Arts

‘Broadway’, 1954, by Marvin E. Newman

The forgotten photographer whose artistry is finally being celebrated

20 May 2017 9:00 am

New York photographer Marvin E. Newman has had to wait until the age of 89 for his artistry to be recognised. Laura Gascoigne spoke to him

Doodles by Winnicott’s child patients, including one (Fig. 9) by a boy who transformed the psychoanalyst’s squiggle into a sculpture

Why Britain's greatest psychoanalyst, Donald Winnicott, loved doodles

20 May 2017 9:00 am

Robert Adès explains why Donald Winnicott, one of Britain’s greatest psychoanalysts, loved doodles

‘Children Playing’, 1953, by Kenneth Armitage

It’s about time we recognised the genius of Kenneth Armitage

20 May 2017 9:00 am

What is it about Yorkshire, particularly Leeds, that it has bred or trained such a succession of famous modern sculptors?…

‘The Deckcheyrie For Unbalconied Flats… will be found to work perfectly, we shouldn’t wonder. If not we’re sorry’, from How to Live in a Flat, 1936, by W. Heath Robinson and K.R.G. Browne

There was method to the madness of Heath Robinson’s extraordinary illustrations

20 May 2017 9:00 am

I first came across the extraordinary creations of the artist and illustrator William Heath Robinson at least 60 years ago.…

Folly by Phyllida Barlow, British Pavilion, Venice, 2017

Huge, diverse and yet monotonous, the Venice Biennale is very like the EU

20 May 2017 9:00 am

‘Are you enjoying the Biennale?’ is a question one is often asked while patrolling the winding paths of the Giardini…

Why on earth has the BBC created a radio drama with visuals?

20 May 2017 9:00 am

Two extremes of the listening experience were available on Monday on Radio 4. The day began conventionally enough with Start…

Much of Scottish Opera’s Bohème is spot-on – but it begins with an act of petty vandalism

20 May 2017 9:00 am

When a composer begins an opera, they create a world. You don’t need a full-scale overture: the tear-stained violins that…

BBC1’s Three Girls is a harrowing, believable & brave account of the child-grooming scandal

20 May 2017 9:00 am

I’ve often thought that a good idea for an authentic TV cop show would be to portray the police as…

Honey-glazed rural whimsy: Laura Donnelly (Caitlin) and Paddy Considine (Quinn) in Jez Butterworth’s The Ferryman

A good show but some way short of a classic: Jez Butterworth's The Ferryman reviewed

20 May 2017 9:00 am

Jez Butterworth’s new play The Ferryman is set in Armagh in 1981. Quinn, a former terrorist, has swapped the armed…

You will lose the will to live: Snatched reviewed

20 May 2017 9:00 am

We love Amy Schumer. Fact. And we love Goldie Hawn. Fact. But can we love Snatched? Not so much, if…

A load of old bull: Picasso wearing a bull’s head intended for bullfighters’ training, Cannes, 1959

John Richardson: Bullfighting with Picasso

13 May 2017 9:00 am

Picasso had a thing for bulls. Martin Gayford talks to the artist’s friend and biographer. Sir John Richardson about a lifelong obsession

A damn fine cup of coffee: Sherilyn Fenn and Kyle MacLachlan in the original Twin Peaks

Twin Peaks: the ultimate study in nostalgia

13 May 2017 9:00 am

The return of Twin Peaks is part of a wave of Nineties nostalgia, says Peter Hoskin

How the KGB infiltrated classical music

13 May 2017 9:00 am

Spare a thought for Emil Gilels, still revered today by Russians as the foremost pianist of the Soviet era. The…

The prodigal daughter: Ellie Kendrick as Clover in The Levelling

A painterly exercise in grim atmospherics: The Levelling reviewed

13 May 2017 9:00 am

There are bigger entities landing at your local multiplex this week. An ancient indestructible franchise is re-re-(re-)booted in Alien: Covenant.…

The country full of teenagers

13 May 2017 9:00 am

Imagine living in a country where the average age is under 16 (in the UK it’s currently 40 and increasing)…

The bemused protagonist with a stupid name: Ricky Whittle as Shadow Moon in American Gods

This isn’t drama as most of us understand it: American Gods reviewed

13 May 2017 9:00 am

Since completing season two of the brilliant Narcos, I’ve been unsuccessfully looking for a replacement serial drama that is more…

Gilbert & Sullivan’s characters never exist below the waist: ETO’s Patience reviewed

13 May 2017 9:00 am

English Touring Opera is playing safe this spring, with Tosca and Patience, and was rewarded, in Cambridge at least, with…

Simpering windbags and self-pitying egoists: Halina Reijn, Jude Law and Gijs Scholten van Aschat in Obsession

Worthless as entertainment, priceless as platitudes-to-avoid-at-all-costs: Obsession reviewed

13 May 2017 9:00 am

Obsession at the Barbican has a complicated provenance. The experimental Belgian director Ivo van Hove adapted the show from a…

Bach at its most bruising and gruff: Kyung Wha Chung at St George’s, Bristol, reviewed

13 May 2017 9:00 am

Coined in 1944, ‘completism’ is a modern term for a modern-day obsession. What began as a phenomenon of possession —…

As good a record as this rapidly dying genre deserves: Blondie’s Pollinator reviewed

13 May 2017 9:00 am

Ah, Blondie. Those happy days of glorious power pop, chilly disco and rich, fruity vocals — Debbie Harry yearning away…

The Body Zone, centrepiece of the Millennium Dome, a true symbol of the fatuousness, vapidity, incompetence and dishonesty that later characterised the Blair government

My part in the expensive calamity that was the Millennium Dome

6 May 2017 9:00 am

Stephen Bayley, creative director (briefly) for the Millennium Dome, lifts the lid on an expensive calamity

‘The Caged Bird’s Song’, 2014–2017, by Chris Ofili

Chris Ofili’s weird watercolour tapestries mark a return to form

6 May 2017 9:00 am

Many of the mediums from which art is made have been around for a long time. People have been painting…

The finest Wotan around: Latvian bass-baritone Egils Silins

I still have no idea what the LPO’s Belief and Beyond Belief season was about

6 May 2017 9:00 am

The London Philharmonic Orchestra’s ‘Belief and Beyond Belief’ season is drawing to a close, without making it in any degree…

Sweet and sour: Michelle Holmes (Sue, centre) and Siobhan Finneran (Rita, centre right) in ‘Rita, Sue and Bob Too’

Thirty years on, Rita, Sue and Bob Too remains one of Britain's greatest films

6 May 2017 9:00 am

Hilary Mantel called the film ‘remorselessly indecent’, but William Cook fell head over heels in love with Rita, Sue and Bob Too

1932. Right, John Cockcroft adjusts a pump at the Cavendish Laboratory's atom splitter. Left, Ernest Walton sits working in the detector of a Cockcroft-Walton generator.

Britain’s Nuclear Bomb: The Inside Story was as good as its word – I wish it was longer

6 May 2017 9:00 am

Like most documentaries, Britain’s Nuclear Bomb: The Inside Story (BBC4, Wednesday) began by boasting about all the exclusives it would…