The Spectator

Election barometer: the debacle in figures

Election barometer: the debacle in figures
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How the seats have changed:

And how did the pollsters do? There will have been champagne corks popping at Survation last night – and sorrows being drowned at BMG and ICM:

Labour recorded their biggest increase in the share of the vote since 1945:

Turnout was up, with a widespread belief that young voters turned out en masse. But actually, turnout was the 5th lowest of any general election since 1945:

Highest turnouts

1950

83.9%

1951

82.9%

February 1974

78.8%

1959

78.7%

1992

77.7%

Lowest turnouts

2001

59.4%

2005

61.4%

2010

65.1%

2015

66.1%

2017

68.7%

In spite of failing to secure a majority Theresa May won a higher share of the vote than any party since 1945 and higher than a Conservative government since Mrs Thatcher’s landslide in 1983

Year

Con vote share

Lab vote share

2017

42.4%

40.0%

2015

36.9%

30.4%

2005

32.4%

35.2%

2001

31.7%

40.7%

1997

30.7%

43.2%

1992

41.9%

34.4%

1987

42.2%

30.8%

1983

42.4%

27.6%

Bluffers have been vindicated: the two-party system is back:

Which parties got the best and which get the worse deal out of the electoral system?

Votes received for every seat won

SNP

27,930

Conservative

42,927

Labour

49,266

Lib Dem

197,254

Green

524,604

Ukip notched up 593,852 votes but won no seats

What about the popular vote of the parties who didn’t make it into the TV debates?

Yorkshire Party

20,958

National Health Action

16,119

Christian People’s Alliance

5,869

British National Party

4,642

Women's Equality Party

3,580

Monster Raving Loony Party

3,890

Pirate Party

2,321

English Democrats

1,913

Workers’ Revolutionary Party

771

Social Democratic Party

469