Nicholas Farrell Nicholas Farrell

Anis Amri’s unchecked passage across Europe is nothing short of a scandal

That the Tunisian terrorist who slaughtered 12 people in Berlin on Monday was even in Europe, let alone able to move about Europe with ease, is a scandal. It shows that the policy of the European Union and its member nations on the migrant crisis is a complete and dangerous failure. The collective refusal of the European liberal elite to face up to this fact promises further disaster.

Anis Amri, 24, had no legal let alone moral right to be in Europe, and yet he had been here since 2011 when he arrived in a migrant boat on the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa. Shortly afterwards, he was jailed for four years after he set fire to a migrant welcome centre in Sicily. On his release in 2015, he was ordered by Italian authorities to return home. Instead, he was able somehow to move on to Germany.

Even this week, once Amri had become the most wanted man in Europe, he was able to travel back from Berlin – it is still unclear how, or by which route – to Chambery in France, according to police (despite France being a country supposedly in a state of emergency) and from there by train to Turin in Italy; and then to Sesto San Giovanni, on the outskirts of Milan. There, by chance, two policemen in a patrol car saw him walking down the street outside the station in the early hours of the morning, and stopped him to carry out a routine check. So he took a pistol out of his rucksack, shouted ‘Allahu Akbah!’ and opened fire, wounding one of the policeman in the shoulder. The other policeman then shot him dead. Forensic tests later identified him from his fingerprints.

This year, 180,000 migrants have arrived in Italy by sea, which is a new

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