschauung rather than particular policies — though Miliband’s ‘assumption’ that a law ‘against Islamophobia’ would be desirable, while also not itself being illegal, shows exactly how dearly he holds freedom (not) and how fit he is to lead a liberal democracy (not).

  • paul

    I wish Hodges would write his resignation speech !!!

    • bikerboy

      Like Ed did, you mean?

  • Rzzr
    • bikerboy

      Didn’t disappoint. Like how they got the reckless and provocative bits in…

    • Callipygian

      I loved that line ‘Christmas at Mum’s will be h-ll’.

    • Recce

      That’s quite a good one

  • *Innocent Face*

    Its not just Labour which were in a state of delusion, but the left wing media behemoth, the BBC, which had convinced itself there was going to be a Labour-SNP coalition. They obsessed about nothing else for 10 days prior to polling day.

  • swatnan

    Normally I don’t have much time for Hodges, but this article was good.

  • RedMiner
  • crackenthorp

    What a load of tosh from a third rate journalist, not one piece of truth, mind you it is written by a failed advisor who was kicked out of Labour and now vents his spleen at every opportunity

    • RocketDodger

      Well, Dan is white, English and I’m going to hazard a guess here that he didn’t vote Labour ergo he is ‘Evil’ (c) Guardian and Independent!!!

  • Ringstone

    ‘They knew what was happening nationally two weeks out, they knew what that meant for Ed’s seat. And they sat on it.’
    ‘When he was working on his victory speech with Greg Beales [his speech
    writer] the exit poll was announced. They stopped, and someone came in
    and said, “Don’t worry, that poll’s wrong.” So they carried on writing.’
    Two mutually exclusive accounts in the same piece, and not a word of, what’s it called; journalism – about which one was right or how they could both be held in the same collective head. Quality.

  • Sue Ward

    I haven’t enjoyed an article so much in ages, this article would make an excellent film: “The Madness of King Ed”.

  • Arthur Saget

    This is how Marxism collapses.

  • Dynamo11

    Miliband truly enjoyed what it was like to be at the top of a left leaning country such as the USSR. Partial data that fed his own delusion and sycophantic allies who were nought but yes men to whatever he said

  • John Andrews

    When did Dan run naked down Whitehall? He said he would: https://twitter.com/dpjhodges/status/280038576283062273

    • Jen The Blue

      I for one have no desire to see that. Though to be fair to Dan, I think he is being sponsored to do it?

      • John Andrews

        I don’t want to ‘see’ it either – but I would like to hear that he has kept his word. So I think that, until he does it, someone should ask the question every time Dan writes for the DT.

  • RocketDodger

    Hats off Dan, that’s a good report. Thank god the electorate saw sense.

  • Guardian’s best social worker

    Duplicitous to the end. Even with themselves.

  • BlueElephant

    In 2010, 68 per cent of black and minority ethnic voters opted for Labour, compared with only 16 per cent who backed the Conservatives. Surveys mention that Indian community switched their support drastically this time to Tories from less than 20% in 2010 to more than 70% in this election. That’s a huge swing.

    No wonder, Labor have done real bad.

  • bikerboy

    Anyhooo…. Ed’s gone off to Ibiza to give Justine a seeing to. Fine. Next milestone will be his reappearance in the HoC. Guess he’ll be pleased no more PMQs.

  • imw101

    I wonder what they will think of that over at labourlist.org

  • bikerboy

    The more I read this article the funnier it gets. How on Earth Ed managed to rise so far above his station while being so out of touch and time is something only he knows.

  • Hegelman

    It is also vital to know why the Tories are doomed in the longer term.

    Their demographic, to put it bluntly, is dying out. They win because of blue rinse old ladies with fat pensions and skilled worker turned crabbed bigot in riper years.

    Both are on the way out and are not coming back.

    The Britain of the next few decades will be a browner one.

    Labour has lost a battle but it is winning the future.

    • MrEbolaVirus

      Dribbling commies have been saying that since the 60s. But there are always older people, in fact they are an ever-growing portion of the population.

  • Hegelman

    And what is the great future for Dan?
    A man who rats on his own party will not be trusted by any other.

  • Hegelman

    “Ed Miliband was an idealist until the end. He surrounded himself with academics, took inspiration from political textbooks and had an extraordinary ability to detach himself from the hue and cry of daily politics. He created his own world and lived in it. This explains his preternatural calm and his astonishing self-belief — but it also explains why he drove his party over a cliff.”

    All this about one election in which Labour actually increased its vote share by twice as much as the Tories.

    Come on, Dan. Have a sense of humour. Is this the end of the world you are so worried about?

    It’s an election. You win some, you lose some.

    Ed is not Hitler in 1945, for gosh sakes. Get a perspective.

    And what has Cameron gained?

    The chances are very high that Scotland will be out of the UK in a few years. And Cameron will be in charge when that unbelievable humiliation of the country and its reduction to a joke in the world happens.

    Ed is well out of this, to be honest.

    If I had to choose between being in the shoes of Cameron or Ed today I would think very hard indeed. The choice is far from obvious.

  • Hegelman

    Really, really?
    Did Ed do himself in like Adolf in 1945?
    Do tell us, Dan.

  • Hegelman

    “Either Ed’s the best actor in the world, or he genuinely thought he was going to win right up until the end.”

    To be fair, the polls suggested he had a good chance.

    • Alexsandr

      well the polls need a good looking at. are they biased. were the results faked for some agenda?

    • William_Brown

      The polls were led, and, in some cases, carried out by the left leaning MSM, who, as the left does, looked upon it’s wishes and dreams as an actual reality.

  • Hegelman

    Man, you are as doleful as a horse’s ass, Dan.

    You need to lighten up.

    There are always defeats in life and they have to be met with ironic laughter. Here is a good movie clip to help you see what is needed. It is the great scene from “The Treasure of the Sierra Madre” where the two gold diggers have had their precious gold dust blown away by the wind. See how they react and realise what a petty minded ninny you are:

    https://ca.video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_ylt=A2KIo9pUyVVVvTMAkEI87olQ;_ylu=X3oDMTByZ2N0cmxpBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDdmlkBHZ0aWQDBGdwb3MDMg–?p=treasure+of+the+Sierra+madre%2C+joke&vid=091beff2de86b92cd85a90f1a35da5a7&l=1%3A28&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts2.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DWN.0R9tLUhEMuAPDM2h9iTJyA%26pid%3D15.1&rurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D3IX-sP6QP4k&tit=The+Treasure+of+the+Sierra+Madre.flv&c=1&sigr=11bpdhfts&sigt=1140ah4qq&sigi=11vo1c48j&age=1287072000&fr2=p%3As%2Cv%3Av&fr=yhs-avg-fh_lsonsw&hsimp=yhs-fh_lsonsw&hspart=avg&type=ff.37.w81.hp.04-01.ca.avg._.0415tb&tt=b

  • bikerboy

    Ed went back to his constituency and prepared for government.

  • Ben Gil

    The country’s mood changed, it was quite evident in the press and social media. I am surprised that Labour’s top staff never spotted that their policies were wrong.

  • Ady Miles

    Well written article! I feel sorry for Ed though

  • John Andrews

    Ditching Ed Balls would be a feather in Miliband’s cap. He was the architect of Labour’s taxing and spending sprees.

  • Marino

    marxist israeli like so many in the U.S. who pile on support and money to their illegal mother-land. relieved milibunk was defeated.

  • fred finger

    I like the film ‘Downfall’, where the Germans especially ‘him’ were in denial of the situation and no one prepared to say what the real situation was.

    Can’t see much difference to Miliband and Labour HQ.

  • MrEbolaVirus

    Ed ‘Gumby’ Balls was defending a majority of just 1100, yet seemed not at all concerned. Now he’ll have plenty of time to think some more about post-neoclassical endogenous growth theory.

  • paulus

    Miliband knew they knew they were going to lose, they had no choice but to fight on, as for the zen like state that was shock.

    Its very unfair to lay all the blame on Miliband, a 35% strategy was a very achievable objective.

    Labour was wiped out in Scotland, its incredible, under pressure in the North and disconnected in the South. This wasn’t all his fault it years and years or even decades of how the Labour party has operated. They have been caught in a perfect storm of their own making.

  • The PrangWizard of England

    Ed, the kind of man who would probably have turned into a Comrade Stalin figure had he won, and who would have attempted to turn Britain into a form of Soviet Russia. There are those in the party now who think that that would be have been no bad thing.

  • William_Brown

    Dan. The answer to your headline question is; ‘No’. There was no Machiavellian plot, no suspicious ‘goings on’. Labour lost the election for many, many reasons – please get over it and do try to stop over analysing – It’ll be better for you if you just start to accept it.

  • http://batman-news.com The Commentator

    Who cares about the detail, the important thing is that this party of traitorous, duplicitous reptiles LOST!

Close
Can't find your Web ID? Click here