Exhibitions

‘I wish my boyfriend was as dirty as your policies’, 2011,by Coral Stoakes

Agitprop, love trucks and leaflet bombs: the art of protest

30 August 2014 9:00 am

Titles can be misleading, and in case you have visions of microwave ovens running amok or washing machines crunching up…

‘Futurist Motif’, 1920, by Gerardo Dottori

Futurism’s escape to the country

23 August 2014 9:00 am

Futurism, with its populist mix of explosive rhetoric (burn all the museums!) and resolutely urban experience and emphasis on speed,…

‘The Sutherland Cup’ by Angie Lewin

The perfect excuse to get out all the best Ravilious china

16 August 2014 9:00 am

A day trip to the Towner Art Gallery in Eastbourne is a summer pleasure, and two concurrent shows are proving…

‘Llyn Cau, Cader Idris’, 1765–67, by Richard Wilson

How Richard Wilson made Wales beautiful

16 August 2014 9:00 am

‘I recollect nothing so much as a solemn — bright — warm — fresh landscape by Wilson, which swims in…

‘Equivalents for the Megaliths’, 1935, by Paul Nash

A lost opportunity to show John Nash at his best

9 August 2014 9:00 am

John Northcote Nash (1893–1977) was the younger brother of Paul Nash (1889–1946), and has been long overshadowed by Paul, though…

‘Goose Woman’, c.1840, by George Smart

Why did it take so long to recognise the worth of British folk art?

2 August 2014 9:00 am

British folk art has been shamefully neglected in the land of its origin, as if the popular handiwork of past…

Malevich: Are Tate visitors ready for this master of modernism?

26 July 2014 9:00 am

Kazimir Malevich (1879–1935) is one of the founding fathers of Modernism, and as such entirely deserves the in-depth treatment with…

‘Paul Newman’, 1964, by Dennis Hopper

Had Hollywood not lured him away, Dennis Hopper could have made his name as a photographer

19 July 2014 9:00 am

In an age when photographs have swollen out of all proportion to their significance, and are mounted on wall-sized light…

‘Hawk Pouncing on Partridges’, c.1827, by John James Audubon

Painted, sculpted and stuffed: a history of the bird in art

12 July 2014 9:00 am

These days, as the sparrows and starlings so common in my youth are growing scarce, there’s less need for a…

‘After the Bath (Le repos après bain)’, 1897, by Edgar Degas, at Stephen Ongpin

Charles Hadcock – taking on the age of speculation with sculpture in the City

5 July 2014 9:00 am

As the boundary between auction house and art dealer blurs yet further, with auctioneers acting increasingly by private treaty as…

‘Tondo the Winged Hours of the Seabirds’ by Keith Grant

Oceans and forests in kaleidoscopic flow – discovering Keith Grant

28 June 2014 9:00 am

For decades I’ve been aware of the work of Keith Grant (born 1930), but it is only in recent years…

Diceman no. 5 by Pat Mills and Hunt Emerson

A comic drawn by Bob Monkhouse in which a superhero battles giant penises? Yes, it’s all here

28 June 2014 9:00 am

Fwoooosh! That, were someone to write a strip about it, would be the sound of a thousand comic books going…

Inspired and springing draughtsmanship: ‘Femme dans la nuit’, 18 April 1945, by Jean Miró

The painter who channelled the forces of gravity

21 June 2014 8:00 am

Tragically, Ian Welsh (1944–2014) did not live to see this exhibition of his latest work. Diagnosed with terminal cancer on…

‘Prince Pig’s Courtship’ by Paula Rego

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition offers up the good, the bad and the ugly – and a sore neck

14 June 2014 8:00 am

One of the great traditions of the RA’s Summer Exhibition has always been that each work submitted was seen in…

When Mondrian was off the grid

14 June 2014 8:00 am

I find it easy to forget that Piet Mondrian is a Dutch artist. The linear, gridlocked works he is famed…

Different stages of suffering: ‘Martyrs (Earth, Air, Fire, Water)’ , 2014, by Bill Viola

It took 11 years to bring Bill Viola to St Paul’s Cathedral – but it was worth it

7 June 2014 9:00 am

Deans are a strange breed. Growing up in the Church of England, I met a wide range, their cultural tastes…

‘Coventry Cathedral’, 1940, by John Piper

Kenneth Clark wasn’t happy simply popularising art, he liked to collect it and shape it too

7 June 2014 9:00 am

Earlier this year, I sat down and watched Kenneth Clark’s groundbreaking TV series Civilisation. I vaguely remember when it was…

‘Stranger III’, 1959, by Lynn Chadwick

Can Lynn Chadwick finally escape the 1950?

31 May 2014 9:00 am

Lynn Chadwick was born 100 years ago in London, and died in 2003 at his Gloucestershire home, Lypiatt Park, where…

‘Steps’, 1931, by Josef Albers

Josef Albers: roaring diagonals and paradisiacal squares

24 May 2014 9:00 am

Josef Albers (1888–1976) is best known for his long engagement with the square, which he painted in exquisite variation more…

‘Diana and Actaeon’, 1556–59, by Titian

We’re very lucky Philip II was so indulgent with Titian

24 May 2014 9:00 am

In Venice, around 1552, Titian began work on a series of six paintings for King Philip II of Spain, each…

‘Portrait of a Bishop’, c.1541–2, by Jacopo Carrucci, known as Pontormo

The brilliant neurotics of the late Renaissance

17 May 2014 9:00 am

In many respects the average art-lover remains a Victorian, and the Florentine Renaissance is one area in which that is…

‘Capel-y-ffin’, 1926–27, by David Jones

What was Allen Ginsberg doing in Wales? LSD

17 May 2014 9:00 am

‘Valleys breathe, heaven and earth move together,/ daisies push inches of yellow air, vegetables tremble,/ grass shimmers green…’ The characteristic…

‘Brigitte Bardot in Spoleto’, 1961, by Marcello Geppetti

When Raquel Welch danced on a table at Cinecittà

17 May 2014 9:00 am

Before there was Hello!, OK! and Closer, there was Oggi. Oggi was the magazine my Italian mother used to flick…

‘Composition With Fish’ by Jankel Adler, on show at Goldmark Gallery

The hidden, overlooked and undervalued: Andrew Lambirth’s spring roundup

10 May 2014 9:00 am

Jankel Adler (1895–1949), a Polish Jew who arrived in Glasgow in 1941, was invalided out of the Polish army, and…

‘The Tea Table’, 1938, by Henri Le Sidaner

Henri Le Sidaner: the artist who fell between two schools

10 May 2014 9:00 am

Like other species, artists club together in movements not just for purposes of identification but for longevity. Individuals who don’t…