Books

A Sikh member of the Indian Army Services Corps at Dunkirk, 1940

Britain didn’t fight the second world war — the British empire did

25 July 2015 9:00 am

Had it not been for the empire, Britain might have lost the second world war, says William Dalrymple. The war certainly lost Britain the empire

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Owen Sheers disregards the first commandment of novel-writing: to show, not tell

6 June 2015 9:00 am

This is a thriller, a novel of betrayal and separation, and a reverie on death and grieving. The only key…

sports

Nation-builders on a sticky wicket: the farce and heroism of Pakistani cricket

16 August 2014 9:00 am

There is farce in Peter Oborne’s history of cricket in Pakistan. An impossible umpire is abducted by drunken English tourists…

Lord Mountbatten discloses Britain's partition plan for India Photo: Getty

Hope for one of the most turbulent, traumatised regions in the world

25 January 2014 9:00 am

John Keay’s excellent new book on the modern history of South Asia plunges the reader head first into some wildly…

Malala

Malala's voice is defiant — but how much can she change Pakistan? 

26 October 2013 9:00 am

In 2012 a Taleban gunman, infuriated by Malala Yousafzai’s frequent television appearances insisting that girls had a right to education,…

Dangerous territory

14 April 2012 11:00 am

Fifteen years ago Ahmed Rashid wrote an original, groundbreaking and wonderful book about the Taleban, a subject about which few…

Pakistan: A Personal History by Imran Khan

29 October 2011 10:00 am

Imran Khan’s Pakistan: A Personal History describes his journey from playboy cricketer through believer and charity worker to politician. His…

The enemy within

3 September 2011 12:00 am

The most telling figure in Carey Schofield’s book on the Pakistan army is Faisal Alavi, a major general who was murdered in November 2008.

Imperfect working order

14 May 2011 12:00 am

The publication of Pakistan: A Hard Country could not be more timely.

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Blood relatives

12 May 2010 12:00 am

The last time I saw Benazir Bhutto was at Oxford, over champagne outside the Examination Schools, when she inquired piercingly of a subfusc linguist, ‘Racine? What is Racine?’ Older and richer than most undergraduates, and as a Harvard graduate presumably better educated, she was already world famous, and was obviously not at Oxford to learn about classical tragedy.

Division and misrule

29 December 2008 12:00 am

‘The 20th century was not kind to Pakistan’, Tariq Ali says in the first sentence of his latest book on his native land.