Arts feature

Gary Raymond and Richard Burton in Tony Richardson’s 1959 film version of Look Back in Anger

What a relief we can finally admit Jimmy Porter was a pain in the neck

19 January 2019 9:00 am

Gary Raymond, one of the original stars of Look Back in Anger, tells Steve Morris what he – and most other people – really thought of John Osborne’s angry young man

Pounds of flesh: Takayasu throws Takakeisho to the ground to win the 2018 Kyushu tournament in Fukuoka

The balletic, bum-baring rituals of sumo

12 January 2019 9:00 am

Dance critic Louise Levene investigates the balletic, bum-baring rituals of sumo

Writers of some of the best-loved programmes in British television history: Ian La Frenais and Dick Clement

Dick Clement on Porridge, Kirk Douglas and having seven projects on the go

5 January 2019 9:00 am

Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais are still going strong after more than 50 years. James Walton discovers their secret

‘The Nativity’, 1470–75, by Piero della Francesca

The fascinating story behind one of the best-loved depictions of the Nativity

15 December 2018 9:00 am

Martin Gayford tells the fascinating story behind one of art history’s best-loved depictions of the Nativity

The people have not forgotten me: the exiled Empress of Iran interviewed

15 December 2018 9:00 am

The widow of the Shah of Iran was painted by Warhol and assembled the greatest collection of art outside of Europe. Will Heaven meets her

True stories: Gary Kemp in 1971

Gary Kemp on pop, Pre-Raphaelites, politics and playing Pinter

15 December 2018 9:00 am

Gary Kemp is enjoying a comeback. He talks to Michael Hann about pop, the Pre-Raphaelites, politics and playing Pinter

David Schwimmer has produced a new film of Alexander Zeldin’s play LOVE for the BBC. [Photo: Jose M. Osorio/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images]

David Schwimmer on his new BBC film

8 December 2018 9:00 am

David Schwimmer liked Alexander Zeldin’s play about poverty so much he has made it into a film. Tanya Gold got a preview

Read The Spectator article that gave birth to musical minimalism 50 years ago

8 December 2018 9:00 am

Fifty years ago, in a review by composer Michael Nyman, The Spectator helped christen a musical movement that came to dominate the world

Twiggy photographed by Justin de Villeneuve in the Rainbow Room at Big Biba, early 1970s. [JUSTIN DE VILLENEUVE]

A short history of art deco – from high art to two-tone shoes, garden gates to Twiggy

1 December 2018 9:00 am

Peter York traces the history of art deco – from high art to two-tone shoes, and beyond

Court in the act: Simon Paisley Day as Sir Walter Raleigh in Ralegh: The Treason Trial at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

Join a Jacobean jury at the Globe. Early modern theatre goes immersive – will it work?

24 November 2018 9:00 am

Would a modern jury have convicted Sir Walter Raleigh of treason? Kate Maltby considers the evidence

‘He strikes me dumb with admiration.’ Van Gogh on Howard Pyle’s pirate illustrations

The facts – and fiction – of piracy

17 November 2018 9:00 am

Horatio Clare explores the fact – and fiction – of piracy

What do we learn from these poppies ‘weeping’ from a tower in Derby?

For the sake of art as much as society, it’s time to stop remembering the war

10 November 2018 9:00 am

For the sake of art as much as society, we need to stop remembering and start forgetting, says Simon Jenkins

The Gyorgy and Marta show: the nonagenarian couple have been an unlikely hit on YouTube

One of the last living avant-gardists speaks – Gyorgy Kurtag on his new Beckett opera

10 November 2018 9:00 am

Musical revolutionary and YouTube star Gyorgy Kurtag is preparing to première his first opera, based on Beckett’s Endgame, at La Scala. Norman Lebrecht meets him

Never handsome, just sensuous and dangerous: Kevin Spacey

Bring back Kevin Spacey

3 November 2018 9:00 am

Spacey the actor was always fascinating because he was amoral

A major modernist hiding in plain sight: composer Ennio Morricone at 91

‘Darmstadt taught me how to compose’: Ennio Morricone interviewed

27 October 2018 9:00 am

For all his commercial success, Ennio Morricone is a modernist of uncompromising seriousness, as Richard Bratby finds out

Gothic revival: Strawberry Hill House

Strawberry Hill revived

20 October 2018 9:00 am

Michael Snodin celebrates the splendours of Strawberry Hill revived

‘I go against my instincts to be just an actor’

‘I should just shut up’: Dominic West on #MeToo and the perils of talking politics

20 October 2018 9:00 am

Dominic West talks to Melissa Kite about #MeToo and the perils of discussing politics

‘Your Britain: Fight for it Now’, 1942, by Abram Games

Is modernist architecture not good for our health?

13 October 2018 9:00 am

Are our buildings killing us? Stephen Bayley reports

‘The Agony in the Garden’, c.1458–60, by Giovanni Bellini

Bellini vs Mantegna – whose team are you on?

6 October 2018 9:00 am

Laura Freeman on Mantegna and Bellini, two brothers-in-law whose contrasting art pitched drama against devotion

Reluctant sex object: Brett Anderson, lead singer of Suede, in 1993

Brett Anderson on fame, fear and hitting 50

29 September 2018 9:00 am

Brett Anderson talks to Michael Hann about fame, fear and hitting 50

Fantastic beasts and where to find them: ‘Wild Woman with Unicorn’, 1500–10

A brief history of unicorns

22 September 2018 9:00 am

A brief history of unicorns by Laura Freeman

What a scorcher: bearing the brunt of Harold Pinter’s temper was one of life’s central experiences

The night I kissed Harold Pinter

22 September 2018 9:00 am

Craig Raine remembers Harold Pinter

‘The Miracle of St Mark Freeing a Slave’, 1548, by Tintoretto

Tintoretto unmasked

15 September 2018 9:00 am

Ambitious bon viveur or ruthless, manipulative cheat? Daisy Dunn goes in search of the real Tintoretto

‘A Voluptuary under the horrors of Digestion’, 1792, by James Gillray

From ancient Egyptian smut to dissent-by-currency: I object at the British Museum reviewed

8 September 2018 9:00 am

Ian Hislop’s potted history of dissent at the British Museum shows that the impulse to do a two-finger salute is universal, says Tom Slater

Like a multistorey car park on the run, Kengo Kuma’s V&A Dundee sits alongside R.F. Scott’s polar expedition vessel, RRS Discovery

From jute, jam and journalism to video games and the V&A: the transformation of Dundee

1 September 2018 9:00 am

After decades of post-industrial decline, Dundee is reinventing itself as a thriving cultural hub, says Claudia Massie