Hungary

Put your trust in Hungarian wine (yes, really)

28 April 2018 9:00 am

The wines of Tokaji run like a golden thread through Hungarian history. There are references to their nectar-like quality in…

In the face of strongmen, conservatives are letting their principles vanish

3 February 2018 9:00 am

In the face of strongmen, conservatives are letting their principles vanish

Elif Batuman’s heroine feels ill-prepared for life

1 July 2017 9:00 am

It has taken much of a celebrated literary life for Elif Batuman to produce a novel. At the beginning of…

Austerity has turned honest Greeks into criminals

11 March 2017 9:00 am

A lousy fortnight if ever there was one. Two great friends, Lord Belhaven and Stenton and Aleko Goulandris, had their…

Did I lock up a princess? She says I did

18 February 2017 9:00 am

Gstaad One’s unpopularity on account of calling it a night diminishes in direct proportion to the severity of the next…

We need another Eisenhower to bring an end to the madness in the Middle East

5 November 2016 9:00 am

Sixty years ago this week all hell broke loose: Soviet tanks rumbled into Budapest and put down a nationalist uprising…

We’ll all be Hungary soon if the ‘let ‘em all in’ brigade don’t shut up

8 October 2016 9:00 am

The good people of Hungary went to the polls on Sunday and voted by more than 98 per cent against…

Nasser carried through the streets of Port Said after the British evacuation, 1956

Blood and Sand comprehensively destroys what’s left of Anthony Eden’s reputation

1 October 2016 9:00 am

Until it was overtaken by the still more disastrous debacle in Iraq, the Suez Crisis of 1956 was widely judged…

Everything comes down to one man’s suffering: Geza Rohrig as Saul

Should the Final Solution ever be made into entertainment?

30 April 2016 9:00 am

Amid the abundant cinema of Nazi atrocity, Son of Saul is exemplary. Ian Thomson explains why

A child freedom fighter in Budapest, 1956

1956: the year of living dangerously

13 February 2016 9:00 am

The book of the year has long been a favoured genre in popular history, and is a commonplace today. While…

Monumental change: the overthrow of the statue of Napoleon I, which was on top of the Vendôme Column. The painter Gustave Courbet is ninth from the right

A short history of statue-toppling

9 January 2016 9:00 am

Sculptural topplings provide an index of changing times, says Martin Gayford

Investors are finally looking beyond the Brics

3 October 2015 9:00 am

As acronyms go, it wasn’t quite up there with Abba, named after the four founders of Sweden’s greatest export. For…

Merkel’s grandstanding on Syrian refugees will lead to many more deaths at sea

12 September 2015 9:00 am

By making them more likely to attempt the perilous journey to Europe, the German chancellor is luring would-be migrants to their deaths

Portrait generally thought to be of Ghenghis Khan

Was Genghis Khan the cruellest man who ever lived?

27 June 2015 9:00 am

From the unpromising and desperately unforgiving background that forged his iron will and boundless ambition, Temujin (as Genghis Khan was…

Béla Bartók recording folk songs with villagers in Hungary, 1907

Bartók would have made history even if he’d never composed a note

6 June 2015 9:00 am

‘All my life, always and in every way, I shall have one objective: the good of Hungary and the Hungarian…

Why Viktor Orban could be David Cameron’s new best friend

30 May 2015 9:00 am

Hungary’s Viktor Orban could be the PM’s most influential ally in EU renegotiations. So what does he want – and what can he get?

How Vladimir Putin is waging war on the West – and winning

21 February 2015 9:00 am

The Russian President has been trying to draw a new Iron Curtain across Europe

Go east – the people get nicer, even if their dogs get nastier

12 April 2014 9:00 am

When Nick Hunt first read Patrick Leigh Fermor’s account of his youthful trudge across Europe in A Time of Gifts…

Hungarian rhapsody

9 April 2011 12:00 am

Time was, or perhaps still is, though my friends long ago learned to behave, that a cutesy gift to musical acquaintances was a long, narrow notepad with the words ‘Chopin Liszt’ printed at the top and decorated with clefs and notes, free-floating and unplayable without a stave to anchor them.

More than a painter of Queens

30 June 2010 12:00 am

The last words of Hungarian-born portraitist Philip de László, spoken to his nurse, were apparently, ‘It is a pity, because there is so much still to do.’ As Duff Hart-Davis’s biography amply demonstrates, for de László, art — which he regarded as ‘work’ as much as an aesthetic vocation — was both the purpose and the substance of his life.

Fate, death and Alma

23 June 2010 12:00 am

Gustav Mahler is the most subjective, the most autobiographical, of composers.