Arts feature

Pink Floyd’s Ummagumma, 1969, photography by Aubrey Powell and Storm Thorgerson

The album art that dazzled a generation

29 April 2017 9:00 am

James Walton talks to Aubrey Powell, the man behind the album art for virtually every 1970s rock band you can think of

A Kentish girl: Gemma Arterton as Catrin in ‘Their Finest’

‘People would speak to me as if I was an idiot’: Gemma Arterton on the horrors of Hollywood

22 April 2017 9:00 am

As she moves into producing, Gemma Arterton tells Tanya Gold why she hated Hollywood and nearly gave up acting

Architectural Mecca: Notre Dame du Haut, Ronchamp, by Le Corbusier

Vatican II gave carte blanche to architecture’s wild men, with overwhelming results

15 April 2017 9:00 am

In the 1960s, the Catholic Church gave carte blanche to architecture’s wild men, says Jonathan Meades, with overwhelming results

Left: ‘Étude pour la tête d’Hamadryade’, 1895-1908; right: ‘La Valse’, 1889-1895

The sexual ecstasy of Camille Claudel – and why it proved too much for the establishment

8 April 2017 9:00 am

Camille Claudel’s extravagant talent proved too provocative for the male art establishment of her day, says Laura Gascoigne

Joint account: a scene from ‘The Great Wall’, China’s most expensive film to date

The new battleground between China and America: Hollywood

1 April 2017 9:00 am

Peter Hoskin reports on the uneasy alliance between the US and Chinese film industries

‘Absent Friends’, 2000–1, by Howard Hodgkin

Howard Hodgkin claimed not to be an abstract artist. So what exactly was he?

25 March 2017 9:00 am

The late Howard Hodgkin stated emphatically that he was not an abstract artist. So what exactly was he? asks Martin Gayford

‘The Judgment of Solomon’, c.1506–9, by Sebastiano del Piombo. © National Trust Images/Derrick E. Witty

Was Sebastiano imitating Michelangelo or – a startling thought – vice versa?

18 March 2017 9:00 am

Martin Gayford is mystified by the mismatched working partnership between Michelangelo and the painter Sebastiano del Piombo

American beauty: ‘Standard Station’, 1966, by Ed Ruscha

How art chronicled the birth – and death – of the American dream

11 March 2017 9:00 am

How art chronicled the birth – and death – of the American dream, by Stephen Bayley

A Neapolitan quartet, Naples 1955

How on earth do you put 1,600 pages of Elena Ferrante on stage?

4 March 2017 9:00 am

How do you distil Elena Ferrante’s monumental Neapolitan quartet into four acts over two evenings? Laura Freeman finds out

It’s electrifying: Nikola Tesla in his lab, 1901

Poetry, animals, perms and Bovril are all part of the sparky history of electricity

25 February 2017 9:00 am

Poetry, animals, perms and Bovril are all part of the sparky history of electricity, writes Richard Holmes

‘Portrait of a Musician’, thought to be Claudio Monteverdi, c.1590, by a Cremonese artist

The true radical genius of Monteverdi is not in the operas but in the madrigals

18 February 2017 9:00 am

On his 450th anniversary, Alexandra Coghlan celebrates the composer’s remarkable musical prescience

‘Explosive eruption of Vesuvius viewed from Naples, October 1822’ by George Poulett Scrope Frontispiece from Considerations on Volcanoes, 1825

The pulling power of volcanoes, from Empedocles to J.M.W. Turner

11 February 2017 9:00 am

At a new exhibition in the Bodleian Libraries Laura Gascoigne discovers the pulling power of volcanoes

On the waterfront: The Deep, Hull

How Hull won me over

4 February 2017 9:00 am

James Walton finds a lot to love about this year’s City of Culture – even on a bleak January weekend

Martin Gayford celebrates the quiet, underrated masterpieces of Michael Andrews

28 January 2017 9:00 am

Martin Gayford celebrates the quiet, underrated masterpieces of Michael Andrews

Paradise regained: Milton Keynes shopping centre (now called thecentre: mk) in 1972

Milton Keynes is 50 years old. Should we celebrate?

21 January 2017 9:00 am

We may snigger at Milton Keynes but let’s not forget its utopian spirit, says Stephen Bayley

‘The Four Elements’, before 1937, by Adolf Ziegler, which hung above Hitler’s fireplace

Was Nazi art really that bad?

14 January 2017 9:00 am

Bad men and bad politics don’t necessarily equal bad art. So perhaps it’s time to reassess Hitler’s taste in painting, says William Cook

Rackham frontispiece: ‘Hey! Up the chimney, Lass! Hey after you!’, from ‘The Ingoldsby Legends, or Mirth & Marvels’

Disney, Biba, Laura Ashley, Tim Burton – all owe a debt to the great Arthur Rackham

7 January 2017 9:00 am

Laura Freeman celebrates the riotous imagination of tidy, thrifty, cautious Arthur Rackham

‘Bolshevik’, 1920, by Boris Mikhailovich Kustodiev

The USSR, USA, David Hockney and plywood: Martin Gayford on the visual treats of 2017

31 December 2016 9:00 am

Martin Gayford looks forward to two big Russian shows coming to London next year – and to other visual treats on offer in 2017

Left: Maíno, 1612–14: ‘The Adoration of the Kings’ Right: ‘The Adoration of the Shepherds’

O come, let us adore this little-known Spanish painter

10 December 2016 9:00 am

Martin Gayford is dazzled by two Adorations by a little-known Spanish painter

Painting with light: a Polaroid shot on vintage film by photographer Alex Cad

The magic of Polaroid – and how I rescued it from oblivion

3 December 2016 9:00 am

Florian Kaps celebrates the magic of Polaroid – and describes how he rescued it from oblivion

Drama queen: Claire Foy as Elizabeth and Matt Smith as Prince Philip in Netflix’s ‘The Crown’

Is it curtains for BBC drama?

26 November 2016 9:00 am

Power is ebbing from the once-mighty BBC drama department to the likes of Netflix. But is it terminal? Neil Armstrong has the inside story

The Elephant House at London Zoo, designed in 1964 by Casson Conder Partnership

Want to understand your animal side? Head to the Wellcome Collection

19 November 2016 9:00 am

We’ll do anything to forget we are animals. Charles Foster hails a forthcoming exhibition that makes us face up to reality

Amusing ourselves to death: Faye Dunaway as Diana Christensen in Sidney Lumet’s ‘Network’

The 1976 film that foretold the rise of Trump, invented reality TV and made suicide a spectacle

12 November 2016 9:00 am

Tanya Gold on the 1976 film that foretold Donald Trump’s presidency

Maps are as much about art – and lies – as science

29 October 2016 9:00 am

Maps reveal the psychology of their creators as much as they describe topography, says Stephen Bayley

David Hockney and Martin Gayford on how pictures literally emerged from the shadows

22 October 2016 9:00 am

In an edited extract from their new book, David Hockney and Martin Gayford discuss how pictures emerged from the shadows