Exhibitions

‘Tondo the Winged Hours of the Seabirds’ by Keith Grant

Oceans and forests in kaleidoscopic flow – discovering Keith Grant

28 June 2014 9:00 am

For decades I’ve been aware of the work of Keith Grant (born 1930), but it is only in recent years…

Diceman no. 5 by Pat Mills and Hunt Emerson

A comic drawn by Bob Monkhouse in which a superhero battles giant penises? Yes, it’s all here

28 June 2014 9:00 am

Fwoooosh! That, were someone to write a strip about it, would be the sound of a thousand comic books going…

Inspired and springing draughtsmanship: ‘Femme dans la nuit’, 18 April 1945, by Jean Miró

The painter who channelled the forces of gravity

21 June 2014 8:00 am

Tragically, Ian Welsh (1944–2014) did not live to see this exhibition of his latest work. Diagnosed with terminal cancer on…

‘Prince Pig’s Courtship’ by Paula Rego

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition offers up the good, the bad and the ugly – and a sore neck

14 June 2014 8:00 am

One of the great traditions of the RA’s Summer Exhibition has always been that each work submitted was seen in…

When Mondrian was off the grid

14 June 2014 8:00 am

I find it easy to forget that Piet Mondrian is a Dutch artist. The linear, gridlocked works he is famed…

Different stages of suffering: ‘Martyrs (Earth, Air, Fire, Water)’ , 2014, by Bill Viola

It took 11 years to bring Bill Viola to St Paul’s Cathedral – but it was worth it

7 June 2014 9:00 am

Deans are a strange breed. Growing up in the Church of England, I met a wide range, their cultural tastes…

‘Coventry Cathedral’, 1940, by John Piper

Kenneth Clark wasn’t happy simply popularising art, he liked to collect it and shape it too

7 June 2014 9:00 am

Earlier this year, I sat down and watched Kenneth Clark’s groundbreaking TV series Civilisation. I vaguely remember when it was…

‘Stranger III’, 1959, by Lynn Chadwick

Can Lynn Chadwick finally escape the 1950?

31 May 2014 9:00 am

Lynn Chadwick was born 100 years ago in London, and died in 2003 at his Gloucestershire home, Lypiatt Park, where…

‘Steps’, 1931, by Josef Albers

Josef Albers: roaring diagonals and paradisiacal squares

24 May 2014 9:00 am

Josef Albers (1888–1976) is best known for his long engagement with the square, which he painted in exquisite variation more…

‘Diana and Actaeon’, 1556–59, by Titian

We’re very lucky Philip II was so indulgent with Titian

24 May 2014 9:00 am

In Venice, around 1552, Titian began work on a series of six paintings for King Philip II of Spain, each…

‘Portrait of a Bishop’, c.1541–2, by Jacopo Carrucci, known as Pontormo

The brilliant neurotics of the late Renaissance

17 May 2014 9:00 am

In many respects the average art-lover remains a Victorian, and the Florentine Renaissance is one area in which that is…

‘Capel-y-ffin’, 1926–27, by David Jones

What was Allen Ginsberg doing in Wales? LSD

17 May 2014 9:00 am

‘Valleys breathe, heaven and earth move together,/ daisies push inches of yellow air, vegetables tremble,/ grass shimmers green…’ The characteristic…

‘Brigitte Bardot in Spoleto’, 1961, by Marcello Geppetti

When Raquel Welch danced on a table at Cinecittà

17 May 2014 9:00 am

Before there was Hello!, OK! and Closer, there was Oggi. Oggi was the magazine my Italian mother used to flick…

‘Composition With Fish’ by Jankel Adler, on show at Goldmark Gallery

The hidden, overlooked and undervalued: Andrew Lambirth’s spring roundup

10 May 2014 9:00 am

Jankel Adler (1895–1949), a Polish Jew who arrived in Glasgow in 1941, was invalided out of the Polish army, and…

‘The Tea Table’, 1938, by Henri Le Sidaner

Henri Le Sidaner: the artist who fell between two schools

10 May 2014 9:00 am

Like other species, artists club together in movements not just for purposes of identification but for longevity. Individuals who don’t…

‘Herring Fisher’s Goodbye’, 1928, by Christopher Wood

A fresh perspective on reassuringly familiar artists

3 May 2014 9:00 am

This exhibition examines a loosely knit community of artists and their interaction over a decade at the beginning of the…

The German devotion to high culture is quite shaming

26 April 2014 9:00 am

The 300th anniversary of George I coming to the British throne on 1 August 1714 is big news in his…

‘Icarus’, 1943, by Henri Matisse, maquette for plate VIII of ‘Jazz’, 1947

The Matisse Cut-Outs is a show of true magnificence

26 April 2014 9:00 am

Artists who live long enough to enjoy a late period of working will often produce art that is radically different…

Design by William Kent for a cascade at Chatsworth, c.1735–40; below, the Bute epergne, 1756, by Thomas Heming, designed by Kent

William Kent was an ideas man - the Damien Hirst of the 18th century

12 April 2014 9:00 am

How important is William Kent (1685–1748)? He’s not exactly a household name and yet this English painter and architect, apprenticed…

Mysteriously ravishing: ‘Santo Spirito’, 2013, by Arturo Di Stefano

It’s the whisper you’ve got to listen for in Arturo Di Stefano’s paintings

5 April 2014 9:00 am

One of the paintings in Arturo Di Stefano’s impressive new show at Purdy Hicks Gallery is called ‘Santa Croce’ and…

Passive and bound: ‘Agnus Dei’, c.1635–40, by Zurbarán

Francisco de Zurbarán had a Hollywood sense of drama

5 April 2014 9:00 am

It seems suitable that just round the corner from the Zurbarán exhibition at the Palais des Beaux Arts is the…

The great and the good and the gassed and the dead

29 March 2014 9:00 am

Last week, three exhibitions celebrating the art of Germany; this week, a show commemorating the first world war fought against…

‘Overhang’ by Julian Cooper

Julian Cooper's rock profiles

29 March 2014 9:00 am

Like most ambitious artists, Julian Cooper has been pulled this way and that by seemingly conflicting influences. The son and…

‘Hercules Killing Cacus’, 1588, by Hendrik Goltzius

Upside down and right on top: the power of George Baselitz

22 March 2014 9:00 am

It’s German Season in London, and revealingly the best of three new shows is the one dealing with the most…

Fernand Léger ‘s ‘The City’, 1919

The tubular joys of Fernand Léger

22 March 2014 9:00 am

In 1914 Fernand Léger gave a lecture about modern art. By then recognised as a leading Cubist artist, he had…