Book review – military history

Stretcher-parties wading through the morass sometimes took six hours to bring in casualties. Left: near Boesinghe, 1 August 1917 (from Chris McNabb’s Passchendaele 1917)

Did the hideous carnage of Passchendaele gain the Allies anything?

29 July 2017 9:00 am

Peter Parker on the carnage of Passchendaele

A Special Air Service jeep patrol is greeted by its commander David Stirling on its return from the desert in January 1943

Stirling work with the SAS

8 October 2016 9:00 am

The SAS was the first unit to be granted regimental status for generations. Its chief aim was to damage the…

Was the bloodiest battle in history completely futile?

2 July 2016 9:00 am

On 1 July 1916, along a frontage of 18 miles, 100,000 British infantrymen — considerably more than the entire strength…

Pumped up and dangerous: going to war on drugs

21 May 2016 9:00 am

‘Of all civilisation’s occupational categories, that of soldier may be the most conducive to regular drug use.’ The problem with…

British troops go over the top on 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme

The British army’s greatest catastrophe — and its most valuable lesson

5 September 2015 9:00 am

Peter Parker spends 24 hours on the bloodsoaked battlefield of the Somme, scene of the British army’s greatest catastrophe

What’s wrong with the Victoria Cross

6 June 2015 9:00 am

‘It is the task of a Patton or a Napoleon to persuade soldiers that bits of ribbon are intrinsically valuable.…

I guarded Rudolf Hess

15 November 2014 9:00 am

I had the misfortune to meet Lord Richards on probably the darkest day of his 42 years in the military.…

‘There was no better way’: Ancient Celts or Gauls go into battle against the massed ranks of Rome, and are slaughtered for the good of posterity

War is good for us

5 April 2014 9:00 am

The argument that mankind’s innate violence can only be contained by force of arms may make for a neat paradox, but it fails to convince David Crane