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London

Very bad poems on the Underground

8 March 2014

My husband was surprised by quite a bit when we travelled by Underground in London the other day. Although he has a Nelson Mandela Memorial Freedom Pass, he seldom chooses… Read more

Jumbo

Why you shouldn't keep elephants

8 February 2014
Jumbo John Sutherland

Aurum Press, pp.292, £14.99, ISBN: 9781781212445

On 15 September 1885, the world’s most famous elephant, Jumbo, was killed by a train. Jumbo, the star attraction at P.T. Barnum’s travelling circus, was crossing the track at a… Read more

Lanes of London's Jammy Dodgers

Lanes of London is dining for Martians

8 February 2014

Lanes of London serves street food to people who hate streets; that is, it exists to soothe the still-curious mouths of lazy, wealthy paranoiacs. This is the character of the… Read more

(Photo: Tal Cohen/Rex)

Why I'm on board for the homophobic bus

1 February 2014

London has long since lost its allure for me — altogether too many cars, foreigners, cyclists, middle-class liberals and people who, like me, work in the media, as they call… Read more

London 2012 - London Transport

The case against London cabbies

1 February 2014

I lost my misguided faith in black cabs last week, on the corner of Royal College Street in north London. It was the tiniest trip — 2.4 miles from Bloomsbury… Read more

18 January 2014

Q. I have a problem with what might be called location blindness. I live in Balham, but when I arrange restaurant lunches with friends, most of whom live in west… Read more

Photo: Photothek via Getty

Matthew Parris: Logically, bitcoin fans should love the euro. Why don't they?

14 December 2013

Bitcoins have been in the news, after a story about an unfortunate fellow who jettisoned his computer’s hard drive that contained (apparently) the code he needed to access his stash… Read more

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Andrew Marr's notebook: Rescued by Jonathan Ross

14 December 2013

We live by simple stories. X has a stroke. X recovers; or doesn’t. But we live inside more complicated stories. Recovering from a stroke is a long haul; I still… Read more

The London terminus of the North Western Railyway in the 1860s, showing a busy scene in front of the Euston Arch, which was demolished a century later

The men who demolished Victorian Britain

23 November 2013
Anti-Ugly: Excursions in English Architecture and Design Gavin Stamp

Aurum, pp.260, £16.99, ISBN: 9781781311233

Lost Victorian Britain: How the 20th Century Destroyed the 19th Century’s Architectural Masterpieces Gavin Stamp

Aurum, pp.192, £12.99, ISBN: 9781781310182

Anyone with a passing interest in old British buildings must get angry at the horrors inflicted on our town centres over the last half-century or so. Gavin Stamp is wonderfully,… Read more

Matthew

Matthew Parris: I've been living with a miracle for 60 years

16 November 2013

This is probably the most self-indulgent column I’ve written. I hope not to make a habit of it. It’s an ode to — and something of a lament for —… Read more

Food2

Boulestin has nothing to do with Marcel Boulestin — but could entice Mary Berry

16 November 2013

Boulestin is a pretty restaurant on St James’s Street, between the posh fag shop (Davidoff) and the old palace, which the Hanoverians thought so ghastly that they moved out to… Read more

We are all the same Photo: Cactusoup

You're not as special as you think

2 November 2013

My preferred route from the Times’s offices in Wapping on to the main road takes me across a precinct then down a short flight of concrete steps to the pavement… Read more

takiwww

Taki: Ugly people build ugly things — look at New York and London

2 November 2013

New York Hot money from China, India, Russia and Singapore is pouring into London; hotter money from the same countries is flooding into the Bagel. London has become unaffordable for… Read more

diary_simon_heath

Simon Jenkins's notebook: Why a wind farm will never be as beautiful as a railway viaduct

12 October 2013

Until I plotted a book on England’s best views I had not realised how much people cared. Ask them to nominate a favourite church or house or even town and… Read more

What a coincidence

12 October 2013
Three Brothers Peter Ackroyd

Chatto, pp.240, £14.99, ISBN: 9780701186937

If you are going to read a novel that plays with literary conventions you want it written with aplomb. In Three Brothers we are not disappointed, as Peter Ackroyd shows… Read more

This isn’t a property bubble – it’s a reason to improve London’s transport

28 September 2013

Everyone —including me, if I’m honest — has been talking about a new property bubble. But is it for real? London house prices are rising at an annual rate of… Read more

Andrew Marr Appears At The Edinburgh Book Festival

Andrew Marr

31 August 2013

It’s been a strange summer. After a stroke, holidays are not what they used to be. We went to Juan-les-Pins for a week in a hotel. It seemed perfect because… Read more

London Luxury Homes Seen Losing Luster

A windfall tax on monster basements could solve London’s housing problem

31 August 2013

The mega-rich are best housed behind high fences, on wooded estates patrolled by dogs; that way, they don’t have to annoy the rest of us. But I can see how… Read more

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Melissa Kite: Spare me from successful neighbours

24 August 2013

At last. I’ve waited a long time for this moment. I’ve been through years of torture at the hands of excitable twenty-somethings, experimental thirty-somethings and Booker-prize-winning forty-somethings. I’ve had nothing… Read more

17 August 2013

Absent friends Sir: Alec Marsh (‘Welcome to Big Venice’, 10 August) accurately observes that Londoners are priced out of central London by largely foreign buyers of second homes. Wealthy foreigners… Read more

Notebook_heath

Welcome to Big Venice: How London became a tourist-trap city

10 August 2013

Queuing to gain admittance to the pavement of Westminster Bridge on a ferociously hot Sunday afternoon recently, I found myself trapped. Pinioned by a road to one side, a stall… Read more

‘Good things come to 
those who wait' Photo: William Brinson

‘Like a concentration camp run by KFC’: Tanya Gold visits Shake Shack

10 August 2013

Shake Shack is a hamburger restaurant in Covent Garden market. It came from New York and it is as needy and angry and angry-needy as America itself; it is, I… Read more

This photograph brought to you by Dairylea. (Also: Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Tanya Gold on eating at the Shard

27 July 2013

What to say about the Shard that isn’t said by the fact it is 1,020 feet high and looks like a slightly elongated cheese triangle, and that it is designed… Read more

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Rory Sutherland: Don't abolish The Knowledge

20 July 2013

Now that most taxi drivers use satnavs, should ‘the Knowledge’ be abolished? Shouldn’t we ditch the requirement that all London black cab drivers spend several years acquiring an insanely detailed… Read more

Inside The Victorian Graveyard Of The Glasgow Necropolis

Recycled graves – coming soon to a cemetery near you

15 June 2013

Two marble graves are side by side. One is grey and encrusted, with moss growing over the top. The other is smooth and shiny white. It looks new but, in… Read more