Fraser Nelson

The cost of drugs

The cost of drugs
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To clarify my earlier blog, I certainly did not mean the murdered prostitutes in Suffolk were “victims” of the government’s failed war on drugs. They were born free and chose drugs. My point is how much cheaper and easier it has become in the last ten years to take such a choice. The point of prohibition is to make heroin unaffordable, or very difficult to get hold of. Of course this price collapse started before Labour came to power - the earliest figure I have is £88/gram for July 1995 v £40 now. It was even higher in the 1980s - I have no idea how Zammo afforded it.

 

Perhaps they scrapped Grange Hill because the drug plot-lines would have been overwhelming. In 1994, just 1% of UK schoolchildren reported cocaine use. Now it’s 5%. And Britain - not the Netherlands - is Europe’s capital of ecstasy use – not surprising seeing as the price of a tab has collapsed from £11 in 1999 to £4 in December 2004. Heroin deaths rose fivefold from 1993 to 2006.

 

There is much talk about controlling drink prices – and I bet the dealers are wishing Tesco well in its demands for booze price control as part of its principled campaign against alcoholism, or did I mean independent off licenses. The pricier drink becomes, the more young people will be pushed into the arms of a British narcotics industry that has never had it so good. The pricier drink becomes, the more young people will be pushed into the arms of a British narcotics industry that has never had it so good.

Written byFraser Nelson

Fraser Nelson is the editor of The Spectator. He is also a columnist with The Daily Telegraph, a member of the advisory board of the Centre for Social Justice and the Centre for Policy Studies.

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