25/06/2011
25 Jun 2011

25 June 2011

25 Jun 2011

25 June 2011

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Features
The Spectator
Advertisement Feature: Heart of the home

There’s nothing more appetising than a Sunday roast.There’s nothing more appetising than a Sunday roast. For the perfect taste, the meat must be sealed just right, trapping inside the flavoursome juices. Neff understands the passion for cooking required to make delicious food and has put that concept at the heart of its innovation for almost 40 years. And to this day, Neff is committed to helping cooks of all abilities rustle up the tastiest roasts in their very own kitchens.

Advertisement Feature: Heart of the home
Melanie McDonagh
What women want

The Tories are desperate to regain the female vote – but they have a very patronising idea of how to do itYou’d never think it to look at them, but the Tory party used, for much of the 20th century, to be the natural party of women. That’s right: women are, contrary to what most feminists like to think, instinctive Tories, if you judge by the voting record since the advent of universal suffrage. Not in recent elections, admittedly, but in general.

What women want
Ned Cranbourne
LIBYA NOTEBOOK

BenghaziOn the surface, at least, these are youm maasel, or sweet days, in Benghazi.BenghaziOn the surface, at least, these are youm maasel, or sweet days, in Benghazi. Strolling along the seafront I pass the exuberant crowds who have set up camp in Liberation Square. There are carpets laid out for prayers and around them, flags and trinkets coloured in the distinctive red, black and green of Libya Hora — free Libya.

LIBYA NOTEBOOK
Pavel Stroilov
Moscow’s jihadi

The Russian secret service and the new al-Qa’eda commanderWhat do we know about the new head of al-Qa’eda, Ayman al-Zawahiri? Not very much. We know he’s a former ‘emir’ of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad who spent three years in an Egyptian prison after his group assassinated the pro-western President Anwar Sadat. He’s also said to be a qualified surgeon, who became bin Laden’s personal physician and adviser in the late 1980s.

Moscow’s jihadi
Rod Liddle
The Daily Mail is not so uniquely British after all

I am thinking of starting up a free internet site called ‘Cancer and House Prices’.I am thinking of starting up a free internet site called ‘Cancer and House Prices’. Every day, a new piece of information, which I will make up, about tumours and property values and perhaps how these two phenomena are unexpectedly linked. I will also run photographs of young people you have never heard of but who sing in The Saturdays or star in things like Hollyoaks — largely nubile women in thongs with large breasts and tattoos — and supply a paragraph or two about how they haven’t got cancer or that they are about to buy a house, or simply live in a house, and how much it is worth.

The Daily Mail is not  so uniquely British after all
James Forsyth
The Alexander technique

Brown’s former disciple is now trying, very gingerly, to reconcile Labour with BlairismDouglas Alexander is a politician who has risen without a trace. He is now shadow foreign secretary, the third most senior member of the shadow cabinet. He has spent his career in the service of bigger beasts, first Gordon Brown and then David Miliband, so few know who he is or what he stands for. Now, at age 43, he is determined to make himself heard.

The Alexander technique
John Laughland
Liberty, equality, fecundity

At a wedding in the Loire last weekend, in the grounds of the groom’s parents’ small château, an acquaintance from work unexpectedly materialised out of the crowd. In his early thirties, he introduced me to his blonde, gangling wife, maybe a year younger than he. The conversation turned to children: they have four, including a five-month-old baby — ‘and a fifth is on the way’. ‘Where are they?’ I asked.

Liberty, equality, fecundity
Lloyd Evans
Making waves | 25 June 2011

The title Her Deepness is partly satirical, partly reverential. The woman herself, Sylvia Earle, is an American oceanographer and a global campaigner for maritime preservation. She dropped into London last week to collect a medal from the Royal Geographical Society and her visit coincided with a month-long promotion at Selfridges in Oxford Street. The shop decked itself out in deep-sea livery to alert us all to the perils of overfishing.

Making waves | 25 June 2011
Julia Stephenson
Pet hate

When my mother died last year, her small 13-year-old sheltie, Nutty, came to live with us in our London flat. I knew it would be difficult to keep a dog in town, but it was a terrible shock to discover how anti-dog the city has become. While taking him out and about on my daily rounds, I am often booted out of shops. In the bank, the chemist, most boutiques, the post office and department stores, it is No to Nutty.

Pet hate
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