12/07/2003
12 Jul 2003

12 July 2003

12 Jul 2003

12 July 2003

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Features
Sarah Walden
Shared wit of Whistler and Wilde

Oscar's play (I was there on Saturday) strikes me as a mixture that will run...though infantine to my sense...There is so much drollery – that is, 'cheeky' paradoxical wit of dialogue, and the pit and the gallery are so pleased at finding themselves clever enough to 'catch on' to four or five of the ingenious – too ingenious – mots in the dozen, that it makes them feel quite decadent and raffiné .

Shared wit of Whistler and Wilde
Leo Mckinstry
Regions of the damned

Whether we like it or not, says Leo McKinstry, regional government is already here – and it is expensive, absurd and undemocraticExpanding bureaucracy is the hallmark of the government. Since the 1997 election, there has been a deluge of expensive new bodies, from the Scottish Parliament to the General Teaching Council. Thanks to Labour, Britain is awash with publicly funded apparatchiks and well-heeled paper-shufflers.

Regions of the damned
Clyde Prestowitz
Like father, like son?

For a moment in early May, American neoconservatives thought they had died and gone to heaven, so much did Bahgdad seem to them to resemble paradise. Their vision of an America that would shed its paper-tiger hesitation and boldly use its overwhelming military power to crush tyrannical regimes and reshape the world for decades to come by establishing American-style democracies in their place seemed well on its way to realisation.

Like father, like son?
Kimberly Fortier
The truth about Campbell and me

Kimberly Fortier talks to Robin Cook about war and peace – and that day at Heathrow Don't you just love the two Robin Cooks? There's the philandering habitué of the turf, the one who runs off with his secretary; and then there's the conscientious objector to war, the one who sacrifices power for principle. These two Robin Cooks invite two distinct lines of questioning. The first is far more fun.'Tell me, Mr Cook,' I say, bounding into his office.

The truth about Campbell and me
Lloyd Evans
Hail, Galloway!

I spent last weekend trying to become a revolutionary. In early July the sunny avenues of Bloomsbury fill up with Marxists at their annual conference. The jamboree lasts a week (it's still going on right now) and there are lectures on a range of subjects from 'The Roots of Gay Oppression' to 'Luk•cs and Class Consciousness' and 'The Meiji Restoration: Japan's revolution from above'.I passed a useful morning in a lecture hall attending a three-module course in political theory.

Hail, Galloway!
Mary Wakefield
You don’t look Buddhist

There is a joke in the Jewish community about a typical Jewish mother who travels to a remote Buddhist temple in Nepal. Eventually granted an audience with the revered guru there, she says just three words: 'Sheldon, come home.'The first trickle of Jews began to convert to Buddhism about 50 years ago. The beat poet Allen Ginsberg was among them, and wrote, 'Born in this world/ you got to suffer/ everything changes/ you got no soul.

You don’t look Buddhist
Rachel Royce
Girls just want to have funds

The government would like to outlaw pyramid selling. Why? Rachel Royce has joined Hearts, the girls-only investment scheme, and finds it good, clean – and profitable – fun I have a confession to make – but please don't tell my boyfriend. I've made a somewhat high-risk investment. It will cost me £375, but for that I can expect a return of £6,000 – maybe. It's a gamble – I know it's a gamble – but I thought that amount of money could be laundered from the housekeeping, lost somewhere among the cornflakes and the chardonnay and bailiff demands for forgotten Blockbuster videos.

Girls just want to have funds
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