Arts feature

In 1985 it was ‘the most expensive building ever built’: HSBC’s Hong Kong headquarters designed by Norman Foster

From Stansted to corporate swank: superstructuralism has a lot to answer for

7 April 2018 9:00 am

Foster and Rogers wanted to save the planet – in fact, their high-tech architecture did the opposite, says Phineas Harper

Games without frontiers: Ian Cheng’s ‘Emissaries Guide – Narrative Agents and Wildlife’ (2017)

The artist who creates digital life forms that bite & self-harm. Sam Leith meets him (and them)

24 March 2018 9:00 am

The artist Ian Cheng creates digital life forms that bite and self-harm. Sam Leith meets him (and them)

Discomfort and joy: the director Ruben Ostlund, whose films are funny but subtly savage

The subtly savage world of filmmaker Ruben Ostlund

17 March 2018 9:00 am

Ruben Ostlund’s films scrape away the veneer of liberal civility to reveal our true animal nature. Jasper Rees meets him

Cherchez la femme: ‘Reclining Nude (Femme nue couchée)’, 1932, by Pablo Picasso

Peak Picasso: how the half-man half-monster reached his creative – and carnal – zenith

10 March 2018 9:00 am

James Woodall on Picasso at his creative – and carnal – zenith

The 1958 world première of Pinter’s The Birthday Party at the Lyric Hammersmith: John Stratton as McCann, John Slater as Goldberg and Richard Pearson as Stanley

The last survivor of The Birthday Party’s 1958 première remembers the traumatic first night

17 February 2018 9:00 am

Critics love The Birthday Party now. But that wasn’t always the case, says Jasper Rees

Are cruise liners the solution to the housing crisis?

10 February 2018 9:00 am

You won’t catch her on a cruise, but an exhibition at the V&A makes Daisy Dunn wistful for the golden age of travel

A right laugh: Geoff Norcott

What's it like being one of the only right-wing comics around?

3 February 2018 9:00 am

Lloyd Evans meets Geoff Norcott, Britain’s first ‘openly Conservative’ comedian

‘Anne Cresacre’, c.1527, by Hans Holbein the Younger

A sumptuous feast of an exhibition: Charles I at the Royal Academy reviewed

27 January 2018 9:00 am

Martin Gayford is overwhelmed by the sheer concentration of visual splendour amassed by Charles I

Conduct unbecoming: clockwise from top left, Leonard Bernstein, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Charles Dutoit and James Levine

The sex lives of conductors

20 January 2018 9:00 am

Norman Lebrecht on classical music’s dirty secret

Premier performance: Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill

Andrew Roberts’s guide to Churchill on screen

13 January 2018 9:00 am

Andrew Roberts on the challenges of playing Churchill

Claude Debussy and his daughter Chouchou near Arcachon, France, 1915

Debussy, Tippett and Wagner: the musical treats of 2018

6 January 2018 9:00 am

Richard Bratby on the musical treats in store over the year to come

There’s something about Mary: ‘Madonna of the Rosary’, 1539, by Lorenzo Lotto

The time has come for one of the most fascinating and idiosyncratic Renaissance artists

16 December 2017 9:00 am

Lorenzo Lotto was overlooked by 16th-century Venice, but now, says Martin Gayford, his time has come

Leslie Nielsen and Jeannette Charles in The Naked Gun

From good witch to female Alan Bennett: the Queen on the big screen

9 December 2017 9:00 am

Good witch, victim or female Alan Bennett? Tanya Gold on how Elizabeth II has been portrayed on screen

Monkey business: Jane Goodall

An exceptional new film about Jane Goodall unearths a remarkable love story

2 December 2017 9:00 am

Mary Wakefield talks to the director Brett Morgen, whose film about Jane Goodall tells a remarkable love story

‘A Cellar Dive in the Bend’, c.1895, by Richard Hoe Lawrence and Henry G. Piffard

A short history of flash photography

18 November 2017 9:00 am

A short history of flash photography, by Kate Flint

François Cluzet as paraplegic billionaire Philippe and Omar Sy as his carer Driss in Untouchable (2011)

Why does so much disabled theatre and film still treat us like victims to be pitied?

11 November 2017 9:00 am

Does disability make a difference to art – or does art transcend disability? Selina Mills reports

The forgotten history of the Tube’s ‘poster girls’

4 November 2017 9:00 am

Lara Prendergast celebrates the ‘poster girls’, the little-known women artists who helped to emancipate the London Underground

‘Soviet Union Art Exhibition’, Zurich 1931, by Valentina Kulagina

How I fell under the spell of Soviet propaganda posters

28 October 2017 9:00 am

Fraser Nelson on how he – and so many others – fell under the spell of Soviet propaganda posters

Tyrone Singleton and Jenna Roberts in MacMillan’s Concerto

Kenneth MacMillan: the dark genius of British ballet – its destroyer, if you listen to some

21 October 2017 9:00 am

The 25th anniversary of Kenneth MacMillan’s death is finally giving us something to celebrate – and about time too, says Ismene Brown

‘Pastry Cook of Cagnes’, 1922, by Chaïm Soutine

The painter who devoted himself to turning kitchen-weary men into kings and popes

14 October 2017 9:00 am

Chaïm Soutine turned kitchen-weary men into monarchs and popes, says Laura Freeman

‘Logar Province’, 1984, by Steve McCurry

What's it like to have created the world's most famous photograph?

7 October 2017 9:00 am

The photographer Steve McCurry talks to Mary Wakefield about the ethics of making pain look pleasing

Divine comedy: even if Larry David is as big a prize twonk in real life as he is on Curb we can hardly begrudge him for it

The hilarity – and horror – of Curb Your Enthusiasm

30 September 2017 9:00 am

James Delingpole celebrates the unrivalled hilarity – and horror – of Curb Your Enthusiasm

iPhone 8 Plus, unveiled last week at the new Steve Jobs Theater at Apple Headquarters, Cupertino, California. The new features include a Retina HD display, A11 Bionic Chip and wireless charging

How the iPhone came to rule the world

23 September 2017 9:00 am

Rory Sutherland doesn’t have an iPhone. But he knows why you do

Tears of a clown: ‘Clowns hate Stephen King. They blame him for the “creepy clown” epidemic, which has led to multiple clown arrests’

The genius of Stephen King

16 September 2017 9:00 am

The genius of Stephen King, by his number one fan Tanya Gold

An out-of-work steel worker walking through Port Talbot, 1964

Welsh noir: How Port Talbot became the drama capital of Wales

9 September 2017 9:00 am

Why, as well as steel, does the Welsh town produce great actors? Jasper Rees reports