Entertainment

Cross-dressing in the Met. Policemen don women’s clothes to catch the Whitechapel murderer. Charles West (far right) leads the search in Jack the Ripper, 1974

What do Robin Hood, Jack the Ripper and Winston Churchill have in common?

21 October 2017 9:00 am

Houdini, Antarctica, a maternity ward, the electric chair – they’re all subjects of failed musicals. But it’s impossible to predict what will work, says Roger Lewis

Lights, camera, politics: the triumph of showbiz over argument

15 October 2016 9:00 am

How statecraft became a branch of reality television

How consumer habits are subject to the law of unintended consequences

31 January 2015 9:00 am

Some time in the 1960s, a group of people in an advertising agency (among them Llewelyn Thomas, son of Dylan)…

‘The Lion Queen’

Roll up, roll up! A history of the circus from Ancient Egypt to the present

13 December 2014 9:00 am

Nell Gifford joins a colourful troupe of acrobats, contortionists, lion-tamers, freaks and funambulists

Bookends

12 March 2011 6:00 am

About 80 per cent of books sold in this country are said to be bought by women, none more eagerly than Joanna Trollope’s anatomies of English middle-class family life. Her 16th novel, Daughters-in-Law (Cape, £18.99), is sociologically and psychologically as observant as ever, showing how not to be a suffocatingly possessive mother-in-law.