30/11/2013
30 Nov 2013

You can't say that!

30 Nov 2013

You can't say that!

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Features
Gerald Warner
David Cameron is betraying Scotland’s Unionists

With trademark grandiosity, Alex Salmond unveiled his white paper on independence this week as if he had retrieved it from the top of Mount Sinai. ‘This is the most comprehensive blueprint for an independent country ever published,’ proclaimed the First Minister. It was yet another reminder of an inexorable law of politics: the larger the document, the weaker the content. The American declaration of independence managed to fit on a page.

David Cameron is betraying Scotland’s Unionists
The Spectator
The 2013 Michael Heath Award for cartooning — shortlist (part 2)

Nine cartoonists are shortlisted for the first ever Michael Heath Award for cartooning. The theme of the contest, sponsored by John Lobb, is ‘Man in Motion’. Work by four of the artists was printed in last week’s issue; four more are below. The winner will be published next week. Thanks to all who entered — and congratulations to those shortlisted. Sponsored by [caption id="attachment_9090911" a

The 2013 Michael Heath Award for cartooning — shortlist (part 2)
Rod Liddle
Rod Liddle: The truths you can’t tell in today’s Britain

My memory gets addled sometimes, so maybe I’m wrong about this. But didn’t it used to be the case that when politicians were caught out lying, they made some sort of shame-faced apology to the nation and begged for our forgiveness? I’m sure that was it, you know. So if I’m right, to judge by the case of our Attorney General, Dominic Grieve, things have turned precisely 180 degrees. Mr Grieve has just offered a full and unqualified apology for having told the truth.

Rod Liddle: The truths you can’t tell in today’s Britain
Andrew J.
The Iran deal just shows how badly Obama has failed

‘Yes, we can heal this nation. Yes, we can repair this world. Yes, we can!’ With these exuberant assurances, the young candidate, buoyed by an unexpectedly strong showing in the Iowa caucuses, vowed to carry on his crusade. One year later, in January 2009, the candidate became president and set out to make good on his promises. That Barack Obama possessed the ability to heal the nation and repair the world seemed in many quarters all but self-evident.

The Iran deal just shows how badly Obama has failed
Michael Henderson
Don’t flog a dead parrot - leave Monty Python in the past

You can’t go home again, as the Americans say. It’s worth running that adage, taken from Thomas Wolfe’s unfinished novel of 1938, past those zealots who snapped up 20,000 tickets for Monty Python’s reunion at the O2 Arena in 43 seconds when they went on sale this week. Four more dates were immediately inked in, with more to follow, one feels certain, as Python fever covers the globe. What a horrible prospect.

Don’t flog a dead parrot - leave Monty Python in the past
Digby Warde-Aldam
Stuck for Christmas presents? Hit the museums

The plan to do last year’s Christmas shop at Peter Jones on 23 December was doomed from its sorry inception. I was soaked by the time I got there, my plimsolls waterlogged, kept going only by my expectation of a quiet and civilised department store, rammed to the skylights with perfect presents. Instead, I found myself spearing a path through the seething, teeming, hostile masses with my sodden umbrella, and, worse — finding its  stock all but decimated.

Stuck for Christmas presents? Hit the museums
Andrew Roberts
Save our Van Dyck!

Why should a portrait of a Flemish painter by a Flemish painter be considered so important to Britain that the culture minister Ed Vaizey has slapped a three-month export delay on it, and the National Portrait Gallery has announced a £12.5 million campaign to keep it in the country? Moreover, why is it so important that after reading this article you should immediately go to www.savevandyck.org and make a generous contribution to save it from going abroad? The answer lies in four words: Sir Anthony Van Dyck.

Save our Van Dyck!
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