James Forsyth

Is the force with Obama?

Is the force with Obama?
Text settings
Comments

The difference in enthusiasm and size of crowds between the Barack Obama and Mitt Romney rallies was stark.  Obama was clearly exhausted at his eve of caucus rally in Des Moines, is voice was hoarse and many of his best lines were barely audible but still his crowd was far larger and more enthusiastic than Romney’s. Those who have been covering the campaign out here for months say that the enthusiasm gap between Republicans and Democrats in a state that George W. Bush carried in 2004 is remarkable. Even the non-front-running Democrats regularly draw bigger crowds than the leading Republicans. 

Obama’s delivery tonight was not exceptional but the 2,100 crowd at a localDes Moines high school was enthusiastic and was determined to pull him through.  When Obama finished his speech, they rose to their feet as one. 

The speech was light on policy but heavy on hope, telling the young crowd “this is our moment” and that change can happen “if you believe”.  He ran through American history explaining why hope was what had driven change from the revolution to the civil rights movement; Obama’s race makes the passage far more potent than it otherwise would be.

If body language is anything to go by, the Obama campaign—candidate and aides alike—feel very good about their chances. Certainly, the fact that the Obama team’s last rally drew twice as many people as Clinton’s event in the same town has to be seen as encouraging for them.

Written byJames Forsyth

James Forsyth is Political Editor of the Spectator. He is also a columnist in The Sun.

Comments
Topics in this articleSociety