Jackson Pollock

Red panel (1936) by Alexander Caldwell

Alexander Calder’s fine high wire act

11 November 2017 9:00 am

‘Mid-century modern’ is the useful term popularised by Cara Greenberg’s 1984 book of that title. The United States, the civilisation…

Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate in Millennium Park

In search of Chicago’s artistic past – and present

14 October 2017 9:00 am

The Windy City has inspired everyone from Hemingway to Saul Bellow – and now William Cook

A picture of pure energy: Watts’s ‘The Sower of Systems’, 1902

The Victorian artist who was more Jackson Pollock than Pre-Raphaelite

29 July 2017 9:00 am

On his deathbed in 1904, George Frederic Watts saw a extraordinary spectacle. He witnessed the universe coming into being: the…

‘Gas’, 1940, by Edward Hopper

The good, the bad and the ugly: RA’s America after the Fall reviewed

25 February 2017 9:00 am

The latest exhibition at the Royal Academy is entitled America after the Fall. It deals with painting in the United…

‘Bed’, 1955, by Robert Rauschenberg

The first half is essential – the second much less so: Tate's Robert Rauschenberg reviewed

3 December 2016 9:00 am

Robert Rauschenberg, like Autolycus in The Winter’s Tale, was a ‘snapper-up of unconsidered trifles’. Unlike Shakespeare’s character, however, he made…

In search of New York’s artistic past – and present

15 October 2016 9:00 am

As the Royal Academy hosts the abstract expressionists, John Gimlette heads to New York in search of its painterly haunts

Majestic, exhilarating and overpowering: Royal Academy’s Abstract Expressionism reviewed

1 October 2016 9:00 am

Martin Gayford is dazzled by the scale, majesty and visual power of the Royal Academy’s Abstract Expressionism show

‘Orange, Red, Yellow’, 1956, by Mark Rothko

A strain of mysticism is discernible in the floating colour fields of Mark Rothko’s glowing canvases

7 March 2015 9:00 am

Philip Hensher on the perverse, tormented Mark Rothko, whose anger and depression — often painfully apparent in his art — only increased with his success

Martha Graham and Bertram Ross in Graham’s most famous work ‘Appalachian Spring’ (1944), with a prize-winning score by Aaron Copeland

To call this offering a book is an abuse of language

8 November 2014 9:00 am

I picked up this book with real enthusiasm. Who cannot be entranced by those 20 years after the second world…