Arts feature

The earliest aerial drawing, made from a balloon basket, by Thomas Baldwin, 1785, left, and Apollo 8’s ‘Earthrise’, right, 50 years old

How the world was turned upside down by revelation of aerial perspectives

16 June 2018 9:00 am

Adam Begley explains how the world was turned upside down by the revelation of aerial perspectives

Musically, politically and culturally, Kanye West is a true original

9 June 2018 9:00 am

Musically, politically and culturally, Kanye West is a true original. Armond White explores the work of the hip-hop maverick

Remembrance of things past: interior of the Pantheon, Oxford Street, 18th century, by William Hodges, demolished in 1937

The buildings we knocked down in the name of ‘progress’

2 June 2018 9:00 am

Oxford Street once had a Pantheon to rival the one in Rome. Daisy Dunn goes in search of London’s forgotten buildings

Roger Allam as John Christie in David Hare’s The Moderate Soprano

A champion actor and fully paid-up member of the human race: Roger Allam interviewed

26 May 2018 9:00 am

On stage Roger Allam has covered pretty much everything in his four decades as an actor. Off it, he is a fully paid-up member of the human race, as Michael Henderson discovers

Garden of earthly delights: horticultural apprentice Emma Love in the newly reopened Temperate House at Kew

The real stars of Kew's newly restored Temperate House

19 May 2018 9:00 am

Kew’s newly restored Temperate House is undoubtedly awe-inspiring, says Isabel Hardman, but it’s the plants that are the real stars of the show

Dancing feat: Fred Astaire and Bing Crosby rehearsing choreography for Blue Skies

A short history of tap

12 May 2018 9:00 am

Tap dancing is having a moment. Louise Levene looks back at its golden age, its African American roots and how cultural appropriation was part of its life blood

Teetering chords and incestous sex: Francesca da Rimini at La Scala

How Riccardo Chailly brought joy – and Italian opera – back to La Scala

5 May 2018 9:00 am

Riccardo Chailly has brought joy – and Italian opera – back to La Scala. But will it last? Norman Lebrecht investigates

French Phidias: Auguste Rodin in his workshop in Meudon, c.1910

How Rodin made a Parthenon above Paris

28 April 2018 9:00 am

Rodin never set foot in Athens but he made a Parthenon above Paris, says Laura Freeman

From left to right: embroidered linen jacket, 1620s; pine marten fur hat, Caroline Reboux, 1895; man’s silk waistcoat embroidered in silk with a pattern of macaque monkeys, 1780–89

This V&A show, about fashion’s fascination with the natural world, will seduce and appal

21 April 2018 9:00 am

Melanie McDonagh is seduced and appalled by a show about fashion’s fascination with the natural world

Viv Albertine, left, at Alexandra Palace, 1980; and right, today

Viv Albertine of the Slits on anger, honesty and being an arsey feminist

14 April 2018 9:00 am

Viv Albertine, formerly of the Slits, is publishing her second book – and it’s full of the honesty and anger that have marked her life. Michael Hann takes the brunt

In 1985 it was ‘the most expensive building ever built’: HSBC’s Hong Kong headquarters designed by Norman Foster

From Stansted to corporate swank: superstructuralism has a lot to answer for

7 April 2018 9:00 am

Foster and Rogers wanted to save the planet – in fact, their high-tech architecture did the opposite, says Phineas Harper

Games without frontiers: Ian Cheng’s ‘Emissaries Guide – Narrative Agents and Wildlife’ (2017)

The artist who creates digital life forms that bite & self-harm. Sam Leith meets him (and them)

24 March 2018 9:00 am

The artist Ian Cheng creates digital life forms that bite and self-harm. Sam Leith meets him (and them)

Discomfort and joy: the director Ruben Ostlund, whose films are funny but subtly savage

The subtly savage world of filmmaker Ruben Ostlund

17 March 2018 9:00 am

Ruben Ostlund’s films scrape away the veneer of liberal civility to reveal our true animal nature. Jasper Rees meets him

Cherchez la femme: ‘Reclining Nude (Femme nue couchée)’, 1932, by Pablo Picasso

Peak Picasso: how the half-man half-monster reached his creative – and carnal – zenith

10 March 2018 9:00 am

James Woodall on Picasso at his creative – and carnal – zenith

The 1958 world première of Pinter’s The Birthday Party at the Lyric Hammersmith: John Stratton as McCann, John Slater as Goldberg and Richard Pearson as Stanley

The last survivor of The Birthday Party’s 1958 première remembers the traumatic first night

17 February 2018 9:00 am

Critics love The Birthday Party now. But that wasn’t always the case, says Jasper Rees

Are cruise liners the solution to the housing crisis?

10 February 2018 9:00 am

You won’t catch her on a cruise, but an exhibition at the V&A makes Daisy Dunn wistful for the golden age of travel

A right laugh: Geoff Norcott

What's it like being one of the only right-wing comics around?

3 February 2018 9:00 am

Lloyd Evans meets Geoff Norcott, Britain’s first ‘openly Conservative’ comedian

‘Anne Cresacre’, c.1527, by Hans Holbein the Younger

A sumptuous feast of an exhibition: Charles I at the Royal Academy reviewed

27 January 2018 9:00 am

Martin Gayford is overwhelmed by the sheer concentration of visual splendour amassed by Charles I

Conduct unbecoming: clockwise from top left, Leonard Bernstein, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Charles Dutoit and James Levine

The sex lives of conductors

20 January 2018 9:00 am

Norman Lebrecht on classical music’s dirty secret

Premier performance: Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill

Andrew Roberts’s guide to Churchill on screen

13 January 2018 9:00 am

Andrew Roberts on the challenges of playing Churchill

Claude Debussy and his daughter Chouchou near Arcachon, France, 1915

Debussy, Tippett and Wagner: the musical treats of 2018

6 January 2018 9:00 am

Richard Bratby on the musical treats in store over the year to come

There’s something about Mary: ‘Madonna of the Rosary’, 1539, by Lorenzo Lotto

The time has come for one of the most fascinating and idiosyncratic Renaissance artists

16 December 2017 9:00 am

Lorenzo Lotto was overlooked by 16th-century Venice, but now, says Martin Gayford, his time has come

Leslie Nielsen and Jeannette Charles in The Naked Gun

From good witch to female Alan Bennett: the Queen on the big screen

9 December 2017 9:00 am

Good witch, victim or female Alan Bennett? Tanya Gold on how Elizabeth II has been portrayed on screen

Monkey business: Jane Goodall

An exceptional new film about Jane Goodall unearths a remarkable love story

2 December 2017 9:00 am

Mary Wakefield talks to the director Brett Morgen, whose film about Jane Goodall tells a remarkable love story

‘A Cellar Dive in the Bend’, c.1895, by Richard Hoe Lawrence and Henry G. Piffard

A short history of flash photography

18 November 2017 9:00 am

A short history of flash photography, by Kate Flint