Douglas Murray

Remembering Roger Scruton

Remembering Roger Scruton
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As readers of The Spectator know, Sir Roger Scruton died in January this year at the age of 75. Before his death, he agreed to the setting up of an institution that would bear his name and seek to continue his legacy. The Roger Scruton Legacy Foundation is that institution and it has now launched. As the foundation puts it, ‘The mission of the Roger Scruton Legacy Foundation is to establish the legacy of Sir Roger Scruton through supporting the conservation, care, and continuation of humane wisdom and culture from the Western tradition.’

Lady Scruton sits on the RSLF’s board. Many of Scruton’s numerous friends and former colleagues are also involved and I am honoured to be among the members of the advisory board. Since Roger’s death, a large number of people have asked what they might do to keep his memory and ideas alive. Being involved in the RSLF is one very practical such thing and I would urge people to sign up and join in. 

Of course, this is a tricky time for any organisation to launch, since launch events must remain virtual. As ever one might wish for different circumstances. Nevertheless, on Wednesday of this week, the foundation will have its inaugural event, and it is one I am enormously looking forward to.

For the occasion, I will be in conversation with Roger Kimball, the distinguished American writer, essayist, editor of the New Criterion and long-time friend of Scruton. For this online event, we will be talking about Roger Scruton’s life and legacy. You can join us by signing up here.

I hope to see as many of you as possible there on Wednesday. And look forward to joining Scruton’s friends, family, readers, associates, colleagues and a new generation of followers as we launch the Roger Scruton Legacy Foundation.

Written byDouglas Murray

Douglas Murray is associate editor of The Spectator and author of The Madness of Crowds: Gender, Race and Identity, among other books.

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