Fraser Nelson

Journalists didn’t kill Kids Company. Camila Batmanghelidjh did

Journalists didn’t kill Kids Company. Camila Batmanghelidjh did
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To listen to Camila Batmanghelidjh on the Radio 4 this morning, you’d think that her upstanding charity had been mysteriously assassinated by a vicious media – and by nothing else. This sounded like a very different Camila Batmanghelidjh to the one who telephoned me after The Spectator first blew the whistle on the irregularities at Kids Company – she was apoplectic. Didn’t I know that journalists normally love Kids Company?

Kids Company has now collapsed – and not because journalists had (finally) been allowed to start asking questions. It has collapsed because Camila Batmanghelidjh ran up financial costs that she was not able to cover. She ran the charity, the responsibility was hers – it’s odd to hear her suggest otherwise. Yes, she created something amazing that did a lot of good for a lot of people. I have huge admiration for her, and what she achieved. There will be hundreds, if not thousands of disadvantaged young people whose lives will be permanently better for what she and her colleagues were able to do for them.

But there is no getting away from a simple fact: the kids she did so much for have now been left in the lurch because of her own tragic mismanagement.

Written byFraser Nelson

Fraser Nelson is the editor of The Spectator. He is also a columnist with The Daily Telegraph, a member of the advisory board of the Centre for Social Justice and the Centre for Policy Studies.

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