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Andrew Lambirth rss

‘Moonrise and Pale Dancer’ by Derek Hyatt

The man who brought Cubism to New York

20 September 2014
Max Weber: An American Cubist in Paris and London, 1905–15 Ben Uri, 108a Boundary Road, NW8
Derek Hyatt: Time Glides in Secret Art Space Gallery, 84 St Peter’s Street, N1

The American Jewish artist Max Weber (1881–1961) was born in Belostok in Russia (now Bialystok in Poland), and although he visited this country twice (he came to London in 1906… Read more

‘A Battery Shelled’, 1919, by Percy Wyndham Lewis

The Imperial War Museum finds a deadly place to display first world war masterpieces

13 September 2014
Truth and Memory: British Art of the First World War Imperial War Museum, London
The Great War as Recorded through the Fine and Popular Arts Morley Gallery, 61 Westminster Bridge Road, SE1

The Imperial War Museum has reopened after a major refit and looks pretty dapper, even though it was overrun by hordes when I visited (it was still the school holidays).… Read more

Still Life with Carrots (c. 1921) by Duncan Grant

The Bloomsbury painters bore me

6 September 2014
Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision National Portrait Gallery
Colour, Light, Texture: Portraits by Matthew Smith and Frank Dobson National Portrait Gallery

Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) claimed that nothing has really happened until it has been recorded, so this new exhibition at the NPG devoted to her life can only now be said… Read more

‘I wish my boyfriend was as dirty as your policies’, 2011,by Coral Stoakes

Agitprop, love trucks and leaflet bombs: the art of protest

30 August 2014
Disobedient Objects V&A
Maps to Memorials: Discovering the Work of MacDonald Gill The Lettering Arts Centre, Snape Maltings

Titles can be misleading, and in case you have visions of microwave ovens running amok or washing machines crunching up the parquet, be reassured — or disappointed. Disobedient Objects, the… Read more

‘Futurist Motif’, 1920, by Gerardo Dottori

Futurism’s escape to the country

23 August 2014
Gerardo Dottori: The Futurist View Estorick Collection

Futurism, with its populist mix of explosive rhetoric (burn all the museums!) and resolutely urban experience and emphasis on speed, was a force to be reckoned with (at least in… Read more

‘The Sutherland Cup’ by Angie Lewin

The perfect excuse to get out all the best Ravilious china

16 August 2014
Designing the Everyday: from Bloomsbury and Ravilious to the present day Towner, Eastbourne
Peggy Angus: Designer, Teacher, Painter Towner, Eastbourne
Discovering Palmer’s Kent: Samuel Palmer, Graham Sutherland and Paul Drury Mascalls Gallery, Paddock Wood, Kent

A day trip to the Towner Art Gallery in Eastbourne is a summer pleasure, and two concurrent shows are proving a considerable draw, with their focus on design and applied… Read more

‘Equivalents for the Megaliths’, 1935, by Paul Nash

A lost opportunity to show John Nash at his best

9 August 2014
Brothers in Art: John and Paul Nash Royal West of England Academy, Queen’s Road, Clifton, Bristol

John Northcote Nash (1893–1977) was the younger brother of Paul Nash (1889–1946), and has been long overshadowed by Paul, though they started their careers on a relatively even footing. The… Read more

‘Goose Woman’, c.1840, by George Smart

Why did it take so long to recognise the worth of British folk art?

2 August 2014
British Folk Art Tate Britain
Keith Vaughan in Essex The Fry Art Gallery, Castle Street, Saffron Walden

British folk art has been shamefully neglected in the land of its origin, as if the popular handiwork of past generations is an embarrassment to our cultural gurus and the… Read more

‘The Scyther (Mower)’, 1912, by Kazimir Malevich

Malevich: Are Tate visitors ready for this master of modernism?

26 July 2014
Malevich Tate Modern

Kazimir Malevich (1879–1935) is one of the founding fathers of Modernism, and as such entirely deserves the in-depth treatment with which this massive new Tate show honours him. But it… Read more

‘Paul Newman’, 1964, by Dennis Hopper

Had Hollywood not lured him away, Dennis Hopper could have made his name as a photographer

19 July 2014
Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album Royal Academy, Burlington Gardens
Radical Geometry Royal Academy

In an age when photographs have swollen out of all proportion to their significance, and are mounted on wall-sized light boxes the better to show off their high-resolution colour, it’s… Read more

‘Hawk Pouncing on Partridges’, c.1827, by John James Audubon

Painted, sculpted and stuffed: a history of the bird in art

12 July 2014
The Wonder of Birds Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery

These days, as the sparrows and starlings so common in my youth are growing scarce, there’s less need for a rarity like the osprey or butcher bird (the red-backed shrike)… Read more

‘After the Bath (Le repos après bain)’, 1897, by Edgar Degas, at Stephen Ongpin

Charles Hadcock – taking on the age of speculation with sculpture in the City

5 July 2014
Charles Hadcock: Elements 60 Threadneedle Street, EC2
The Art of Pastel Stephen Ongpin Fine Art, 6 Mason’s Yard, Duke Street, SW1
Phillip King Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 & 11 Duke Street, SW1

As the boundary between auction house and art dealer blurs yet further, with auctioneers acting increasingly by private treaty as well as taking over commercial galleries, and as West End… Read more

‘Tondo the Winged Hours of the Seabirds’ by Keith Grant

Oceans and forests in kaleidoscopic flow – discovering Keith Grant

28 June 2014
Keith Grant Chris Beetles Gallery, 8 & 10 Ryder Street, St James’s, SW1

For decades I’ve been aware of the work of Keith Grant (born 1930), but it is only in recent years that I have come to know it at all well.… Read more

Inspired and springing draughtsmanship: ‘Femme dans la nuit’, 18 April 1945, by Jean Miró

The painter who channelled the forces of gravity

21 June 2014
The Last Waltz: New Work by an Old Man Hastings Arts Forum, 36 Marina, St Leonards-on-Sea
Chillida on Miró Ordovas, 25 Savile Row, W1

Tragically, Ian Welsh (1944–2014) did not live to see this exhibition of his latest work. Diagnosed with terminal cancer on the eve of his 70th birthday, he struggled to finish… Read more

‘Prince Pig’s Courtship’ by Paula Rego

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition offers up the good, the bad and the ugly – and a sore neck

14 June 2014
Summer Exhibition Royal Academy

One of the great traditions of the RA’s Summer Exhibition has always been that each work submitted was seen in person by the Hanging Committee, passed in front of their… Read more

‘Coventry Cathedral’, 1940, by John Piper

Kenneth Clark wasn’t happy simply popularising art, he liked to collect it and shape it too

7 June 2014
Kenneth Clark: Looking for Civilisation Tate Britain

Earlier this year, I sat down and watched Kenneth Clark’s groundbreaking TV series Civilisation. I vaguely remember when it was first screened in 1969, but was too young to appreciate… Read more

‘Stranger III’, 1959, by Lynn Chadwick

Can Lynn Chadwick finally escape the 1950?

31 May 2014
Lynn Chadwick: A Centenary Exhibition Osborne Samuel, 23a Bruton Street, W1
Lynn Chadwick: Retrospectives Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square, W1

Lynn Chadwick was born 100 years ago in London, and died in 2003 at his Gloucestershire home, Lypiatt Park, where he is buried in the Pinetum. He was one of… Read more

‘Steps’, 1931, by Josef Albers

Josef Albers: roaring diagonals and paradisiacal squares

24 May 2014
Josef Albers: Black and White Waddington Custot Galleries, 11 Cork Street, W1

Josef Albers (1888–1976) is best known for his long engagement with the square, which he painted in exquisite variation more than a thousand times. A German–American painter, he trained in… Read more

‘Stratford St Mary’, 2012, by Justin Partyka

A photographer sheds new light on Constable Country

17 May 2014

The phrase ‘Constable Country’ summons up a quintessentially English landscape: river and meadows, open vistas bordered by trees, the greens and golds of cultivated acres, with the wide (and often… Read more

‘Composition With Fish’ by Jankel Adler, on show at Goldmark Gallery

The hidden, overlooked and undervalued: Andrew Lambirth’s spring roundup

10 May 2014

Jankel Adler (1895–1949), a Polish Jew who arrived in Glasgow in 1941, was invalided out of the Polish army, and moved to London two years later. A distinguished artist in… Read more

‘Herring Fisher’s Goodbye’, 1928, by Christopher Wood

A fresh perspective on reassuringly familiar artists

3 May 2014
Art and Life: 1920–1931: Ben Nicholson, Winifred Nicholson, Christopher Wood, Alfred Wallis & William Staite Murray Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge

This exhibition examines a loosely knit community of artists and their interaction over a decade at the beginning of the last century. It is centred around the marriage of Ben… Read more

‘Icarus’, 1943, by Henri Matisse, maquette for plate VIII of ‘Jazz’, 1947

The Matisse Cut-Outs is a show of true magnificence

26 April 2014
Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs Tate Modern

Artists who live long enough to enjoy a late period of working will often produce art that is radically different from the achievements of the rest of their careers. Late… Read more

‘Livia da Porto Thiene and her daughter Deidamia’, 1552, by Veronese

The National Gallery's Veronese is the exhibition of a lifetime

19 April 2014

Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) is one of the great painters of the Venetian School, often joined in an unholy trinity with Titian and Tintoretto. But he was not Venetian, and only… Read more

Design by William Kent for a cascade at Chatsworth, c.1735–40; below, the Bute epergne, 1756, by Thomas Heming, designed by Kent

William Kent was an ideas man - the Damien Hirst of the 18th century

12 April 2014
William Kent: Designing Georgian Britain Victoria and Albert Museum

How important is William Kent (1685–1748)? He’s not exactly a household name and yet this English painter and architect, apprenticed to a Hull coach-painter before he was sent to Italy… Read more

Mysteriously ravishing: ‘Santo Spirito’, 2013, by Arturo Di Stefano

It’s the whisper you’ve got to listen for in Arturo Di Stefano’s paintings

5 April 2014
Arturo Di Stefano: Fat Over Lean Purdy Hicks Gallery, 65 Hopton Street, SE1

One of the paintings in Arturo Di Stefano’s impressive new show at Purdy Hicks Gallery is called ‘Santa Croce’ and it depicts the arcaded cloister of the church in Florence… Read more