Second world war

Premier performance: Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill

Andrew Roberts’s guide to Churchill on screen

13 January 2018 9:00 am

Andrew Roberts on the challenges of playing Churchill

A non-sniggering look at the latest developments in the lucrative sex-robot market

2 December 2017 9:00 am

This week on Channel 4, we watched a cheery 58-year-old American engineer called James going on a first date. He…

Cover illustration for the magazine Garm 1944, by Tove Jansson

A chance to see the Moomins’ creator for the genius she really was: Tove Janssons reviewed

18 November 2017 9:00 am

Tove Jansson, according to her niece’s husband, was a squirt in size and could rarely be persuaded to eat, preferring…

Rarely has the West End seen such a draining and nasty experience: The Exorcist reviewed

11 November 2017 9:00 am

The Exorcist opened in 1973 accompanied by much hoo-ha in the press. Scenes of panic, nausea and fainting were recorded…

Don’t believe the sales figures – DVDs are thriving

4 November 2017 9:00 am

According to the accountants’ ledgers, DVDs are dying. Sales of those shiny discs, along with their shinier sibling the Blu-ray,…

Narvik harbour, March 1940

The ruthless coup that put Churchill in power

21 October 2017 9:00 am

Lord Woolton put it best: ‘Few people have succeeded in obtaining such a public demand for their promotion as the…

Robert Harris: We’re living in a Goebbels-style propaganda culture

14 October 2017 9:00 am

Robert Harris on fake facts, his new novel – and why totalitarianism is in the air again

Anthony Powell, by Henry Lamb (1934)

Anthony Powell gets the superb new biography he deserves

30 September 2017 9:00 am

Hilary Spurling impressively captures the essence and the spirit of Anthony Powell, his writing and his era, says Philip Hensher

Claudio Magris’s Blameless is seriously unreadable

5 August 2017 9:00 am

The first thing to say about Claudio Magris’s new novel is that it is, in an important sense, unreadable. There…

Festival time, Serbian style: playing the trumpet in Guca

Why everyone is flocking to Serbia's brass-band festival

29 July 2017 9:00 am

When brass instruments with button-operated valves were introduced in the first half of the 19th century, music-making changed. Once requiring a…

However brave it is, Dunkirk lacks an emotional core

22 July 2017 9:00 am

Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk has already been described as ‘a masterpiece’ and ‘a glorious, breathtakingly vivid triumph’, but we need to…

French Chasseurs d’Alpin en route to Norway, 1940

The disaster of Norway, 1940: Anatomy of a Campaign reviewed

8 July 2017 9:00 am

Amid the shambles that was the Anglo-French campaign in Norway in April and May 1940, a French officer observed that…

Plywood at its most curvaceous, acceptable and collectible: Alvar Aalto armchair, 1930 (left), and moulded plywood chair by Grete Jalk, 1963

How plywood helped us win the second world war

8 July 2017 9:00 am

The V&A’s Plywood show has much to teach us about human nature, says Tanya Harrod

Well-acted, badly written and poorly directed: Churchill reviewed

17 June 2017 9:00 am

The star of this film is the music, composed by Lorne Balfe. I really liked it, which was just as…

Star quality: competition design for the Roman Catholic cathedral, Liverpool, by Denys Lasdun, 1959

The greatest buildings Liverpool never built

10 June 2017 9:00 am

Liverpool has not treated its architects well. Stephen Bayley takes a tour of the bits of the city that were – regrettably – never built

A Kentish girl: Gemma Arterton as Catrin in ‘Their Finest’

‘People would speak to me as if I was an idiot’: Gemma Arterton on the horrors of Hollywood

22 April 2017 9:00 am

As she moves into producing, Gemma Arterton tells Tanya Gold why she hated Hollywood and nearly gave up acting

Silver Hut, 1984, by Toyo Ito

With no planning controls and owners craving the new, Japan is a Disneyland for architecture

8 April 2017 9:00 am

The house in which I lived in Tokyo was built by my landlady, a former geisha. It stood on a…

The charms of old Paris – and the naughtiest girl of the 20th century

25 March 2017 9:00 am

Paris used to be the most self-confident city in the world. Brash, assertive, boastful: Manhattan claimed to be the best.…

Terence Rattigan’s greatest secret wasn’t his homosexuality

18 March 2017 9:00 am

Robert Gore-Langton reveals another hidden side of the playwright Terence Rattigan

The SAS in the Western Desert, c.1942. John Tonkin second from right.

Why am I drawn to things that could kill me?

18 February 2017 9:00 am

Recently on holiday I did a very bad thing. I nearly left the Fawn to die on a precipitous mountain…

The consolations of sports geekery

10 December 2016 9:00 am

Sports geekery is a comfort in dark times – like, say, now

‘Shelter Scenes, Tilbury’ by Edward Ardizzone

Edward Ardizzone – the English Daumier

19 November 2016 9:00 am

It’s funny, isn’t it, how a dust jacket on a book can draw you to it from the other end…

Maps are as much about art – and lies – as science

29 October 2016 9:00 am

Maps reveal the psychology of their creators as much as they describe topography, says Stephen Bayley

Visionary: ‘Battle of Germany’, 1944, by Paul Nash

Wonderfully mellow, rich and strange: Paul Nash at Tate Britain reviewed

29 October 2016 9:00 am

In 1932 Paul Nash posed the question, is it possible to ‘go modern’ and still ‘be British?’ — a conundrum…

The Bomb, my film, and what really scares Japan today

22 October 2016 9:00 am

Tokyo is visual chaos everywhere, the antithesis of the Japanese interior. It is a multilevel jumble of overpasses, neon signs,…