James Forsyth

So much for the idea that Mohammed Siddique Khan was radicalised by Afghanistan or Iraq

So much for the idea that Mohammed Siddique Khan was radicalised by Afghanistan or Iraq
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From the Intelligence and Security Committee's review of the Intelligence on the London Terrorist Attacks of 7 July 2005:

This photograph was taken from CCTV footage from a surveillance operation of an “outward bound” expedition in January 2001 attended by 40 individuals. The police and MI5 showed pictures of the attendees to their sources and were able to identify nine of the people who had attended. The man in this image, along with 30 other individuals, was not identified at the time.

281.

It was only several weeks after 7/7, when Mohammed Siddique KHAN was already known to have been one of the bombers, that a West Yorkshire Police Officer was looking through their files of old operations and recognised that this was Mohammed Siddique KHAN.

As Shiraz Maher, a senior research fellow at Policy Exchange, points out, the date here is hugely significant. Mohammed Siddique Khan was under surveillance in January 2001, nine months before 9/11 and several years before the Iraq war. So, the idea that he was radicalised by Afghanistan or Iraq just doesn't fit with the facts. We should face up to the reality that what motivated Mohammed Sidddique Khan to below himself up in an effort to kill as many civilians as possible was far more fundamental than the wars in Afghanistan or Iraq.

Written byJames Forsyth

James Forsyth is Political Editor of the Spectator. He is also a columnist in The Sun.

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