Sculpture

Master of the zoom lens: Degas at the National reviewed

30 September 2017 9:00 am

Where was Degas standing as he sketched his ‘Laundresses’ (c.1882–4)? Did he watch the two women from behind sheets hanging…

‘Untitled (Clear Torso)’, 1993, by Rachel Whiteread

At her best, Rachel Whiteread is almost edibly attractive – but less is more

16 September 2017 9:00 am

Rachel Whiteread is an indefatigable explorer of internal space. By turning humble items such as hot-water bottles and sinks inside…

Reviving the death mask

16 September 2017 9:00 am

The inimitably pukka voice of Jacob Rees-Mogg echoed through Radio 4 on Thursday morning. He was not, though, talking about…

‘Spray’, by Harold Williamson (1939)

The marvels of British interwar realism

19 August 2017 9:00 am

One day, somebody will stage an exhibition of artists taught at the Slade by the formidable Henry Tonks, who considered…

‘Statue (Double Check by Seward Johnson), New York, 11 September 2001’, 2001, by Jeff Mermelstein

From Mussolini’s car to the Twin Towers: a history of dust

8 July 2017 9:00 am

Aren’t you getting a little sick of the white cube? I am. I realised how sick last week after blundering…

Up, up and away: ‘Endless Column’, 1937, by Constantin Brancusi

The most celebrated work of modernism that almost nobody has seen

24 June 2017 9:00 am

‘Everything is slow in Romania,’ said our driver Pavel resignedly, and, as it turned out, he was not exaggerating. He…

Shaun Greenhalgh claims to have painted ‘Before Kick-off’ (signed L.S. Lowry, 1923) and ‘La Bella Principessa’ (attributed to Leonardo da Vinci — but, according to Greenhalgh, based on a girl at the Co-op checkout in Bolton in the 1970s)

The forger who fooled the art world

17 June 2017 9:00 am

In 2006, after five decades, Shaun Greenhalgh lost his enthusiasm for the British Museum. From a very early age, he…

Do the bump: ‘The Visitation’, 1528–30, by Jacopo da Pontormo

A history of bump iconography

3 June 2017 9:00 am

Laura Freeman celebrates one of the loveliest of all New Testament images

‘Man Pointing’, 1947, by Alberto Giacometti

It’s hard to imagine a better overview: Giacometti at Tate Modern reviewed

27 May 2017 9:00 am

Size, of course, matters a great deal in art; so does scale — which is a different matter. The art…

‘Children Playing’, 1953, by Kenneth Armitage

It’s about time we recognised the genius of Kenneth Armitage

20 May 2017 9:00 am

What is it about Yorkshire, particularly Leeds, that it has bred or trained such a succession of famous modern sculptors?…

Folly by Phyllida Barlow, British Pavilion, Venice, 2017

Huge, diverse and yet monotonous, the Venice Biennale is very like the EU

20 May 2017 9:00 am

‘Are you enjoying the Biennale?’ is a question one is often asked while patrolling the winding paths of the Giardini…

An early super yacht supplied with prostitutes: an artist’s impression of Caligula’s royal barge, 18th century

The allure of shipwrecks

22 April 2017 9:00 am

Daisy Dunn investigates the allure of shipwrecks – from Caligula to Damien Hirst

Frankly dreadful: ‘The Renaissance of Venus’, 1877, by Walter Crane

Would the artists in Tate’s Queer British Art show have approved of being included?

15 April 2017 8:00 am

‘There is only one thing worse than homosexual art,’ the painter Patrick Procktor was once heard to declare at a…

Left: ‘Étude pour la tête d’Hamadryade’, 1895-1908; right: ‘La Valse’, 1889-1895

The sexual ecstasy of Camille Claudel – and why it proved too much for the establishment

8 April 2017 9:00 am

Camille Claudel’s extravagant talent proved too provocative for the male art establishment of her day, says Laura Gascoigne

‘Schicksalslinien/Be-Ziehungen VIII’ (‘Lines of Fate’/’Re-lations VIII’), 1994, by Maria Lassnig

Is collage the natural idiom for our cut-and-paste society?

1 April 2017 9:00 am

How do you make a work of art? One method is to cut things up and stick them back together…

The winner of the What’s That Thing? Award for bad public art is...

25 March 2017 9:00 am

Imagine climbing the hills that surround Belfast and stumbling upon this 11-metre-high steel bollock. ‘It will be visible from a…

‘The Judgment of Solomon’, c.1506–9, by Sebastiano del Piombo. © National Trust Images/Derrick E. Witty

Was Sebastiano imitating Michelangelo or – a startling thought – vice versa?

18 March 2017 9:00 am

Martin Gayford is mystified by the mismatched working partnership between Michelangelo and the painter Sebastiano del Piombo

‘Allegro Moderato Fireman’s Parade’ (from the Calcium of Light portfolio), 1974–76, by Eduardo Paolozzi

Paolozzi was not a slim man but you have to run to keep up with him

25 February 2017 9:00 am

Rudolfo Paolozzi was a great maker. In the summer, he worked almost without stopping in the family’s ice-cream shop, making…

Rodin’s ‘Gates of Hell’: more than 300 figures, including a panther-like Eve

Why Auguste Rodin preferred to sculpt women who couldn’t sit still

18 February 2017 9:00 am

The girl who posed for Auguste Rodin’s figure of Eve on the ‘Gates of Hell’ was, the sculptor said, a…

Moses has a formidable authority, with the physique of a bodybuilder and a beard that cascades like Niagara Falls

Michelangelo’s grave miscalculation

4 February 2017 9:00 am

‘How often’, wrote Sigmund Freud in 1914, ‘have I mounted the steep steps from the unlovely Corso Cavour to the…

‘The Four Elements’, before 1937, by Adolf Ziegler, which hung above Hitler’s fireplace

Was Nazi art really that bad?

14 January 2017 9:00 am

Bad men and bad politics don’t necessarily equal bad art. So perhaps it’s time to reassess Hitler’s taste in painting, says William Cook

‘Spiral Motif in Green, Violet, Blue and Gold: The Coast of the Inland Sea’, 1950, by Victor Pasmore

Who was the real Victor Pasmore?

14 January 2017 9:00 am

Victor Pasmore once told me how he greeted Pablo Picasso at Victoria station. The great man had come to Britain…

‘Bolshevik’, 1920, by Boris Mikhailovich Kustodiev

The USSR, USA, David Hockney and plywood: Martin Gayford on the visual treats of 2017

31 December 2016 9:00 am

Martin Gayford looks forward to two big Russian shows coming to London next year – and to other visual treats on offer in 2017

‘Scenes of the Private and Public Life of the Animals’, 1842, by J.J. Grandville

An entertaining show at Marian Goodman Gallery – where the joke’s on us

26 November 2016 9:00 am

Ernest Hemingway loved going to the zoo, but not on Sundays. The reason, he explained, was that, ‘I don’t like…

Detail from ‘Spring’, 2015, by Tony Cragg

March of the makers: the return of sculpture

29 October 2016 9:00 am

Until earlier this year, a squat sculpture nestled rather unobtrusively outside 20 Manchester Square in Marylebone, an address once made…