Byron

A soldier’s widow and child in Greece c. 1950

Greece is not just for Greeks — it belongs to the world

6 April 2019 9:00 am

It often proves difficult to talk about modern Greece. Not just because of the relentless stream of news coming at…

With the all-encompassing model of Moby-Dick behind him, Hoare presents us with a vast and billowing medley of marinaria

Whales, waves and ancient mariners make for a vast, billowing sea medley

29 July 2017 9:00 am

‘The sea defines us, connects us, separates us,’ Philip Hoare has written. His prize-winning Leviathan, then a collection of essays…

Hurstbourne Park, the Earl of Portsmouth’s family home in Hampshire, provided the only protection and stability in his life

The fascinating, disturbing tale of the mad Earl of Portsmouth

8 October 2016 9:00 am

The 55-year-old ’flu-ridden John Charles Wallop, 3rd Earl of Portsmouth, his feet in a basin of warm water, shivered in…

The city’s beauty has often been described as ‘melancholic’, ‘sinister’ or ‘dreamlike’

‘The finest architectural delusion in the world’

14 May 2016 9:00 am

It took the madness of genius to build such a wonderful impossibility. Patrick Marnham reviews a delightful new literary guide to Venice

Mussolini wanted it straightened

Beyond the Leaning Tower: the wonders of Pisa

12 December 2015 9:00 am

Say ‘Pisa’ and everyone thinks of the Leaning Tower. Fair enough; it’s a curiosity, and the tourist board must be…

‘Some find their death by swords and bullets; and some by fluids down the gullet’. Thomas Rowlandson’s illustration of ‘The English Dance of Death’ by William Combe, 1815 — a satire on the evils of drinking gin

Enjoy gin but don’t read books? Or read them only while drinking gin? This is the book for you

6 September 2014 9:00 am

Gin Glorious Gin: How Mother’s Ruin Became the Spirit of London is a jaunty and diverting history of ‘a wonderful…

Taki: the wisdom of 12-year-olds

7 December 2013 9:00 am

 New York I’m in an extremely happy state as I write this because a young Englishman flew over the ocean…

The cover of a popular late-19th-century edition of Mary Shelley’s novel. Frankenstein confronts the monster he has created

How the Romantics ruined lives

16 November 2013 9:00 am

It is perhaps the most celebrated house-party in the history of literary tittle-tattle: a two-house-party to be precise. Byron and…

A nation of meddlers

11 June 2011 12:00 am

David Pryce-Jones protests too much about a motley collection of British idealists who became infatuated by foreign causes, says Sam Leith