Restaurant

The ideal restaurant for the mythical Spectator reader: Bellamy’s reviewed

20 April 2019 9:00 am

Bellamy’s is a Franco-Belgian brasserie in Bruton Place, a dim alley in the charismatic part of Mayfair; the part that…

The joy of garlic and easy listening: Pucci in Mayfair reviewed

6 April 2019 9:00 am

I grew up in south-west London in the 1970s when Italian restaurants had exposed brick walls and paper tablecloths in…

Breakfast for idiots: it was the wrong time of day for a visit to Gazelle Mayfair

20 October 2018 9:00 am

I couldn’t find Gazelle. I walked up and down Albermarle Street, in which Oscar Wilde once plotted his own doom…

Empty restaurants are becoming a bad habit of mine: Coq d’Argent reviewed

25 August 2018 9:00 am

I wouldn’t normally visit Coq d’Argent, which I think means the chicken of money. It is a moderately famous restaurant…

It reeks of Alan Clark and the 1980s but all is forgiven for the food: Le Gavroche reviewed

5 May 2018 9:00 am

Le Gavroche is named for ‘the urchin’ in Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables and lives in a basement on Upper Brook…

Henrietta: a casual restaurant with formal food for people wearing hats

9 December 2017 9:00 am

Henrietta is a restaurant in a boutique hotel on Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, around the corner from the actors’ church…

J Sheekey’s sumptuous feast was enhanced by the presence of a celebrity guest

2 September 2017 9:00 am

J Sheekey is one of Richard Caring’s older, and better, restaurants. Since he has dowsed the suburbs of London in…

The members of White’s fall into two categories: shits and bores

14 May 2016 9:00 am

On Sunday we were invited for lunch at Chez Bruno, an unbelievably posh restaurant in the south of France. At…

A gastronomic moron’s view of a legendary French brasserie

5 March 2016 9:00 am

Before we left for Sunday lunch at the Les Deux Garçons restaurant, Aix-en-Provence, I checked the reviews on Tripadvisor. I’m…

The best champagne is worth sitting down to

5 December 2015 9:00 am

Champagne is the least understood wine of them all. The market is dominated by a handful of major producers who…

Dear Mary: why are young women dyeing their hair grey?

7 November 2015 9:00 am

Q. I have lunch once a month with an old university friend. Over the years we have both thickened out…

To tip or not to tip

24 October 2015 9:00 am

As I grow older, I find myself increasingly reluctant to travel, which is why it’s been a few years now…

I once tried to buy coke from the head of Manhattan detectives

23 May 2015 9:00 am

This is as good as it gets. A light rain is falling on a soft May evening and I’m walking…

Why I'd never own a rabbit hutch – or vote Green

2 May 2015 9:00 am

‘I suppose,’ said my dad philosophically, ‘I could always vote Green.’ ‘Oh, for goodness sake! Not you as well!’ I…

Bookends: The last laugh

9 April 2011 6:00 am

In July, the world’s most famous restaurant, elBulli, closes, to reopen in 2014 as a ‘creative centre’. Rough luck on the million-odd people who try for one of 8,000 reservations a year. It’s also a blow for the eponymous young cooks of Lisa Abend’s The Sorcerer’s Apprentices (Simon & Schuster, £18.99), the 45 stagiaires who labour in Ferran Adria’s kitchen for a season in the hope of sharing in the magic. Ferran, you see, is no mere cook. With him, ‘hot turns into cold, sweet into savoury, solid into liquid or air’.