09/04/2011
9 Apr 2011

09 April 2011

9 Apr 2011

09 April 2011

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Features
Claire Sharp
Advertisement Feature: A healthy classic

There’s no need to miss out on your favourite dishes with tasty, healthy recipes incorporating Benecol® foods, says Claire SharpBeef Wellington is often seen as a hearty dish made from rich, indulgent ingredients. If you’re concerned about your cholesterol levels you might think this dish is off the menu, but what if there was a modern, leaner version so you can still enjoy your favourite classic meal — the healthier way?This recipe uses Benecol Olive Spread and filo pastry, which contains less fat than other pastries.

Advertisement Feature: A healthy classic
Matt Cavanagh
Operation amnesia

Britain’s failings in Afghanistan have as much to do with short memories as shortages of troopsWhen Liam Fox visited Afghanistan in January, he was, like the defence secretaries before him, keen to tell the story of a country moving towards peace and stability. So he stopped by the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif, seen as one of the most orderly and peaceful in the country. At least, that is how it was seen until last Friday, when a mob stormed a United Nations compound and murdered seven unarmed staff — apparently to avenge a Koran-burning in Florida.

Operation amnesia
Taffeta Gray
Downe time

Kate Middleton has asked her wedding guests and well-wishers to donate money to Beatbullying, a British anti-bullying charity. This announcement has led to some silly stories in the press about how badly she was bullied when she was a pupil at Downe House, a girls boarding school in Berkshire. She was tormented, it’s said, because she was ‘too perfect’, so she left after two terms for Marlborough College, where girls mind perfection less.

Downe time
Rod Liddle
David Willetts should know better than to tell the truth to the Guardian

Are women to blame for almost everything, as the Minister of State for Universities and Science, David Willetts, seems to think? I would not lightly discount the possibility; they can, after all, be terribly trying. They are certainly to blame for most of the bad things which have happened in my life, if you discount me as a causal factor (which you do if you are me, if you get my drift). Not only that but there seem to be more of them around at the moment, in bars and restaurants, on our television screens, driving cars all over the place or arguing interminably with cashpoint machines as the queue behind them stretches way down the high street.

David Willetts should know better than to tell the truth to the Guardian
Philip Delves-Broughton
Bubble 2.0

There is nothing more maddening to an old-school investor than a bubble. And especially a bubble in which young people are getting outrageously rich. But here we are, 11 years after the last technology bubble popped, in the midst of another of those exuberant moments. Facebook valued at $75 billion. Groupon, a three year old coupon business, at $25 billion. College dropouts with a knack for programming and a devilish knowledge of our online behaviours are suddenly worth more than a roomful of Goldman Sachs partners.

Bubble 2.0
Michael Henderson
Acting up | 9 April 2011

‘We’re asked to console with each tremulous soul who steps out to be loudly applauded. Stars on opening nights weep when they see their names in lights. Though people who act, as a matter of fact, are financially amply rewarded, it seems while pursuing their calling their suffering is simply appalling.’The mummers couldn’t deceive Noel Coward. The Master knew all their ways, for he lived among them, as dramatist, actor, director and — as we have seen — songwriter.

Acting up | 9 April 2011
Robert Gorelangton
The face of space

Everyone loved Yuri Gagarin – but he was always a Soviet sideshowFifty years ago, on 12 April, Yuri Gagarin, a tractor-driver’s son from Smolensk, climbed aboard a capsule about the size of a Morris Minor, perched on top of a massive rocket. He followed into space a mongrel bitch called Laika, but unlike the poor mutt he survived. He completed a single orbit of Earth in 108 minutes flat and parachuted safely back on to Russian soil.

The face of space
Andrew Roberts
A vote against folly

Follow Churchill’s advice in the 5 May referendumOn 5 May, in the name of a spurious pursuit of fairness, the nation will be asked to abolish the ancient system of first past the post by which we have for centuries chosen our parliamentarians. ‘It’s unfair!’ is the whine of the aggrieved infant down the ages, to which adults rightly reply that life is often unfair, and success goes to those who can adapt themselves to that fact.

A vote against folly
Lloyd Evans
‘The global warming concern is over. Time for a return to sanity’: a Spectator debate

Lord Lawson, the former chancellor, proposed the motion by addressing various myths promoted by the ‘relics’ of the opposition. The average temperature rise since fossil fuels were first used had been barely one degree Celsius, he said, and no warming had been observed this century. The cost of ‘decarbonising’ the economy, he added, would be catastrophic. Oil was not about to run out and ‘winnable gas’ was available in ever greater abundance.

‘The global warming concern is over. Time for a return to sanity’: a Spectator debate
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