Henry James

The Swinging Sixties meet Henry James in Anthony Quinn’s saucy Eureka

29 July 2017 9:00 am

In Eureka, Anthony Quinn gives us all the enjoyable froth we could hope for in a novel about making a…

Cynthia Ozick veers between the pithy and the prolix

29 July 2017 9:00 am

Letters of Intent — letters of the intense. Keen readers of Cynthia Ozick (are there any other kind?) will of…

How James Ivory made Howards End

22 July 2017 9:00 am

As one of his greatest films returns to the cinema, James Ivory talks to William Cook about his 50-year career

Stuart Hall in 1996

Stuart Hall, inventor of cultural studies, has much to answer for

10 June 2017 9:00 am

What’s this? An autobiography by Stuart Hall? Wasn’t he one of the guys who put the Eng. Lit. departments out…

‘The tightest topographic tangle in the world’

The bewildering, chaotic beauty of Genoa

22 April 2017 9:00 am

Some say Genoa takes its name from Janus, the two-faced god of time and doorways. Perhaps. What’s certain is the…

The white stuff: drawing showing sections of the stucco interiors at 20 Portman Square, c.1775, by Robert Adam

Three cheers for stucco – which The Spectator once called 'immoral'

19 November 2016 9:00 am

Whenever the words ‘stucco house’ appear in the newspapers, you can be certain the occupiers have been up to no…

The unsentimental education of the English girl in pearls

12 November 2016 9:00 am

If you were to take a large dragnet and scoop up all the shoppers in the haberdashery department of Peter…

Elegiac and exuberant: short stories from Philip Hensher and Helen Oyeyemi

28 May 2016 9:00 am

Discussions about the short story too often fall into a false dichotomy that can be characterised, in essence, by a…

‘We can really slow down and live with the characters, understand what they’re thinking and feeling’: a scene from the BBC’s adaptation of ‘War and Peace’

‘It’s good to chop out the boring bits!’: Andrew Davies on adapting War and Peace

23 January 2016 9:00 am

What does Andrew Davies have to say to those who accuse him of gratuitous rumpy-pumpy in his adaptations of the classics? Stephen Smith finds out

ENO’s production of ‘The Force of Destiny’ has a large, fidgety set and a projection of a vast horse’s head

That Force of Destiny isn’t a great evening is the fault of Verdi not ENO

14 November 2015 9:00 am

The Force of Destiny, ENO’s latest offering to its ‘stakeholders’, as its audiences are now called thanks to Cressida Pollock,…

Jonathan Galassi’s fictional poet made me doubt my knowledge of American literature

15 August 2015 9:00 am

Jonathan Galassi is an American publisher, poet and translator. In his debut novel Muse, his passion for the ‘good old…

Rich, thin and selfish in Manhattan

18 July 2015 9:00 am

The scene: a funeral parlour in New York. Doors clang as a family relative, the ‘black sheep’, saunters in halfway…

‘Another terrible thing...’: a novel of pain and grief with courage and style

21 February 2015 9:00 am

Nobody Is Ever Missing takes its title from John Berryman’s ‘Dream Song 29’, a poem which I’d always thought related…

Frieze Art Fair: where great refinement meets harrowing vulgarity

25 October 2014 9:00 am

If you wanted to find a middle-aged man in a bright orange suit, matching tie and sneakers, Frieze is a…

Look! Shakespeare! Wow! George Eliot! Criminy! Jane Austen!

16 November 2013 9:00 am

Among the precursors to this breezy little book are, in form, the likes of The Story of Art, Our Island…

Utterly natural: Onata Aprile and Alexander Skarsgård in ‘What Maisie Knew’

A painful but brilliant film: Deborah Ross on Maisie’s betrayal

24 August 2013 9:00 am

What Maisie Knew is an adaptation of the Henry James 1897 novel, updated to Manhattan in the now, and is…

The greatest novel in English – and how to drink it

20 July 2013 9:00 am

Which is the greatest novel in the English language? Let us review the candidates: Clarissa, Pride and Prejudice, Middlemarch, The…