Architecture

The obelisk in the Place de la Concorde. Its transport from Luxor to Paris took seven years and involved the destruction of an entire village

Are Egypt’s obelisks more stunning even than the pyramids?

23 April 2016 9:00 am

On the banks of the River Thames in central London, an ancient Egyptian obelisk, known as Cleopatra’s Needle, reaches towards…

The aftermath following airstrikes in Syria (Photo: Getty)

Further dispatches from Syria’s maelstrom

16 April 2016 9:00 am

The mechanic, blinded in one eye by shrapnel, spent three days searching for his family in the destroyed buildings and…

Is this LA?: Dilapidated deco in Downtown

The heart of Los Angeles feels like somewhere else entirely

9 April 2016 9:00 am

There’s a certain kind of Englishman who falls hard for Los Angeles. Men such as Graham Nash, who swapped the…

Victoria Station, Mumbai

Flying from Donald Trump to the beautiful ruins of another empire

5 March 2016 9:00 am

Just as the presidential race in America started to get really crazy, I left for India. On the morning of…

Left: The main gate to the mighty citadel has withstood centuries of invasion. Now much scarred, it presides over a bombed-out city, including the wrecked medieval souq (above), until recently the world’s largest and most vibrant covered historic market and Unesco world heritage site

Syria's Stalingrad: how Aleppo slipped from tolerance to terrorism

5 March 2016 9:00 am

Justin Marozzi on the bitter irony of Aleppo’s ancient motto

Brute force: St Peter’s internal elevation

The embarrassing story of Scotland’s most important 20th century structure

27 February 2016 9:00 am

Finding St Peter’s is not straightforward. I approach the wrong way, driving up a pot-holed farm track between a golf…

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The Heckler: why we must stop Thomas Heatherwick's Garden Bridge

21 November 2015 9:00 am

Thomas Heatherwick is the most famous designer in the United Kingdom today and has an unquestionable flair for attention-grabbing creations.…

Hot seats: Charles and Ray Eames posing with chair bases

The couple behind the world’s most famous chair

29 October 2015 9:00 am

Peter Mandelson, in his moment of pomp, had his portrait taken by Lord Snowdon. He is sitting on a fine…

The clock towers bigger than Big Ben

24 October 2015 9:00 am

Bigger Bens Big Ben will have a £29m refurbishment. Who has the biggest clock tower? Kremlin Clock: Installed on the…

1972: Park Hill Estate, Sheffield. Photo: Fox Photos/Getty Images

A crushing case for brutalism — with the people left out

10 October 2015 9:00 am

Elain Harwood’s flawed but impressive study of modernist architecture manages perfectly to reflect its subject, says David Kynaston

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Edmund de Waal’s diary: Selling nothing, and why writers need ping-pong

10 October 2015 9:00 am

On the top landing of the Royal Academy is the Sackler Sculpture Corridor, a long stony shelf of torsos of…

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The surreal beauty of Soviet bus stops

12 September 2015 9:00 am

The Soviet Union was a nation of bus stops. Cars were hard to come by, so a vast public transport…

The master builder: Palladio’s villas in the Veneto, Italy — Villa Caldogno

Palladio was the greatest influence on taste ever – but his time is finally up

29 August 2015 9:00 am

Palladio gave his name to a style that spread around the world. But was it too successful for its own good, wonders Stephen Bayley

Antigua: pastel houses and striking views

Escape Antigua’s tourists (but be ready to confront some grim secrets)

22 August 2015 9:00 am

‘Tourism, tourism and tourism,’ said my Antiguan cab driver, when I asked what the country’s main industries were. Still, it’s…

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The Heckler: architecture would be better off without Zaha Hadid

8 August 2015 9:00 am

Zaha Hadid is the most famous woman architect in the world. Would women or, indeed, architecture, be better off without…

An adventure playground in 1966. Photo: William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images

The new adventures of the adventure playground

25 July 2015 9:00 am

Are adventure playgrounds set to make a comeback, asks Maisie Rowe

Detroit: a city brought back from the dead

The moral case for gentrification

27 June 2015 9:00 am

To gentrify or not to gentrify. That is the question, says Stephen Bayley

On the cusp: a cliche with a hidden astrological side

27 June 2015 9:00 am

‘A stalker who dressed a pillow “mannequin” in his ex’s nurse’s uniform, then sent her a picture, has been told…

A Frank Gehry building at Paddy McKillen’s architectural theme park in Provence

Bored of collecting art? Try architecture

13 June 2015 9:00 am

The finest art has become so pricy that smart multi-millionaires are moving on to architecture

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Fenchurch in the Sky Garden – like going for dinner in Total Recall

30 May 2015 9:00 am

Fenchurch is a restaurant that is scared of terrorists. It cowers at the top of 20 Fenchurch Street, a skyscraper…

Arch enemies: Euston Arch (left), torn down to make way for London’s most miserable train station (right)

Should Euston Arch be raised from the dead?

23 May 2015 9:00 am

Yes  William Cook Rejoice! Rejoice! Fifty-four years after its destruction, Euston Arch has returned to Euston. Well, after a fashion.…

Chichu Art Museum, Naoshima. Photo: Fujitsuka Mitsumasa

Welcome to Japan’s best kept cultural secret: an art island with an underground museum

23 May 2015 9:00 am

In his introductory remarks to the Afro–Eurasian Eclipse, one of his later suites for jazz orchestra, Duke Ellington remarked —…

Much compared to a photocopier: Renzo Piano’s new Whitney Museum

Renzo Piano’s new Whitney Museum is very good news - for the Met

23 May 2015 9:00 am

About six years ago the first section of the now celebrated High Line was opened in New York and made…

Scapegoat for all of urban life’s ills: Le Corbusier, c.1950

How dedicated a fascist was Le Corbusier?

23 May 2015 9:00 am

The ‘revelations’, 50 years after he drowned, that Le Corbusier was a ‘fascist’ and an anti-Semite are neither fresh nor…

Crazy horses: Andy Scott’s Kelpies at sunset

The Spectator declares war on bad public art

28 February 2015 9:00 am

Stephen Bayley announces the launch of What’s That Thing?, The Spectator’s award for bad public art