The Spectator

10 November 2018

Deal or no deal?

Both of Theresa May’s choices are unpalatable

Arts

What do we learn from these poppies ‘weeping’ from a tower in Derby?

Arts feature

For the sake of art as much as society, it’s time to stop remembering the war

Collective commemoration, far from ensuring justice, is a formula for unending grievance – and bad art

Maisie Williams as Caroline in the breathtaking new play 'I and You' at Hampstead Theatre. Photo: Manuel Harlan

Theatre

One of the best plays I’ve ever seen: I and You at the Hampstead Theatre reviewed

Plus: a scruffy heap of sketches and monologues from Debbie Tucker Green at the Royal Court

‘The Doom Fulfilled’, by Edward Burne-Jones, 1888

Exhibitions

Like today's conceptual artists, Burne-Jones was more interested in ideas than paint

And these ideas were remarkably nebulous. The results, on show at Tate Britain, are paintings that are boringly well-mannered

Making a Murderer 2's mesmerising dea ex machina Kathleen Zellner

Television

Thanks to Making a Murderer, Wisconsin’s bovine incompetence has been exposed

How long do the state authorities think they can get away with it?

Henry Williamson and Charles Carrington, two of the soldiers featured in Radio 4's Voices of the First World War
Money to Byrne: David Byrne deserves every penny he makes from this tour

Pop

Why David Byrne deserves every penny he makes from his tour

This was the most engrossing pop production I’ve ever seen

Carey Mulligan in 'Wildlife'. Photo: Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Cinema

Exquisite and riveting: Wildlife reviewed

This isn’t just a cut above most films about unhappy families, it’s a cut above most films, period

The Gyorgy and Marta show: the nonagenarian couple have been an unlikely hit on YouTube

Arts feature

One of the last living avant-gardists speaks – Gyorgy Kurtag on his new Beckett opera

The nonagenarian opens up to Norman Lebrecht on the eve of the premiere of his first opera at La Scala

Mike Leigh (Canadian Press/Rex/Shutterstock)

The Heckler

There’s nothing radical about Mike Leigh’s films

They’re feeble and self-indulgent and contain the political insight of Waffle the Wonder Dog