Fraser Nelson

Both sides of the divide

Both sides of the divide
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Sky has again given the BBC a lesson in how to produce documentaries. Ross Kemp in Israel last night was superb: not just grippingly produced, but actually balanced.

Yesterday’s episode opened with Kemp on a tour with an Israeli taxi driver, who talks about the Palestinian terror attacks, the effects it has on his community and not least to him (they killed his 17-year-old daughter). Then to a man who lives 300 yards from the Gaza border who lost his 22-year-old daughter to a Hamas rocket – but who wants forgiveness, and a two-state solution.

The issue of illegal Israeli settlements was brilliantly covered. The tension between secular and ultra-orthodox Jews was conveyed: Kemp pointed out that they are “not popular with the Israeli majority” – just part of why the story is far more complicated than wicked Israelis versus wronged Palestinians. There are extremists in both factions. And there are Palestinians and Israelis who long for peace with each other.

Kemp presented one of the best, most insightful and balanced piece of television I have seen explaining Israel’s unique situation. The BBC could have done the Gaza half of his story (on YouTube now), but the Israel side is something you’d be lucky to see on Auntie.

Written byFraser Nelson

Fraser Nelson is the editor of The Spectator. He is also a columnist with The Daily Telegraph, a member of the advisory board of the Centre for Social Justice and the Centre for Policy Studies.

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