24/10/2015
24 Oct 2015

The end of feminism

24 Oct 2015

The end of feminism

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Cosmo Landesman
Women’s issues are for everyone now, not just feminists

Like all right-thinking lefty men who came of age in the women’s liberation movement of the 1970s, I always thought of myself as a feminist. But now, thanks to Meryl Streep, I’ve been liberated from the label. Last week I heard her on the radio promoting her new film Suffragette. Asked why the story of the suffragettes hadn’t been made into a film before now, she said that in Hollywood the men with the power to get films made didn’t see this subject as anything to do with them.

Women’s issues are for everyone now, not just feminists
Emily Hill
The end of feminism

[audioplayer src="http://rss.acast.com/viewfrom22/thedeathoffeminism/media.mp3" title="Charlotte Proudman and Emily Hill debate whether feminism is dead" startat=35 fullwidth="yes"] Listen [/audioplayer]It would be easy to believe from the papers these days that women have never been more oppressed. From the columnist Caitlin Moran to the comedian Bridget Christie, a new creed is preached: that we are the victims, not the victors, of the sex war.

The end of feminism
Harry Mount
Red-brick revolutionaries

‘I’d rather entrust the government of the United States to the first 400 people listed in the Boston telephone directory than to the faculty of Harvard University,’ said William F. Buckley Jr, the American conservative writer. Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party must be hoping British voters agree. Under Corbyn, the Labour party — once the clever party — has had a brain transplant. It’s out with the Oxbridge and Harvard graduates with first-class degrees; in with the red-brick university graduates.

Red-brick revolutionaries
Ross Clark
The Hinkley Point disaster

How easy it would be to scorn the environmentalists who are up in arms about George Osborne’s new pet project, the Hinkley Point C nuclear power station. You can understand their anxiety: subsidies for green energy are being slashed, yet the Chancellor will do anything — and pay anything — to get this project up and running. He is happy to force households to pay artificially high prices for a form of energy which brings all kinds of risks — of which the world was reminded this week when Japan found the first cancer case liked to the Fukushima disaster of 2011.

The Hinkley Point disaster
Paul Wood
How far can Bernie Sanders go?

[audioplayer src="http://rss.acast.com/viewfrom22/thedeathoffeminism/media.mp3" title="John R. Macarthur and Freddy Gray discuss how far Bernie Sanders can go " startat=1764] Listen [/audioplayer]Boston A woman’s voice carried through a lull in several conversations around the table at a smart East Coast dinner. ‘But he’s not even a fucking Democrat…’ She was one of the party’s stars and was talking about Senator Bernie Sanders.

How far can Bernie Sanders go?
Tom Tugendhat
Iran’s hidden war with the West – and what we can do to fight back

When British troops were on patrol in Iraq and Afghanistan, we faced many enemies, from jihadis to press-ganged civilians. But for me, the most terrifying ones lay buried. Bullets usually miss. Improvised explosive devices – IEDs — don’t. They are frighteningly simple. Old munitions wired together or plastic bottles packed with fertiliser and ball-bearings could destroy a vehicle and kill its passengers.

Iran’s hidden war with the West – and what we can do to fight back
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