Architecture

Hope, the blue whale, replaces Dippy, the diplodocus, in the Natural History Museum’s Hintze Hall

The newly refurbished Natural History Museum is glorious

12 August 2017 9:00 am

Sometimes, it pays to rediscover what’s already under your nose. I’ve been umpteen times to the Natural History Museum but…

The Shard’s angled, fractured sides change its appearance according to London’s sky conditions

The Shard: a vast, unnecessary financial speculation

29 July 2017 9:00 am

The Shard is an unnecessary building. Nobody apart from its developer asked for it to be built. Nobody was crying…

Leave epiphanies to the poets and mystics

29 July 2017 9:00 am

‘I love the pumping station,’ said my husband, waving a copy of the Docklands and East London Advertiser which reported…

Why our Robert Adam flat is worth scarcely more than a boring one

15 July 2017 9:00 am

Of the 375,000 listed buildings in England only 2.5 per cent are Grade I. Half are churches; many are otherwise…

Star quality: competition design for the Roman Catholic cathedral, Liverpool, by Denys Lasdun, 1959

The greatest buildings Liverpool never built

10 June 2017 9:00 am

Liverpool has not treated its architects well. Stephen Bayley takes a tour of the bits of the city that were – regrettably – never built

The Body Zone, centrepiece of the Millennium Dome, a true symbol of the fatuousness, vapidity, incompetence and dishonesty that later characterised the Blair government

My part in the expensive calamity that was the Millennium Dome

6 May 2017 9:00 am

Stephen Bayley, creative director (briefly) for the Millennium Dome, lifts the lid on an expensive calamity

Silver Hut, 1984, by Toyo Ito

With no planning controls and owners craving the new, Japan is a Disneyland for architecture

8 April 2017 9:00 am

The house in which I lived in Tokyo was built by my landlady, a former geisha. It stood on a…

Square off: Mies van der Rohe’s Mansion House Square

London’s lost modernist masterpiece

25 February 2017 9:00 am

What a strange affair it now seems, the Mansion House Square brouhaha. How very revealing of the battle for the…

The interior of Hagia Sophia by Gaspare Fossati, 1852

There is no one Istanbul, but a series of competing, clashing, coexisting cities

11 February 2017 9:00 am

I was a young, aspiring writer when I decided to leave everything behind and move to Istanbul more than two…

Barrier method: view of the border line between Mexico and the US in the community of Sasabe in Sonora state, Mexico

If Trump were to build it, what sort of wall would the Wall be?

28 January 2017 9:00 am

Any impressively long wall is bound to cause us to recall the midfield dynamo and philosopher John Trewick. In 1978…

Paradise regained: Milton Keynes shopping centre (now called thecentre: mk) in 1972

Milton Keynes is 50 years old. Should we celebrate?

21 January 2017 9:00 am

We may snigger at Milton Keynes but let’s not forget its utopian spirit, says Stephen Bayley

Where the ‘garden village’ really comes from

7 January 2017 9:00 am

Village people The government announced plans for 14 ‘garden villages’. The concept of a garden city or village is attributed…

There is a dangerous new snobbery – but it’s not from Remainers

7 January 2017 9:00 am

Yet another kind of snob Sir: May I offer another definition of a ‘snob’ to the one described by Bryan…

There’s a revolution on Britain’s streets that newspapers never mention

7 January 2017 9:00 am

‘Trying to determine what is going on in the world by reading newspapers,’ remarked the journalist and screenwriter Ben Hecht,…

Trump l’oeil: the atrium of Trump Towers

Donald Trump's interiors: make America crass again

10 December 2016 9:00 am

Donald Trump’s taste is as revealing of the man as any of his outbursts, says Stephen Bayley

The white stuff: drawing showing sections of the stucco interiors at 20 Portman Square, c.1775, by Robert Adam

Three cheers for stucco – which The Spectator once called 'immoral'

19 November 2016 9:00 am

Whenever the words ‘stucco house’ appear in the newspapers, you can be certain the occupiers have been up to no…

Why cathedrals are soaring

8 October 2016 9:00 am

The Church of England’s unexpected success story

An act of doctrinaire official vandalism: the ‘hole’ during works in Les Halles district, 1975

The rise and fall of Les Halles – centre of Paris’s demi-monde

24 September 2016 9:00 am

Depending on your point de vue, Haussmann’s imperial scheme for Paris created townscape of thrilling regularity or boring uniformity. Whatever;…

Rievaulx: only swifts and pigeons break the silence

Stay amid the stones of Rievaulx

3 September 2016 9:00 am

We’re so used to looking at the abbeys smashed up by Henry VIII — particularly Rievaulx and Byland, in north…

One of the Maunsell Forts at Red Sands near Whitstable: built during world war two as an anti-aircraft gun tower, it became the home of pirate radio in the 1960s

Estuarial towns are an architectural utopia, says Jonathan Meades

3 September 2016 9:00 am

Estuarial towns are an architectural utopia — and the source of some sublimely weird sights, says Jonathan Meades

In defence of suburbia

6 August 2016 9:00 am

The suburbs fuel creativity, says Philip Hensher. So why do writers and artists look down on them?

An early folly: Rushton Triangular Lodge, Northamptonshire, built in 1597 by Sir Thomas Tresham as a symbol of the Holy Trinity

Let’s celebrate follies – England’s most distinctive contribution to world architecture

11 June 2016 9:00 am

Ruined castles, altars, temples of virtue, alcoves, labyrinths, pagodas: Stephen Bayley celebrates a peculiarly English obsession

True or false? The Temple of Bel, Palmyra, before and after its destruction at the hands of Islamic State

Why confront the ugly lie of Islamic State with a tacky fake?

28 May 2016 9:00 am

Can the beauty of Palmyra be reproduced by data-driven robots? Stephen Bayley on copies, fakes and forgeries

The lifts are lovely: Tate Modern’s extension reviewed

28 May 2016 9:00 am

Tate Modern, badly overcrowded, has built itself a £260 million extension to spread everyone about the place more. This means…

Hillingdon Civic Centre: a dozen red bungalows clumsily buggering one another

Jonathan Meades on the postmodernist buildings that we must protect

21 May 2016 9:00 am

Best of postmodernism: is that an oxymoron? Jonathan Meades thinks not