29/04/2006
29 Apr 2006

29 April 2006

29 Apr 2006

29 April 2006

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Features
Fraser NelsonFraser Nelson
Cameron’s secret plan if he fails next week is to carry on regardless

Fraser Nelson says that the Tory leader knows that his campaign to win over the Lib Dem voters may not succeed in the local elections. But he has decided not to change his strategy a jot: the chameleon’s not for turningDavid Cameron could hardly wish for a better backdrop to next week’s English local elections. The Home Secretary admits that a thousand foreign ex-convicts have slipped the deportation net and been left at large.

Cameron’s secret plan if he fails next week is to carry on regardless
Christopher Caldwell
This is how Bush will be impeached

WashingtonIn early April a silver-haired lady held up a placard at an Iraq war protest that has since been replicated on bumper stickers across America and blogs all over cyberspace. ‘Will Someone Please Give George W. Bush a B*** Job,’ the sign read, ‘So We Can Impeach Him?’ For partisan Democrats — at least those still smarting over the 1998 impeachment of Bill Clinton for lying about his office sex life — the sign’s appeal lay in its combination of low humour and righteous embitterment.

This is how Bush will be impeached
Allister Heath
The Pole who is Europe’s man to watch

Allister Heath meets Radek Sikorski, the Polish defence minister, and hears his robust views on al-Qa’eda, economic reform and the European UnionThere are old Cold Warriors — and then there are those who actually donned combat fatigues, picked up AK-47s, and trekked halfway around the world. In the case of Radek Sikorski, a Polish Solidarity student activist who found refuge in Britain, the calling of the Afghan mujahedin proved irresistible and he spent a lengthy period in the late 1980s undercover with the guerrillas as they fought the Red Army to the death.

The Pole who is Europe’s man to watch
Rod Liddle
If BBC staff could be open about their views, we would all be better off

How should our unelected and unaccountable television and radio presenters and interviewers conduct themselves, so as to avoid the continual allegations of political bias?Last week, in this magazine, Charles Moore had a bit of fun at the expense of Jim Naughtie, the Today programme presenter, for having balked in a rather sententious manner when a guest on the programme described him as ‘a liberal’.

If BBC staff could be open about their views, we would all be better off
Jemima Lewis
I wish I had the strength of character to be a liar

It’s wrong, I know, but there’s something thrilling about a really humungous lie.It’s wrong, I know, but there’s something thrilling about a really humungous lie. Consider, for example, the sheer brass neck of Alan McIlwraith — or Captain Sir Alan McIlwraith KBE, DSO, MC, as he prefers to be known. This mysterious young war hero was pictured recently in the celebrity magazine No. 1 sipping champagne at a charity function.

I wish I had the strength of character to be a liar
Roger Scruton
An unhappy birthday to Sigmund the Fraud

Roger Scruton says that the century and a half since Freud’s birth has been marred by his imagined diseases of the mindFreud was born 150 years ago, on 6 May 1856, the same year as Wagner finished work on Die Walküre, the work which dramatises all the themes, from dreams to incest, that were to fascinate Freud. There is no doubt in my mind that it was Wagner, not Freud, who got things right, and that a knowledge of Wagner’s masterpiece casts serious doubts on Freud’s claims to originality.

An unhappy birthday to Sigmund the Fraud
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