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Six of the worst bits from Jeremy Corbyn’s Andrew Neil interview

Six of the worst bits from Jeremy Corbyn's Andrew Neil interview
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Jeremy Corbyn's interview with Andrew Neil is likely to be a defining moment in the Labour leader's election campaign. Corbyn struggled to spell out his position on Brexit, refused to apologise over allegations of anti-Semitism and also failed to do his homework when it came to saying how his government would fund its multi-billion pound plans to revolutionise Britain. It's a hard choice but here are the six worst bits from Corbyn's clash with Andrew Neil:

Corbyn refuses to apologise over anti-Semitism:

The Labour leader was pressed repeatedly to apologise over accusations of anti-Semitism. Four times, he refused to do so:

Corbyn: chief rabbi is wrong

The chief rabbi said it was a 'mendacious fiction' that Labour had thoroughly investigated anti-Semitism within its ranks. Not so, said Corbyn:

Corbyn challenged on Brexit

When it came to Brexit, things didn't get much better for Corbyn. The Labour leader was repeatedly asked to explain his 'neutral' stance on the issue of the day. It's fair to say he failed to convince:

Would Corbyn give the order to capture Isis's leader?

Jeremy Corbyn is prime minister. The next leader of Isis is surrounded by British special forces. 'We can get him. Would you give the order?'

The first duty of the prime minister is to keep this country’s people safe; @jeremycorbyn would not. Given the choice, he always looks to blame Britain and her allies instead of those who wish to do us harm #GE2019 #andrewneilinterviews @afneil pic.twitter.com/pcrFzXcdfx

— David Jack (@DJack_Journo) November 26, 2019

Labour's crumbling tax base

The top one per cent are the voters Labour will go after if Jeremy Corbyn becomes Prime Minister. But what happens if they decide to up sticks? Corbyn wasn't sure:

Corbyn's 'Waspi' muddle

Jeremy Corbyn has vowed to compensate the ‘Waspi’ women who feel they have been ill-treated by having their retirement age raised from 60 to 65. That will cost £60bn. So how will Labour pay for it?

Boris Johnson is set to face Andrew Neil soon. Mr S hopes the PM is doing his homework....

Written bySteerpike

Steerpike is The Spectator's gossip columnist, serving up the latest tittle tattle from London and beyond. Email tips to steerpike@spectator.co.uk.

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