Paris

Paul Rosenberg with a Matisse painting in the 1930s

Picasso’s dealer

4 October 2014 9:00 am

When she was four, Anne Sinclair had her portrait painted by Marie Laurencin. It is a charming picture, a little…

The camera always lies

27 September 2014 9:00 am

Stephen Bayley explores how the camera shapes our relationship with architecture

‘Moonrise and Pale Dancer’ by Derek Hyatt

The man who brought Cubism to New York

20 September 2014 9:00 am

The American Jewish artist Max Weber (1881–1961) was born in Belostok in Russia (now Bialystok in Poland), and although he…

The Russian literary celebrity who begged Tolstoy to spare Prince Andrei

19 July 2014 9:00 am

Nadezhda Alexandrovna Lokhvitskaya was a literary celebrity in pre-revolutionary St Petersburg. She chose the pen-name ‘Teffi’ because it was androgynous,…

Portrait of Jeanne Duval by Edouard Manet

The breasts that launched Les Fleurs du Mal

21 June 2014 8:00 am

This novel is based on the life of Charles Baudelaire and the relationship he enjoyed — or endured — with…

Robert Harris’s diary: My accidental war with Tony Blair

14 June 2014 8:00 am

To Paris, for the launch of the French edition of my novel about the Dreyfus affair. As we land, I…

Edward VII, portrayed in the French press hurrying across the Channel to the delights of Paris

The Paris of Napoleon III was one big brothel – which is why the future Edward VII loved it

7 June 2014 9:00 am

Stephen Clarke lives in Paris and writes book with titles such as 1,000 Years of Annoying the French. Dirty Bertie…

Recent crime fiction

26 April 2014 9:00 am

Louise Welsh rarely repeats herself, a quality to celebrate in a crime novelist. Her latest novel, A Lovely Way to…

From Göring to Hemingway, via Coco Chanel – the dark glamour of the Paris Ritz at war

19 April 2014 9:00 am

In Midnight in Paris, Woody Allen did a good job of showing how foolish it is to be obsessed by…

Gay Paree: food, feuds and phalluses – I mean, fallacies

15 March 2014 9:00 am

In his preface to The Joy of Gay Sex (revised and expanded third edition), Edmund White praises the ‘kinkier’ aspects…

First novels: When romance develops from an old photograph

22 February 2014 9:00 am

The intensely lyrical Ghost Moth is set in Belfast in 1969, as the Troubles begin and when Katherine, housewife and…

Marble portrait of Augustus, c.40 BC

What Emperor Augustus left us

15 February 2014 9:00 am

Roderick Conway Morris on the influence and legacy of Augustus

Blonde, beautiful — and desperate to survive in Nazi France

16 November 2013 9:00 am

Around 200 Englishwomen lived through the German Occupation of Paris. Nicholas Shakespeare’s aunt Priscilla was one. Men in the street…

‘Guitare et verre’, 1917, by Georges Braque

Braque in full flight

26 October 2013 9:00 am

Towards the end of his life, Georges Braque described his vision in the following terms: ‘No object can be tied…

Dreaming in the Renaissance

19 October 2013 9:00 am

The exhibition The Renaissance and Dream at the Musée du Luxembourg in Paris (until 26 January 2014) explores how artists…

Colette’s France, by Jane Gilmour - review

28 September 2013 9:00 am

Richard Davenport-Hines on the charmed, dizzy world of the multi-talented Colette

Jeff Koons's work is childish — just like us

28 September 2013 9:00 am

The contrast could not have been more acute. It came the day after a press release from Christie’s New York…

The figure of the flâneur, captured by Degas in ‘Place de la Concorde’, had its origin in Mr Spectator

Tales of Two Cities, by Jonathan Conlin - review

15 June 2013 9:00 am

In Jonathan Conlin’s Tales of Two Cities the little acknowledged but hugely significant histoire croisée of two rival metropoles gets…

The Garden of Eros, by John Calder - review

1 June 2013 9:00 am

John Calder is Britain’s most distinguished living publisher, and at the age of 86 he’s still at it. He first…

Is the Louvre suggesting that Germany is programmed for war and catastrophe?

18 May 2013 9:00 am

Curated by the Louvre as a tribute to mark the 50th anniversary of the Franco–German co-operation treaty signed in January…

The armoured cars of Leclerc’s division arrive at the Rue Guynemer on 25 August

Eleven Days in August, by Matthew Cobb - review

4 May 2013 9:00 am

It is fair to assume that Professor Matthew Cobb has often been asked if he is related to Professor Richard…

The original special relationship

3 December 2011 11:00 am

Of all the cities in all the world, Paris dominates the American imagination more than any other. Although Americans may…

Chagrin d’amour

19 November 2011 10:00 am

The horror of love: Nancy Mitford’s first fiancé was gay; her husband, Peter Rodd, was feckless, spendthrift and unsympathetic, and…

Hall of mirrors

4 June 2011 12:00 am

After the Nazi occupation of Paris was over, Sartre famously said — somewhat hypocritically, given his own slippery behaviour — that the only possibilities had been collaboration or resistance.

Very drôle

28 May 2011 12:00 am

It’s nice to know that the trees lining the roads in Paris have microchips embedded in their trunks, that the city council is controlling the pigeon population by shaking the eggs to make them infertile and that the Café Voisin served elephant consommé during the 1870 siege.