James Forsyth

The right way to repeal the hunting ban

The right way to repeal the hunting ban
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Back in early September Coffee House reported that the Tories were considering including repeal of the hunting ban as part of a broader civil liberties bill. Nick Hebert seems to confirm that this is what the party is planning in his Sunday Telegraph piece. He writes that “the Act sits with ID cards, the attempt to introduce 42 day detention and the removal of trial by jury for fraud cases as an affront to civil liberties. It is but one of Labour's laws that have overridden individual rights and asserted the power of the State.”

The Tories are right in both principled and political terms to offer parliamentary time for repeal of the ban. The ban was a small-minded piece of legislation which failed to look at the evidence. In political terms, Vote OK—the pro-repeal pressure group—is hugely supplementing the party’s campaigning base. During the Norwich North by-election one of the four main Tory campaign centers was staffed exclusively by Vote OK volunteers. 

Written byJames Forsyth

James Forsyth is Political Editor of the Spectator. He is also a columnist in The Sun.

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