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Guest Notes

Inauguration notes

21 January 2017

9:00 AM

21 January 2017

9:00 AM

The Worst President

When it was said that Malcolm Turnbull is the worst Australian Liberal Prime Minister since Sir William McMahon, my reaction was: ‘How very unfair to Sir William’. But what if it were said that Barack Hussein Obama is the worst US President since Jimmy Carter, or indeed Richard Nixon? That would be very unfair to Carter, who, after all, only lost Iran – unlike Obama who endowed the terrorist-supporting regime with $150 billion and cleared the way for the Mullahs to acquire nuclear weapons. It would be equally unfair to Nixon whose Watergate was a misdemeanour compared with the Benghazi cover-up where the US Ambassador and three operatives were abandoned to be slain by Islamic terrorists.

To those who would canonise Obama, not so much because he is the world’s greatest autocue reader but because he was the first black president, two things should be made clear. A leader’s colour, race, and sex (not gender), like a bus driver’s, is irrelevant. Nor should we use elites’ Newspeak and say ‘gender’ (a grammatical term) when we mean ‘sex’. To do so is to accept the anti-Western Marxist propaganda our politicians have put into our schools, just as standards decline, that there are no differences between male and female and that by such measures as breast-binding, penis-tucking and hormone ingesting, children are free to choose.

As Stanley Kurtz warned in Radical-in-Chief, Obama never abandoned his own such radical socialist convictions. But with a complicit media, he succeeded in removing them from effective scrutiny. Once in office, Obama showed his true intentions, running down the military, rewarding enemies like Iran, and betraying allies from the Poles to the Czechs to Israel. Unopposed by a weak republican establishment, Obama constantly undermined constitutional government.


Obama’s disdain for the rule of law and the Constitution was well demonstrated by Senator Cruz in the current Senate nomination hearings. Cruz selected eight examples, ending each with the telling reminder that notwithstanding their declared concern for the rule of law, the Democrats on the committee had remained silent.

The examples were: using Operation Choke Point to force the banking industry to deny credit to businesses, not on the basis of illegality but on the basis of political incorrectness (the administration used the investigative powers of the taxation authorities in a similar way); sending millions of dollars of taxpayers’ money to the so-called ‘sanctuary cities’ defying federal immigration law; refusing to apply federal immigration law and unilaterally rewriting those laws; releasing tens of thousands of illegal aliens, including rapists; paying a nearly $2 billion ransom to Iran contrary to federal law; ignoring and rewriting provision after provision of Obamacare contrary to the text of the law; signing off illegal recess appointments which the Supreme Court had to strike down unanimously and releasing five Guantanamo terrorists without the required notification to Congress. If this were not bad enough, when the election went against Hillary Clinton, Obama used his executive powers to sabotage the new administration’s agenda rather than ensuring a normal, smooth transition.

The world was astounded when, just before Christmas and Hanukkah, Obama not only refused to use the Security Council veto to protect Israel from a hostile resolution, but coordinated its passage. Then he expelled dozens of Russian diplomats over hacking allegations, only to be disappointed when Vladimir Putin decided not to rise to the bait. Obama followed this by approving the delivery by the same Russia of sufficient uranium to Tehran to build ten nuclear bombs. The reason was the Iranian government twice violated the notorious nuclear deal Obama had engineered by keeping more than 130 metric tons of a heavy-water material used in the production of plutonium. Caught out, the ‘Death to America! Death to Israel!’ chanting Mullahs barefacedly demanded compensation. Obama actually agreed. Americans are entitled to wonder in whose interests he has been working. Then, in agreement with Raul Castro, Obama ended the decades long ‘wet foot, dry foot’ policy which allowed escaping Cuban refugees to become legal US residents. They’re now to be handed back.

In the twilight of his presidency, Obama is not only taking foreign policy initiatives more appropriate to a new administration. He has tried to derail Trump’s announced energy policy – the policy on which he was elected – by imposing only now what he hopes will be a permanent ban on new oil and gas drilling in US waters in the Arctic and Atlantic oceans.

Obama’s last-minute measures extend to disturbing the fundamental federalist principles set out in the Constitution. As Mark Levin points out, its ratification could never have been achieved without those principles being adopted and respected; including the decentralisation of the police and America’s unique decentralisation of the electoral process. Unlike Australia’s, America’s system has the advantage that weaknesses in the electoral process, even an openness to fraud, cannot be imposed across the United States. If this occurs in one state, it is exposed to comparison with the better practices prevailing in other states. But now the head of Homeland Security, Jeb Johnson, has rushed through a designation of the nation’s state and local election systems as ‘critical infrastructure’. This is designed to ensure federal officials will be able to control the detailed running of elections, taking away the advantages the Founding Fathers so wisely saw in competitive federalism among the sovereign states.

Obama’s abuse of his authority has led to calls for an earlier and more controlled transfer of authority after an election with Mark Levin proposing a convention of the states to effect this and other reforms. This is no surprise. Obama’s actions, unreasonable and even irrational, are against the letter and spirit of the Constitution. No other president, at least in living memory, has behaved so badly.

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