31/05/2014
31 May 2014

I hear you'

31 May 2014

I hear you'

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Features
Douglas MurrayDouglas Murray
Ukip aren’t going away – and David Cameron has no idea what to do

[audioplayer src="http://traffic.libsyn.com/spectator/TheViewFrom22_29_May_2014_v4.mp3" title="Douglas Murray and Mats Persson discuss the aftermath of the Euro elections" startat=40] Listen [/audioplayer]It must have come so easily back then. In April 2006, the young David Cameron had already assumed the mantle of leader of the Conservative party as arranged by his predecessor, Michael Howard. And as he prepared to assume the next highest office, the insult fell from his mouth with extraordinary ease.

Ukip aren’t going away – and David Cameron has no idea what to do
Liam Halligan
The revolution the West needs (and won’t get)

The western world is a mess. The ‘advanced’ economies are failing to generate higher living standards for the majority of citizens. Many of us believe, rightly, that our children and grandchildren will have less prosperous lives than we do. That not only runs counter to the tide of western history, but jars with natural human instincts, creating a deep sense of unease. The public no longer trusts the political classes to deliver a brighter future, so lots of us don’t vote.

The revolution the West needs (and won’t get)
Michael Henderson
Why Ken Loach hasn’t made a decent film since Kes

‘If you want to send a message,’ said Sam Goldwyn, one of the men who invented Hollywood, ‘try Western Union.’ It is such a well-known remark one might have thought every film-maker of the past 50 years would have acted upon it. Not Ken Loach. After half a century of fighting the good fight on behalf of the poor, down-trodden working class, the grumpy Oxford graduate releases his latest film this week.

Why Ken Loach hasn’t made a decent film since Kes
Freddy Gray
Meet Alex Salmond’s secret weapon: the England football team

[audioplayer src="http://traffic.libsyn.com/spectator/TheViewFrom22_29_May_2014_v4.mp3" title="Freddy Gray and Alex Massie on Salmond's secret weapon" startat=1363] Listen [/audioplayer]Why did Alex Salmond choose this year to hold the Scottish independence referendum? People have said it is because 2014 is the 700th anniversary of Bannockburn, Scotland’s greatest victory over the English, inspiration for that ridiculous last scene in Braveheart.

Meet Alex Salmond’s secret weapon: the England football team
Roger Scruton
Humans hunger for the sacred. Why can’t the new atheists understand that?

Does the world have a purpose? The new atheists regard the question as absurd. Purposes emerge in the course of evolution, they tell us; to suppose that they could exist before any organism can gain a reproductive advantage from possessing them is to unlearn the lesson of Darwin. With the theory of evolution firmly established, therefore, there is no room in the scientific worldview for an original purpose, and therefore no room for God.

Humans hunger for the sacred. Why can’t the new atheists understand that?
Andrew J.
If we have to let generals run Egypt, must we pay for them, too?

The polls have closed, and the result was never in doubt. With a whopping majority, Egyptians have chosen Field Marshal Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to be their next president. Much like his several predecessors going back to 1952 when army officers overthrew King Farouk, the new president brings to office ambitious plans to whip his countrymen into shape. What Egyptians need, Sisi believes, is discipline.

If we have to let generals run Egypt, must we pay for them, too?
Anna Reid
Viktor Yanukovych’s palace is full of tasteless treasures – and London auction-house tags

 Kiev On a cobbled street above the Maidan, an elderly man dressed in fatigues rubs his stubble in the morning sunshine. Would I like a lesson in throwing Molotov cocktails? He picks up a bottle with a long wire loop for a handle, and leads me to a burnt-out public lavatory. A match to the rags stuffed in the bottle’s mouth; an overarm swing, and the bottles smashes against the far wall, flames licking round broken stalls.

Viktor Yanukovych’s palace is full of tasteless treasures – and London auction-house tags
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