Virginia Woolf

Adachi Museum Garden, Yasugi, Japan (From The Japanese Garden)

Nothing’s coming up roses in the garden these days

11 November 2017 9:00 am

Emotional geography is now a recognised academic subject. Is emotional botany heading the same way? This is a year for…

George Eliot, photographed in 1858

Which writers really deserve to be called ‘outsiders’?

28 October 2017 9:00 am

The women writers Lyndall Gordon presents as brave ‘outsiders’ had easy lives compared with many other struggling authors one can name, says Philip Hensher

Nelson Mandela meets Mrs Dalloway in Johannesburg

19 August 2017 9:00 am

Martin Amis once said that the writer’s life is half ambition and half anxiety. While one part of your brain…

Who next for a blast? Wyndham Lewis in 1917, photographed by George Charles Beresford

Flappers, futurists, Bloomsbury and Putney – Wyndham Lewis's many enemies

1 July 2017 9:00 am

A superb retrospective at IWM North makes no apology for Wyndham Lewis: painter, poet, publisher and picker of fights. Laura Freeman reports

The colourful life of ‘Mad Madge’, Duchess of Newcastle

31 December 2016 9:00 am

There has never previously, I believe, been a novel about Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, one of the 17th century’s…

The beauty of the Star-Spangled Banner

12 November 2016 9:00 am

There was something unexpectedly moving about hearing not just one but several renditions of the somewhat naive and rose-tinted but…

A study of female street walkers is disappointingly pedestrian

27 August 2016 9:00 am

On 8 June 1920 an old beggar woman sat against a wall in Kingsway holding a mongrel in her arms…

‘Stack building, Malvern Hills’, by Laura Knight

A.E. Housman: the laureate of repression

2 July 2016 9:00 am

A.E. Housman’s poems leave us with the impression of fire that has been carefully wrapped in ice, says Robert Douglas-Fairhurst

The interior of the Swan Theatre, Southwark, in 1596, based on a sketch by a Dutch traveller, Johannes de Witt, and probably the best indicator of what the Globe Theatre would have looked like.

William Shakespeare: all things to all men

23 April 2016 9:00 am

The best new books celebrating Shakespeare’s centenary are full of enthusiasm and insight — but none plucks out the heart of his mystery, says Daniel Swift

Vita Sackville-West, c. 1940

More family history from Knole and Sissinghurst

16 April 2016 9:00 am

In deciding to write a book about her forebears and herself, Juliet Nicolson follows in their footsteps. Given that her…

The writer Natalie Barney and painter Romaine Brooks in Paris c. 1915

From Auden to Wilde: a roll call of gay talent

9 April 2016 9:00 am

The Comintern was the name given to the international communist network in the Soviet era, advancing the cause wherever it…

T.S. Eliot’s crisis year: exhaustion, hair loss and a wrecked marriage

12 March 2016 9:00 am

F.R. Leavis once denounced the Twickenham edition of Pope’s Dunciad for producing a meagre trickle of text through a desert…

Is this the real Queen? (Photo: Getty)

So the Queen's a Satanist cannibal? I’d still swear allegiance

30 January 2016 9:00 am

Roy was a superb mechanic, a methodical master of his trade. For an hour I respectfully watched him work to…

Hide and seek with T.S. Eliot

12 December 2015 9:00 am

Not only is this the definitive edition of T.S. Eliot’s poems, it is also the best biography of the poet we have, says Daniel Swift

Autumn: time for a pie

Autumn, season of conkers and new boots

26 September 2015 8:00 am

Each year when I see the first conker of the autumn I think: fire up the ancestral ovens! This incendiary…

A.N. Wilson’s diary: VJ Day and the Virginia Woolf Burger Bar

15 August 2015 9:00 am

Should we have celebrated VJ Day? Hearing the hieratic tones of the Emperor Hirohito on Radio 4 the other day,…

Rapture - and loathing: Woolf Works at the Royal Ballet reviewed

23 May 2015 9:00 am

People have been saying that Wayne McGregor’s new Woolf Works has reinvented the three-act ballet, but not so. William Forsythe…

Although Keynes hated his appearance, he was much painted by the Bloomsbury Group, including by Roger Fry (above)

John Maynard Keynes: transforming global economy while reading Virginia Woolf

28 March 2015 9:00 am

To the 21st-century right, especially in the United States, John Maynard Keynes has become a much-hated figure whose name is…

Vita as ‘Lady with a Red Hat’ by William Strang

Vita in her ivory tower: a portrait of a lonely, lovelorn aristocrat who yearned to be mistress of her own ancestral home

22 November 2014 9:00 am

Visitors to the National Trust’s Sissinghurst — the decayed Elizabethan castle transformed by Vita Sackville-West in the early 1930s —…

Castle Cottage in Near Sawrey, Cumbria, where Beatrix Potter lived after her marriage to William Heelis

Behind (almost) every great writer is a great garden

8 November 2014 9:00 am

It is a truism that writers of all kinds often find inspiration and solace in their gardens, as well as…

Chatting up Katherine Mansfield

4 October 2014 9:00 am

I like the New Zealand writer Katherine Mansfield, who according to Virginia Woolf smelt like a civet cat and had…

The Bloomsbury painters bore me

6 September 2014 9:00 am

Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) claimed that nothing has really happened until it has been recorded, so this new exhibition at the…

Sorbet with Rimbaud

23 August 2014 9:00 am

The Bloomsbury of the title refers to the place, not the group. The group didn’t have a poet. ‘I would…

Josefa Duran, the flamenco dancer known as ‘Pepita’

Wealth is no guarantee of happiness. Look at the Sackville-Wests

10 May 2014 9:00 am

When Robert Sackville-West was writing Inheritance (2010), his history of Knole and the Sackvilles, he was ‘struck’, as he recalls…

If you think Virginia Woolf’s novels are good, you should try her bread

12 April 2014 9:00 am

I have to declare an interest: as a scion of the Bloomsbury Group, I was naturally brought up on their…