Arts feature

‘He strikes me dumb with admiration.’ Van Gogh on Howard Pyle’s pirate illustrations

The facts – and fiction – of piracy

17 November 2018 9:00 am

Horatio Clare explores the fact – and fiction – of piracy

What do we learn from these poppies ‘weeping’ from a tower in Derby?

For the sake of art as much as society, it’s time to stop remembering the war

10 November 2018 9:00 am

For the sake of art as much as society, we need to stop remembering and start forgetting, says Simon Jenkins

The Gyorgy and Marta show: the nonagenarian couple have been an unlikely hit on YouTube

One of the last living avant-gardists speaks – Gyorgy Kurtag on his new Beckett opera

10 November 2018 9:00 am

Musical revolutionary and YouTube star Gyorgy Kurtag is preparing to première his first opera, based on Beckett’s Endgame, at La Scala. Norman Lebrecht meets him

Never handsome, just sensuous and dangerous: Kevin Spacey

Bring back Kevin Spacey

3 November 2018 9:00 am

Spacey the actor was always fascinating because he was amoral

A major modernist hiding in plain sight: composer Ennio Morricone at 91

‘Darmstadt taught me how to compose’: Ennio Morricone interviewed

27 October 2018 9:00 am

For all his commercial success, Ennio Morricone is a modernist of uncompromising seriousness, as Richard Bratby finds out

Gothic revival: Strawberry Hill House

Strawberry Hill revived

20 October 2018 9:00 am

Michael Snodin celebrates the splendours of Strawberry Hill revived

‘I go against my instincts to be just an actor’

‘I should just shut up’: Dominic West on #MeToo and the perils of talking politics

20 October 2018 9:00 am

Dominic West talks to Melissa Kite about #MeToo and the perils of discussing politics

‘Your Britain: Fight for it Now’, 1942, by Abram Games

Is modernist architecture not good for our health?

13 October 2018 9:00 am

Are our buildings killing us? Stephen Bayley reports

‘The Agony in the Garden’, c.1458–60, by Giovanni Bellini

Bellini vs Mantegna – whose team are you on?

6 October 2018 9:00 am

Laura Freeman on Mantegna and Bellini, two brothers-in-law whose contrasting art pitched drama against devotion

Reluctant sex object: Brett Anderson, lead singer of Suede, in 1993

Brett Anderson on fame, fear and hitting 50

29 September 2018 9:00 am

Brett Anderson talks to Michael Hann about fame, fear and hitting 50

Fantastic beasts and where to find them: ‘Wild Woman with Unicorn’, 1500–10

A brief history of unicorns

22 September 2018 9:00 am

A brief history of unicorns by Laura Freeman

What a scorcher: bearing the brunt of Harold Pinter’s temper was one of life’s central experiences

The night I kissed Harold Pinter

22 September 2018 9:00 am

Craig Raine remembers Harold Pinter

‘The Miracle of St Mark Freeing a Slave’, 1548, by Tintoretto

Tintoretto unmasked

15 September 2018 9:00 am

Ambitious bon viveur or ruthless, manipulative cheat? Daisy Dunn goes in search of the real Tintoretto

‘A Voluptuary under the horrors of Digestion’, 1792, by James Gillray

From ancient Egyptian smut to dissent-by-currency: I object at the British Museum reviewed

8 September 2018 9:00 am

Ian Hislop’s potted history of dissent at the British Museum shows that the impulse to do a two-finger salute is universal, says Tom Slater

Like a multistorey car park on the run, Kengo Kuma’s V&A Dundee sits alongside R.F. Scott’s polar expedition vessel, RRS Discovery

From jute, jam and journalism to video games and the V&A: the transformation of Dundee

1 September 2018 9:00 am

After decades of post-industrial decline, Dundee is reinventing itself as a thriving cultural hub, says Claudia Massie

Bad Ischl: the spiritual home of Viennese operetta, and where Franz Joseph signed the declaration of war on Serbia

Operetta is serious business in Bad Ischl – and seriously glorious

25 August 2018 9:00 am

Richard Bratby travels to the forgotten spa town of Bad Ischl to experience the enduring glories of a much-mocked art form

Let there be light: the Atlantic footballfish dwells 3,000 feet below the surface of the ocean. [Paulo Oliveira / Alamy Stock Photo]

How to live in a world without light: Life in the Dark at the Natural History Museum reviewed

18 August 2018 9:00 am

What is it like to live in a world without light? Mark Cocker reports from the dark side

Before the dawn: Sir Edward Elgar, Sir Dan Godfrey, Sir Alexander Mackenzie and Sir Charles Stanford, seated. Standing: Sir Edward German and Sir Hubert Parry. Bournemouth Centenary Festival, 1910

Music's Brexit

11 August 2018 9:00 am

Only by ignoring European taste, and daring to be vulgar, did British music finally come of age, argues Richard Bratby

Captain Scott’s 1911 expedition to Antartica, with the Terra Nova anchored in the background, from The Colour of Time

The artist who breathes technicolor life into historic photographs

4 August 2018 9:00 am

Marina Amaral brings black-and-white photographs back to life with colour. But, she tells Laura Freeman, she never changes their story

‘Lovely’ is the word that best sums up the National Garden Scheme

Why the National Garden Scheme beats the Chelsea Flower Show hands down

28 July 2018 9:00 am

Isabel Hardman on the joys of nosying around other people’s flower beds

Life is a cabaret: Barry Humphries and Meow Meow

Barry Humphries on Trump, transgender ‘rat-baggery’ and causing maximum offence

21 July 2018 9:00 am

Lloyd Evans talks to Barry Humphries about Brexit, transgender ‘rat-baggery’ and pre-cataclysmic art

‘Never work’: graffiti on the walls of Nanterre University, March 1968

How situationism changed history

14 July 2018 9:00 am

Luke Haines on the situationists – the avant-garde art movement that sparked off the riots and foresaw the future

Queen Victoria’s ‘State Barge’, 1866–7, by James Henry Pullen

The ‘idiot’ artists whose surreal visions flourished in Victorian asylums

7 July 2018 9:00 am

Laura Gascoigne on the ‘idiot’ artists whose surreal visions flourished in Victorian asylums

One of Britain’s first mosques, the Shah Jahan,Woking, completed in 1889 and financed by the female ruler of Bhopal

The problem with British mosques

30 June 2018 9:00 am

Britain is crying out for mosques that reflect the reality of the modern West, says Ed Husain

The reluctant frontman: Ray Davies

‘I think The Kinks could have found a better frontman’: Ray Davies interviewed

23 June 2018 9:00 am

At 74, Ray Davies is as sharp as ever. Michael Hann talks to him about America, angry groupies and being a reluctant frontman