Freddy Gray

Is this feminist porn ‘artist’ really the best advert for western values?

Is this feminist porn 'artist' really the best advert for western values?
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There was something inevitable about Milo Moire's naked protest in response to the New Year's Eve sex attacks in Cologne in the name of feminism. Moire stood in the square outside Cologne's Cathedral, utterly clothesless except for a pair of red trainers. She held a placard that said 'Respect us! We are not fair game even when we are naked!' Moire is of course just another attention-craving narcissist, although in her defence it should be said that she does have an impressive pair of (fake?) breasts.

According to her Wikipedia entry, Moire places 'herself at the interface of art and pornography'. Judging from her saucy Twitter account, I would say she tends more towards the porn than the art, but I could be wrong. At any rate, her work -- if that is the word -- seems to involve a lot of her posing as a whore. It's hard to take seriously.

https://twitter.com/FredericClad/status/670271503292874752?lang=en-gb

Yet because every right-thinking person is so outraged about the Cologne attacks, her naked stand is being called brave and important across social media. We all want to defend western values, even if we aren't sure what they are, and we all want to make it clear to the huge numbers of young and, as Lara pointed out, mostly Arab males arriving in Europe that our women are not all asking to be raped. So a woman standing naked in a square is interpreted as a noble thing.

But it isn't. It isn't at all. Moire's vigil is exactly what it looks like -- a self-promoting stunt from a self-absorbed woman using her body to try to get famous. And you can't help wondering if such an act only serves to tell refugees that yes, our women are butt naked and fair game. Don't worry about the sign. Come on over!

Written byFreddy Gray

Freddy Gray is deputy editor of The Spectator. He was formerly literary editor of The American Conservative.

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