Michael Taube

Is the game up for Justin Trudeau?

(Photo: Getty)

In the dog days of summer, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government are skating on thin ice once more. 

An August 18-23 national survey by Abacus Data of 2,189 adults revealed that 56 per cent of respondents believed he ‘should step down’ rather than run again for re-election. Only 27 per cent felt he should stay, and 17 per cent were unsure. 

The Canadian public is clearly tired of his ineffective, mediocre leadership and want him to return to private life

This number is in line with recent polling data in Canada. Pierre Poilievre and the opposition Conservatives have led in almost every opinion poll conducted since he became party leader on September 10, 2022. Moreover, the federal government has largely slipped into the 26-29 per cent range in national popularity – and, in several cases, is behind by either close to or above double digits. In the most recent example, the Conservatives lead the Liberals by 38-26 per cent in an August 23 poll by Abacus Data. 

For Trudeau, who has led the Liberals since 2013 and been PM since 2015, this is a real kick in the political backside. The Canadian public is clearly tired of his ineffective, mediocre leadership and want him to return to private life.

In fairness, this isn’t the first time that Trudeau has teetered on the brink of political disaster. He’s survived a multitude of political pitfalls, hurdles, mistakes, mishaps and scandals the past eight years. This includes three older instances of blackface, two ethics violations, public spats with some female MPs and ministers and spending taxpayer dollars like a drunken sailor.

Was it skill, or the luck of fools, that enabled him to survive this long? His political spin doctors obviously helped him to some degree.

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