Books

Claire Tomalin in 2007

On the front line of feminism: Claire Tomalin’s memoir reviewed

16 September 2017 9:00 am

As literary editor of the Sunday Times in the early 1980s, when the rest of the editorial staff routinely papered…

Tears of a clown: ‘Clowns hate Stephen King. They blame him for the “creepy clown” epidemic, which has led to multiple clown arrests’

The genius of Stephen King

16 September 2017 9:00 am

The genius of Stephen King, by his number one fan Tanya Gold

How James Ivory made Howards End

22 July 2017 9:00 am

As one of his greatest films returns to the cinema, James Ivory talks to William Cook about his 50-year career

‘Tennis’, 1930, by Eric Ravilious

How artists from Ravilious to Rauschenberg fell for tennis

8 July 2017 9:00 am

Tennis is best played with a wooden racket on a shady lawn somewhere close to Dorking. There is no need…

Evgeny Kissin in 1993

‘The Western establishment is betraying its values’: Evgeny Kissin interview

17 June 2017 9:00 am

The great, enigmatic pianist has always divided critics. He talks to Damian Thompson about his heretical opinions on Horowitz, Israel and Brexit

‘Broadway’, 1954, by Marvin E. Newman

The forgotten photographer whose artistry is finally being celebrated

20 May 2017 9:00 am

New York photographer Marvin E. Newman has had to wait until the age of 89 for his artistry to be recognised. Laura Gascoigne spoke to him

Doodles by Winnicott’s child patients, including one (Fig. 9) by a boy who transformed the psychoanalyst’s squiggle into a sculpture

Why Britain's greatest psychoanalyst, Donald Winnicott, loved doodles

20 May 2017 9:00 am

Robert Adès explains why Donald Winnicott, one of Britain’s greatest psychoanalysts, loved doodles

‘The Deckcheyrie For Unbalconied Flats… will be found to work perfectly, we shouldn’t wonder. If not we’re sorry’, from How to Live in a Flat, 1936, by W. Heath Robinson and K.R.G. Browne

There was method to the madness of Heath Robinson’s extraordinary illustrations

20 May 2017 9:00 am

I first came across the extraordinary creations of the artist and illustrator William Heath Robinson at least 60 years ago.…

The Lost City of Z is a very long way from a true story — and I should know

1 April 2017 9:00 am

A new Hollywood film portrays Percy Fawcett as our greatest explorer. It’s pernicious nonsense

Why Milton still matters

18 March 2017 9:00 am

Paradise Lost can still speak to readers on its 350th anniversary – even if its champions sometimes seem to lose faith

The romance – and importance – of independent bookshops

11 March 2017 9:00 am

Oh dear. Usually writers who contribute to these diaries start with something like, ‘To Paris. To launch my novel at…

The Islamic world did liberalise – but then came the first world war

25 February 2017 9:00 am

The Muslim world had an age of modernisation. It died in the first world war

Very little theatre is important or valuable. This is: Young Vic’s See Me Now reviewed

25 February 2017 9:00 am

What does it take to become a prostitute? Youth, beauty, courage, sexual allure, a love of money, a need for…

I’ve got Mick Jagger’s lost memoir

18 February 2017 9:00 am

I’ve got it. But you may never see it

Apple Tree Yard (BBC1) didn't always observe the boundary between slow burn and just slow

28 January 2017 9:00 am

The mid-life crisis novel, I think it’s fair to say, is traditionally a male form. But in Louise Doughty’s Apple…

A hymn to a vanished era when immigration worked: The Kite Runner at Wyndham’s reviewed

21 January 2017 9:00 am

The Kite Runner, a novel by Khaled Hosseini, has sold more than 30 million copies worldwide. Now it arrives on…

John Carter Cash and Johnny Cash, 1972

Scholar, entertainer, poet, hoarder: the many faces of my father Johnny Cash

10 December 2016 9:00 am

John Carter Cash reflects on the many faces of Johnny Cash: scholar, entertainer, poet, hoarder

We live in a golden age of swearing

26 November 2016 9:00 am

Authors’ book tours are often fun but rarely easy. For me the long train journeys are a delight, but on…

‘Study of Two Blossoming Branches of Almond Trees’, early February 1890, Saint-Rémy

Is this newly discovered Van Gogh sketchbook real?

19 November 2016 9:00 am

Vincent van Gogh spent a remarkably short span of time in the southern French town of Arles. The interval between…

What you see is what you get: ‘Self-Portrait’ by Brigid Berlin

The wayward deb and Warhol groupie who invented the selfie

19 November 2016 9:00 am

It took a while for Brigid and I to get to know each other, not to mention like each other.…

A treat to hum along to but don't ask me what it's about: Bowie's Lazarus reviewed

19 November 2016 9:00 am

One of David Bowie’s last works, Lazarus, is a musical based on Walter Tevis’s novel The Man Who Fell to…

Bristles with sexual energy, emotional richness and, yes, indignation: Indignation reviewed

19 November 2016 9:00 am

Indignation is an adaptation of Philip Roth’s 2008 novel and amazingly, for an adaptation of a Philip Roth novel —…

The beauty of the Star-Spangled Banner

12 November 2016 9:00 am

There was something unexpectedly moving about hearing not just one but several renditions of the somewhat naive and rose-tinted but…

When jargon is essential

29 October 2016 9:00 am

I’m very glad I followed a friend’s recommendation to read The Bird of Dawning by John Masefield, an author neglected…

Distinctly corny: ITV's Tutankhamun reviewed

22 October 2016 9:00 am

The discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb may well be one of the 20th century’s great stories — but naturally that doesn’t…