Romanticism

What Mary Wollstonecraft writes about motherhood is still so relevant

22 June 2019 9:00 am

Walking into Fingal’s Cave, after scrambling across the rocks to reach it from the landing stage where the boat from…

Composer Amy Beach. Photo: Bridgeman Images

Amy Beach was better than Elgar

25 May 2019 9:00 am

At the Wigmore Hall last Friday, the Takacs String Quartet and Garrick Ohlsson played a piano quintet that was once…

Iceland’s national composer returns from oblivion

7 April 2018 9:00 am

The lur is a horn, modelled in bronze after a number of 3,000-year-old instruments discovered at various archaeological sites across…

Mary Shelley: a major writer, with a heartbreakingly difficult life

Mary Shelley’s monstrous creation close up

20 January 2018 9:00 am

There are few more seductive figures for biographers than Mary Shelley. The daughter of the radical philosopher and novelist William…

A triumphant Medea, puppyish bel canto and crowd-pleasing gulags: Wexford Festival Opera reviewed

28 October 2017 9:00 am

Luigi Cherubini is the pantomime villain of French romantic music. As head of the Paris Conservatoire in the 1820s he…

Meet the founder of the Boring Music Society (and possible neglected genius)

1 April 2017 9:00 am

It’s always promising when the orchestra won’t fit on the stage. For the UK première, some 97 years after it…

‘The upper part of the cascade at Hafod’ by John ‘Warwick’ Smith, 1793

How to view the view

20 February 2016 9:00 am

It’s not all picnics and cowslips. You need sense as well as sensibility to appreciate a landscape, says Mary Keen

‘The Death of Sardanapalus’, 1846, by Eugène Delacroix

Eugene Delacroix foresaw the future of society not just art

23 January 2016 9:00 am

Delacroix’s frigid self-control concealed an emotional volcano. Martin Gayford explores the paradoxes that define the apostle of modernism

‘Interior (Innenraum)’, 1981, by Anselm Kiefer

'I like vanished things': Anselm Kiefer on art, alchemy and his childhood

20 September 2014 9:00 am

Martin Gayford talks to a surprisingly jolly Anselm Kiefer about art and metamorphosis

Paul Nash, by Andrew Causey - review

22 June 2013 9:00 am

Andrew Causey opens his book on a slightly defensive note: Paul Nash, he says is often identified as Britain’s outstanding…