Isabel Hardman Isabel Hardman

David Cameron’s final plea to Scottish voters

David Cameron has just delivered one of the best speeches of his career in Aberdeen. It was emotional, sincere, clear. The Prime Minister pleaded with Scots to stay in the United Kingdom. It ranged from warnings that this would be a permanent separation – ‘when people vote on Thursday they are not just voting for themselves, but for their children and grandchildren and the generations beyond’- to powerful images of something the peoples of the Union have built being torn apart:

‘For the people of Scotland to walk away now would be like painstakingly building a home – and then walking out the door and throwing away the keys. So I would say to everyone voting on Thursday, please remember. This isn’t just any old country. This is the United Kingdom. This is our country.’

It was very, very good. But whether or not it will shift any votes in Scotland, the PM's words could certainly shift things south of the border. He also let slip a key line that shows 'No' is now only the lesser of two evils in the eyes of many of his own MPs. He said: 'But you can get real, concrete change on Thursday: if you vote 'No'. 'Business as usual' is not on the ballot paper. The status quo is gone. This campaign has swept it away.' That's an acknowledgement that the changes promised to Scots if they do vote to stay are not minor ones. And there is a groundswell of irritation in Westminster that this has been decided without any proper debate or scrutiny.

That anger about devo-more will only really erupt if there is a 'No' vote, and for the time being, things are far too close to start focusing on that being the result.

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