06/04/2013
6 Apr 2013

East vs East

6 Apr 2013

East vs East

Columnists

Columns
James ForsythJames Forsyth
What will David Cameron be remembered for?

Ten Downing Street has been an odd place these past few days. The prime ministerial portraits that line the main staircase have been taken down and the furniture covered in dust sheets, as the authorities take advantage of David Cameron’s absence to spring clean. But the process has reminded those who work there of the transience of power, of how quickly they could be removed and the question of what legacy they might leave behind.

What will David Cameron be remembered for?
Steerpike
Steerpike | 4 April 2013

Chat, chat, chat. Every member of the Cabinet enjoys a good old chin-wag with their ministerial driver. Except one. Dave appears to have taken a vow of silence. For three years the PM has stoutly refused to offer a syllable of conversation from the back of his bullet-proof limo. I’m told that a sweepstake has opened up in the car pool and the first government chauffeur to hear the Prime Minister break his oath stands to win about 1,000 smackers.

Rod Liddle
If Paolo Di Canio is a fascist, he should recognise the totalitarianism of his hysterical critics

I’ve often thought that British football needed a good dose of fascism — and now at last it has exactly this, in the form of the combative and somewhat eccentric Italian chap Paolo Di Canio. He has been installed as the manager of Sunderland, and all hell has broken loose. Di Canio has described himself as a fascist — but definitely not a racist, which shows that he is at least au fait with the current dictum that there is but one crime and one crime alone that matters.

If Paolo Di Canio is a fascist, he should recognise the totalitarianism of his hysterical critics
Matthew Parris
Frontline Tories to Cameron: ‘We don’t want to look nasty and we don’t want to look mad.’

Just before Easter, writing for the Times, I talked to 30 of the 40 Conservative MPs with the most marginal constituencies. My aim was to get a sense of how they think their party should position itself. I explored their opinions on a range of vexed policy areas. Finally I asked whether David Cameron’s leadership was a help or hindrance. The broad conclusion was that most marginal MPs took a decidedly and sometimes passionately ‘softline’ position on most controversial issues, European ‘interference’ in domestic human rights questions offering the nearest thing to a hardline consensus.

Frontline Tories to Cameron: ‘We don’t want to look nasty and we don’t want to look mad.’
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